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Thread: Banish Misfortune

  1. #1
    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Banish Misfortune

    Anyone suggest a tune to follow Banish My Fortune? I usually follow it with Connaughtman's Rambles but the box player likes to do Humours of Ennistymon with Connaughtman's.

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    Don't shoot the messenger xiledscot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    As a Scotsman I have to be careful,telling and Irishman how to play Irish music.
    On both mandolin and TB I prefer to play The Banish Misfortune with Whinny Hills of Leitrim and Another Jig will do taken from the playing of some Irish guys back in the Eighties.
    I prefer to play Connaughtman'sRambles with Morrisons and the Kesh.
    Whatever floats your boat!
    D MAC S :

    curently playing :- Mandos,Banjos,Geetars n' fiddles.

    It ain't what you do it's the way that you do it.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Old Hag in the Kiln & Kid on the Mountain...

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    but that's just me Bertram Henze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Hag at the Churn should go well.
    the world is better off without bad ideas, good ideas are better off without the world

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    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Thanks for the suggestions, and as for a Scot advising an Irish lad on playing Irish music...I once saw a Rastafarian playing Bass in an Irish ballad group in Toronto :-)

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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Quote Originally Posted by xiledscot View Post
    As a Scotsman I have to be careful,telling and Irishman how to play Irish music.
    Since the Irishman is asking, I think we're all entitled to offer our suggestions. As an Englishman living in Wales, three that, off the top of my head, seem to follow on nicely from Banish Misfortune are: The Battering Ram, A Trip to the Cottage, The Lark in the Morning. (...by which I mean one of the above, not all of them in sequence.)

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    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Thank you for the suggestion Mr Englishman :-) Quick question...I once met Martin Carthy at a folk festival while listening to an Irish Ceili group, we spoke about Irish/Morris polkas, he felt while there were similar melody's there were obvious differences. Are there any obvious examples of specifically English Jigs?

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    Registered User Colin Lindsay's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Probably only in the title. I write jigs and other tunes in the Ulster-Scots tradition and given that they’re all the usual rhythm, played on trad folk instruments, they may as well be Irish - except for the name, which is usually something picked by me to reflect their background or geographical location..
    "Danger! Do Not Touch!" must be one of the scariest things to read in Braille....

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    Mandolin Botherer Shelagh Moore's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    I usually play the Kid on the Mountain (Bike) after it.

    That tune always reminds me of a session in London about 25-30 years ago when the same man, always very drunk, used to come up to us every week and ask us to play ".... that tune, you know the one... is it called Varnish Me F***skin?"

    Richard (Irishman in Scotland)

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  12. #10
    but that's just me Bertram Henze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    There is always someone like that in a session Richard, but this linguistic creativity is rare indeed...
    the world is better off without bad ideas, good ideas are better off without the world

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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Brett View Post
    Are there any obvious examples of specifically English Jigs?
    There are lots of English jigs, although many have crossed over into (and from) the Irish and Scots traditions. An example of one that is not heard much outside English the traditional repertoire is The Oyster Girl http://thesession.org/tunes/3319
    A more modern example, composed by John Kirkpatrick in, arguably, an English style, and very popular in English sessions (and beyond) is Jump At The Sun http://thesession.org/tunes/736

    More generally speaking, I think it is true to say that the English repertoire abounds more in single jigs than the Irish repertoire (For the difference between double and single jigs, there are numerous threads over at http://thesession.org/discussions - but, in brief, double jigs go "diddly diddly" whilst single jigs go "humpty dumpty".) IN the case of jigs that are common to both traditions, the English version is often less 'notey' than the Irish one.

    Having cut my trad teeth in London (where there is very little English trad to be found) and the West of Ireland, I am much more familiar with Irish music than English. It is only (ironically) since moving to Wales that I have begun to build a repertoire of English tunes. And then there's Welsh music...
    Last edited by whistler; Jun-11-2014 at 3:45pm.

  14. #12

    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    MacPherson's Farewell (rant or lament)..

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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune - melody and harmony



    I did this unaccompanied, just me, myself and I...and it took a while to synch up the two parts..added a bit of Roland piano synth in the middle for variation..Three parts are usually A x 2, B x 2, C x 2..I did it as A B C -
    I can't play it as fast as some i see posted but I have pretty pictures..so....off to the dentist..may encounter my own misfortune..yikes...

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    Registered User Mike Buesseler's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Refreshingly original and interesting arrangement/performance! Nice, Ginny!

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    Don't shoot the messenger xiledscot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Very nice recording Ginny.
    I proves the point that speed is not the optimum for this music.
    Too often, players play at breakneck speed with disastrous results.
    They appear to be playing all the right notes but not necessarily in the right order,

    Hope all went well at the dentist.
    Here on the 'Gentle Isle' it's still emergency only.
    The traditional solution is to swirl whiskey around the affected area, always remembering not to swallow afterwards.
    D MAC S :

    curently playing :- Mandos,Banjos,Geetars n' fiddles.

    It ain't what you do it's the way that you do it.

  18. #16

    Default Re: Banish Misfortune - melody and harmony

    Clean picking Ginny.
    Quote Originally Posted by Ginny Aitchison View Post
    I can't play it as fast as some
    I can but I choose not to. I like the vibes of it slow.

    One of my videos from a couple years ago, very slow and has different-than-usual chords which I like:


    (or direct link)
    Misc: older Banish Misfortune threads with various other Cafe members' videos - MandolinCafe Song-A-Week 467 and prior to that it was a SAW "other tune" (page 1 & page 2).

  19. #17
    Registered User Mike Buesseler's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Another gem!

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  21. #18

    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Brett View Post
    Thank you for the suggestion Mr Englishman :-) Quick question...I once met Martin Carthy at a folk festival while listening to an Irish Ceili group, we spoke about Irish/Morris polkas, he felt while there were similar melody's there were obvious differences. Are there any obvious examples of specifically English Jigs?
    I know this about six years late as a reply but here’s an Olde English manuscript, try out four or five of the jigs in here and you’ll probably notice some Englishness.
    https://pghardy.net/concertina/tuneb...arke_tunes.pdf
    When I was a kid I met an old man who worked on the barges and said that if you want to hear good music you have to go to Norfolk, it’s part of East Anglia. A large part of the area was marshland that was drained using immigrant workers through the 17/1800’s. Not sure what music they brought with them...

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  23. #19
    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Funny to see this post, I still play with the same trio and we now play Dusty Windowsills with Banish Misfortune.

  24. #20
    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Actually here's us playing it, way too fast in my opinion but I was outvoted! and thus make some mistakes!


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  26. #21
    Don't shoot the messenger xiledscot's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Sounded pretty good to me Paul............it was a little slower than I play it.
    D MAC S :

    curently playing :- Mandos,Banjos,Geetars n' fiddles.

    It ain't what you do it's the way that you do it.

  27. #22
    Registered User foldedpath's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    That sounded good to me, Paul. Nice job! It's faster than I play it, but not by much. All due respect to slower interpretations, but for me "Banish" is a tune that comes alive when it's played at a lively pace.

  28. #23
    but that's just me Bertram Henze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    I am with foldedpath here, Paul. Not too fast, but just like any other jig (at approx 120 bpm), that's what I do. The slow versions tend to sound like painful dirges, and that just does not go with the name of the tune.

    I liked that staccato in the last part!
    the world is better off without bad ideas, good ideas are better off without the world

  29. #24
    Registered User Paul Brett's Avatar
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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    That's generally the speed we play jigs at. Maybe one or two a bit faster, Connaughtman's Rambles for example and there are a few that I've come across which feel nicer to me slower, The Rolling Waves, The Eavesdropper?

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    Default Re: Banish Misfortune

    Quote Originally Posted by Simon DS View Post
    I know this about six years late as a reply but hereís an Olde English manuscript, try out four or five of the jigs in here and youíll probably notice some Englishness.
    https://pghardy.net/concertina/tuneb...arke_tunes.pdf
    When I was a kid I met an old man who worked on the barges and said that if you want to hear good music you have to go to Norfolk, itís part of East Anglia. A large part of the area was marshland that was drained using immigrant workers through the 17/1800ís. Not sure what music they brought with them...
    We posted a set of English Jigs the other week :



    For me the most English of them is the 'Lincolnshire Poacher' if only because we were taught it as a song in school. Captain La(m/n)oes's is often played with The Rogues March for dancing. I can imagine ankle bells for all of them.

    'Tis my delight of a summer's night in the season of the year....'
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