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Thread: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

  1. #26
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Werner Jaekel posted this Johann Quantz piece in another thread which works as nice arpeggio warmup IMHO.

    Quote Originally Posted by Werner Jaekel View Post
    I love Bach, who doesn't. And Johann Quantz, by the way.

    X:1
    T:Minuet (version 1)
    C:JohannQuantz
    N:Arranged for mandolin by Alan Howard
    L:1/8
    Q:240
    M:3/4
    K:C
    z4 e2 |: A,C EA ce | DA fe dc | G,B, DG Bd | CG ed cB | AA, CF Ac | B,F dc BA | \
    E^G B2 A2 | BE ^GB ed | A,C EA ce | DA fe dc | G,B, DG Bd | CG ed cB | AA, CF Ac | \
    B,F dc BA | BE ed cB |1 A2 A,2 e2 :|2 A2 A,2 c2 |: CE Gc eC | B,d ef gB, | A,c fe dc | \
    BG, DG Bd | CE Gc eC | B,d ef gB, | A,c fe dc | B2 G,2 g2 | ^CA ^ce a2 | DA fe fC | \
    B,d ef g2 | CG ed eE | FA df dc | GB dF Ec | Fd Gc G,B |1 [c2E2] C2 c2 :|2 [c2E2] C2 e2 | \
    A,C EA ce | DA fe dc | G,B, DG Bd | CG ed cB | AA, CF Ac | B,F dc BA | E^G B2 A2 | \
    BE ^GB ed | A,C EA ce | DA fe dc | G,B, DG Bd | CG ed cB | AA, CF Ac | B,F dc BA | \
    BE ed cB | A2 A,4 | \
    Attached is the notated version from the ABCs.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails quantz.pdf  
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    [QUOTE=jramsey;1123280. . . and my third exercise is variation on Jethro Burns' "Exercise a la Ellington" in his book.[/QUOTE]

    That one's great, and "Warmup Thing" gets a person going up the neck. Burns' book needs to make a comeback. Also helpful is Gordon Stobbe's *The Fiddler's Red Book of Scales and Arpeggios*. Just ignore the bowing instructions. 2. Maybe the greatgranddad of exercise books is Kreutzer's. Paul Anastasio said this was what Joe Venuti always made him bring to his lessons with Venuti. You don't have to get hung up with exercises to learn from doing a few of them.

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Thanks all of this is so helpful and though finding some of these books in SA is a struggle, one is at least pointed in the right direction as far as good exercises go?

  6. #29

    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Hi,

    to me it is absolutely boring without any fun whatsoever to run scales up and down just for the purpose of playing a scale.

    I prefer to pick interesting tunes in particular scales, look for deviations in the notation, and play these in full awareness of the scale. Also I look for tunes for example in A or Bminor, to get a sense for the difference. And same time for another maybe in Bb or Gm.

    The first thing when I see a new tune I look for the scale by counting flats or sharps. It's a good exercise.

    Also, if one is familiar with the circle of fifths and with the rule of sharps and flats and with the fretboard one can play scales without memorizing them. No need for any book.

    I found the book by Matt Raum Technique Studies is very useful.

    For a work out I use a tune like this one


    Originally Posted by Jim Garber
    Werner Jaekel posted this Johann Quantz piece in another thread which works as nice arpeggio warmup IMHO.
    Hi, Jim, just spotted your post and thought a tef might help. These classical pieces offer good scale and arpeggio exercises. And a good workout for the left hand. I have two more by Johann Quantz, if you are interested. And more from Bach.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Last edited by Werner Jaekel; Jan-19-2013 at 4:37pm.

  7. #30
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by Werner Jaekel View Post
    Hi, Jim, just spotted your post and thought a tef might help. These classical pieces offer good scale and arpeggio exercises. And a good workout for the left hand. I have two more by Johann Quantz, if you are interested. And more from Bach.
    I like the Quantz piece but I prefer regular notation vs. tef files. I don't like tab much and also don't like the way tef view prints out notation -- way too big or too much space between staves.
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    I love playing scales and there is a never ending supply. I don't remember where I picked up the double stop do -re mi scale, but it has been more educational than any single note scale. It's all double stops. I will try and describe it, basically it starts with the two finger C chord and goes up the middle two strings to Dm, Em, F, then back down to the A and E strings at the G chord and up the A&E strings to Am, BM, C chord(7th and 8th fret). So.. sing do ri me when you play C, Dm, Em, F then down to G, Am, Bm, C. Play around with it and sing. It was around xmas time that I started this, so I was soon playing Silent Night using this double stop scale. Everyone soon pick it up and we started playing blues like the Saint James Infirmary. Use the G and D strings also starting with the F chord and up the fret board. I have discovered all kinds of fretboard logic using this scale, like where all the chords are up and down. I have started using the three finger chord now, but I am still slow . Try it and see what you can do. Everyone is at a different level, so many will already know this scale backwards and forward.
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    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    pefjr: I don't think i ever practiced double-stop scales but in fiddle and mandolin playing I often think of the chords that go along with the melody (I am also a guitar player). When I do take breaks, some of my improv works around double stops.

    Speaking of double stops, I have worked thru some of the etudes in this book, Melodious Double Stops, which are very nice. It is also excellent for those who want to read double stops in std notation.
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Garber View Post
    pefjr: I don't think i ever practiced double-stop scales but in fiddle and mandolin playing I often think of the chords that go along with the melody (I am also a guitar player). When I do take breaks, some of my improv works around double stops.

    Speaking of double stops, I have worked thru some of the etudes in this book, Melodious Double Stops, which are very nice. It is also excellent for those who want to read double stops in std notation.
    Some teachers call this a harmonizing scale, and it may be the same as a Melodious Scale. Basically it's two finger chords, but I have now added the third finger to make it an 3 finger chord scale. Starting at the F or C chord. When I get a chance I will take a look at that book, thanks. Maybe it will help me with my fiddling around.
    I have the world in a jug, and the stopper in my hand.

  11. #34
    Mandolinist out of Atl
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by jramsey View Post
    my third exercise is variation on Jethro Burns' "Exercise a la Ellington" in his book.
    I am also a huge fan of Jethro's warm-up scale exercises. Specifically the "Exercise a la Ellington," is helpful for playing with a unique timing, accenting certain notes without playing straight triplets.

    This can be applied to any piece one plays, in terms of straight triplets Jethro is also the master, here is a video where I show a way I like to use triplets in terms of simple major scales.http://jakecohan.com/info/2012/10/30...-useful-trick/

    Last edited by Mandolin Cafe; May-27-2019 at 9:59am.

  12. #35
    but that's just me Bertram Henze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Jake, I suspect that when you say "triplet" you really mean "triad".

    A triplet is an ornament of three quick strokes replacing 2 eighth notes; none of those are shown in your video.
    Here I found someone who explains it in detail (we can probably ignore whatever he is doing with the plastic mug).
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    I don't see how the term triad (arpeggio, broken chord, etc.) would come into play with this video... it's a scale/lick/eighth-note triplet exercise. Triplets can be played as quarter notes (three notes over two beats), eighth-notes (three notes in one beat), sixteenth-notes (six notes in one beat), etc. Jake's picking eighth-note triplets, but it would be helpful to have a metronome running to hear the rhythmic relationship of the lick to a beat. From a teaching standpoint, I would minimize the description of the scale (if they don't know the scale, they're not ready for this lesson), and maximize the description of the lick and the rhythmic applications in time (which you do a nice job of at the end). Nice picking and a nice sounding mandolin, hope to pick sometime, Jake.
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    but that's just me Bertram Henze's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Maybe I have misunderstood the wider meaning of slow triplets. In ITM (where I come from), triplets are fast - look what this guy (a cafe member) does on the G strings - those are what I know as triplets.
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Hi Bertram... the terminology I'm using comes from standardized music theory... has nothing to do with either bluegrass or ITM traditions. Triplets can function many ways rhythmically, slow or fast. The eighth-note triplets you are accustomed to are the same thing that Jake is playing in his video, he's just playing them at a slower tempo. In the last video you posted, if you tap your foot to the quarter-note (@ 200 bpm), he's playing eighth-note triplets (three notes for every beat).
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    At first listen/view, it just seemed to me to be a faster scalar thing. I would need to hear that lick played against a rhythm to really hear/feel the triplets.

    Obvious triplet thingies are

    - Ray Legere on the outro to his version of Jerusalem Ridge
    - Dawg on Rattlesnake
    - Wayne Benson on Lower On The Hog (a video floating around)
    - Alan Bibey on many things

    (albeit all of these in a grass setting)

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanN View Post
    I would need to hear that lick played against a rhythm to really hear/feel the triplets.
    The first note of each triplet is not very much emphasised, that's what puzzled me the first time. The very first one at the start of the video is better than the others.
    I would still describe them rather as eighth notes in a 6/8 time.
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Hi Jim and others

    Double stops? Wonderful. Many thanks.

    Vanillamandolin

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Thought of another triplet monster work-out: Dave Peters on Poppyleaf Reel.

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Hi thanks for the post on double stops! I am having huge fun - and it is certainly a nice alternative to moving up and down the scales in the conventional way.

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by Vannillamandolin View Post
    Hi thanks for the post on double stops! I am having huge fun - and it is certainly a nice alternative to moving up and down the scales in the conventional way.
    Vannnilla, this forum is a Gold Mine. I just found this in the Classifieds, Accessories: 12 Free PDF Books - Theory, Improvisation, Tunes, Jazz
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    [Oops, sorry. This was directed toward Perry. I don’t know how to tag members.]

    Apologies for digging up this very old thread, but can I ask you about your “excruciatingly slow” comment? I’ve been working on my picking, and if I go at 60 bpm, using the standard 4 strokes (down-up-down-up) per beat, that doesn’t feel excruciatingly slow to me. In fact, it’s pretty darn challenging. Am I doing this right, and just have to keep working on it and building, or are you talking about using only two or even one pick stroke per beat (which would indeed be blissfully or even excruciatingly slow)? Thanks.

  24. #46

    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Iíve begun to practice at 150 bpm (each click is an eighth note).
    Ive found Im making faster progress at this slower speed but even so I sometimes find it difficult to think, not about each note but the different patterns of 4, 6, or 8 notes, and how they repeat etc. AND at the same time rhythm, smooth flow, equal volume and the whole list of other things.

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by atsunrise View Post
    Iíve begun to practice at 150 bpm (each click is an eighth note).
    So, you are picking two notes (down-up) on each click? I guess that would be like four of my down-up-down-up picks for every click at 75 bpm, which doesnít feel terribly slow to me. I guess Iím a slug! Iíll keep working at it. Thanks.
    Last edited by wormpicker; May-26-2019 at 5:50pm. Reason: Typo

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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Always liked this, up and down.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Registered User Mike Rodbell's Avatar
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    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    Quote Originally Posted by Pasha Alden View Post
    Many thanks - so helpful - especially where no mandolin teacher is in sight. I am starting to think I need to find one on skype. Best
    I found ArtistWorks a nice alternative to skype. Took Mike Marshall's lessons for a year. He can take a while to respond to your videos, although I found his guidance to be incredibly useful. Also somewhat sheepish to admit that alot of what he shared I should have already known. Good posture, hand position, take it slow, alternating up/down on right hand, etc.

  28. #50

    Default Re: Scale Warm-Up Exercises - Your Favorites

    @Wormpicker, I mean that if I play a tune that has only 8 notes in it -a very short tune, and the eight notes are eights, then my metronome will click eight times at 150 bpm. And the eight notes will make up a 1 measure tune.
    BUT my metronome has three different sounds and a silence that I can program so the eight Ďclicksí can sound different and form, for example a rock or latin rhythm with emphasis on say 1, 2, 5, 8.
    Itís the emphasis at very slow speed that I want to learn.

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