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Thread: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

  1. #26
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    ...the trademark and unfair competition law too!

  2. #27
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    Hello!

    That`s the book, that I mentioned about. It`s printed in 1907 (may be earlier. 1907 is the year, when it was filed in the library). The author is Mr. N.A. Miloshev. I don`t know anything about him. “School book for Mandolin”, “Suitable for self teaching”.
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  3. #28
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    It starts from the very beginning with the simple definition: “The music is an art to produce and join the sounds so, that they bring pleasure to the ear.” We could add "...and to the soul." perhaps. Some basic explanations about the notes, the violin key, etc.
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  4. #29
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    The explanations to these pictures are on the previous page:
    “How to hold the mandolin. One has to get used to play sitting and standing. While sitting, the mandolin has not to be leaned on the thigh. (?) The link hand holds the neck of the mandolin with the thumb and with the forefinger, so that the fingers could loosely press the frets from 1 to 7. The palm of the hand should not touch the neck. The right hand plucks the strings with the pick (mediator), which should be hold with the thumb and the forefinger. The right forearm rests on the end of the mandolin and should be pressed so that while picking or tremolling neither the arm, nor the instrument has to be moved. The picking should be made only with the wrist and it has to be absolutely free."
    Alex, don`t you think, that the guy from the picture looks like L. Embergher?



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  5. #30
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    A graphical description could be seen on this page. In brackets you can see the French word “La touché”. And after that in brackets again (Cordes de Mi, de La, de Re, de Sol). One may suppose that Mr. Miloshev has used a French (Belgium) mandolin instruction book for a basis. Any ideas? Ranieri? Or a Pettine connection? The pick shown on the previous picture looks like a Pettine pick. Wasn`t he also an intercessor of the standing playing position?



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  6. #31
    Registered User Plamen Ivanov's Avatar
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    Then different explanations and studies are following. Also a lot of well known opera pieces from Verdi, Bizet, Donizzeti, Glinka, Tchaikovski, Bellini, Toma, Gunout, Mascani.
    Don`t have time to check the correct spelling of the names. I apologize.

    Good luck!

    Plamen




  7. #32
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heinri...28Gitarrist%29

    Heinrich Albert (1870-1950) According to Michael Reichenbach, Albert's music will be available when it enters the public domain in 2021. He did use pseudonyms like "Alberto". The reason I'm posting this is because it doesn't fit into my category of Italian composers who immigrated to America. I'm uploading his mandolin trio (minus the vital guitar part, unfortunately). If anyone finds the date of publication or knows of any recording source, please post it. Thanks. Sheri

    P.S. Luigi Giorno (whose mandolin is featured on the cover of my "Italian Mandolin Heroes in America" played this in Philadelphia. Obviously, judging from the title there were plenty of mandoli-playing Italians from Monaco (note, the famous Grimaldi family).
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  8. #33
    Registered User Bruce Clausen's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Thank you for that, Sheri! It's nice to know that our mystery mandolin pedagogue is none other than Heinrich Albert, well known to classical guitarists as the editor of most of the classical-period chamber music that was available to us up until 1970 or so. Many of us have used his editions of important works by Boccherini, Giuliani, Matiegka and many other early 19th century composers. (Well, important for guitarists at least.)

  9. #34
    Registered User Martin Jonas's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Clausen View Post
    Thank you for that, Sheri! It's nice to know that our mystery mandolin pedagogue is none other than Heinrich Albert, well known to classical guitarists as the editor of most of the classical-period chamber music that was available to us up until 1970 or so. Many of us have used his editions of important works by Boccherini, Giuliani, Matiegka and many other early 19th century composers. (Well, important for guitarists at least.)
    Heinrich Albert did indeed also go by the name of "Francesco Alberti", and he did indeed also write at least one mandolin method (listed by Michael Reichenbach here), but according to Alex Timmerman he was not the "A. Alberto" who wrote the mandolin tutor discussed in this thread -- see Alex's posts at #15 and #17 in this thread where he discussed the respective identities of "A. Alberto", "Heinrich Albert" and "Francesco Alberti".

    Martin

  10. #35
    Registered User Bruce Clausen's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Hmm, I wonder. The Wikipedia article tells us Albert published early compositions under the name Enrico (sic) Alberto, and founded before 1900 the Milan Mandolin Club, and that after 1900 he was established as a guitar and mandolin instructor in Munich. He is credited there as the author of the Neue Mandolinschule (Leipzig, 1913), the method listed by Michael. And I agree with your earlier posts noting the German content of the little "Alberto" self-instruction book. I'd think Heinrich Albert is the obvious suspect, unless some other information about that author exists. (And I think that was Sheri's assumption too. Is that correct, Sheri?)

  11. #36
    Registered User Bruce Clausen's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Quote Originally Posted by Alex Timmerman View Post
    Signor Alberto was as Italian as one can be. And like like Ranieri and Di Pietro etc. etc., an immigrant who tried to make his living abroad.

    This ´living´ he found first in Germany where he was active as a guitar and mandolin teacher during the first quarter of the 20th Century.

    Unhappy with the political events that took place towards the thirties he left Germany. A decision that was hastened because of a new installed law in the late twenties that forced foreigners to join the German army.

    Near the thirties the story of A. Alberto ends in Germany.
    Oops. I see this now in Alex's post #15. Would be very glad to know the source of this information.

  12. #37
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Italian online libraries offer the alternative "Enrico Alberti" and that may be how many Italian musicians remember him.

  13. #38
    Registered User Martin Jonas's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    Quote Originally Posted by Bruce Clausen View Post
    Oops. I see this now in Alex's post #15. Would be very glad to know the source of this information.
    Yes, indeed -- my own initial suspicion in my opening post was the same as yours and Sheri's: the material is much more German than Italian so a pseudonym for Heinrich Albert seemed likely. However, Alex's post is very specific so I have to assume he has some solid information to this effect.

    Martin

    PS: Thanks to Sheri for the Albert mandolin march. Nothing by him in Nakano or the Biblioteca della chitarra e del mandolino, but IMSLP has a Scherzo grazioso for romantic mandolin quartet (link). It's from 1908 and public domain in the US, but not the EU (as Sheri has said, his compositions will become PD in the EU at the end of 2020, 70 years after his death in 1950).

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  15. #39
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: A. Alberto - Kleine Mandolinen-Schule

    It seems that it's easy to conflate names and especially Anton (né Antonio?) Alberto and Heinrich Albert (Enrico Alberti) (both guitarists). Until we can get bio facts for Alberto, we should be wary.

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