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Thread: Prime Vibe test

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I have done 3 days with the Prime Vibe on the LM 400. This has become an incredible mandolin. It was really good to begin with and has improved substantially. To be honest, part of that improvement is due to the Prime Vibe and part of it to being played and played hard for a week. The two together have helped it substantially.

    The improvement from the PV has been noticeable and the volume and tone has increased over the test period. The increase was always more balanced than the TR from day one, though at first I did not think it would achieve the power difference I had seen with the TR. It has. It is not more than the other, but certainly equal to it. I hear the greatest increase in the A strings but it has become a bit more balanced after day 3 and with a few days hard playing.

    I am going to discontinue the LM 400 and put it on another instrument. Mostly because I play the LM400 and need it available all the time and cannot dedicate it to the test any longer. It has been used enough on this instrument to see the difference from before and after. I will chose another instrument today and then run the test for a week if possible. That will be a complete test and allow me to give a better evaluation as compared to the TR. I am also doing another instrument with the TR so I can do a side by side comparison of the two systems.

    Either system will do what they say they will from my initial observations of the PV. The end result seems to be very equal and they achieve the same goal with a bit different method. The TR costs more initially, but it is ready to go right out of the box. Nothing to hook up or wire or plug except the AC plug into the wall. The PV you do have to put it together. This is not hard or difficult though so that is not really an issue. You do have to provide a sound source for the PV, which you do NOT have to do with the TR. The PV is not ready to go right out of the box. By the time I factor in my expense for purchasing an MP3 player the cost is very comparable. This can be mitigated if you already have an MP3 player you can dedicate to this. I did not. I did not factor in the time and inconvenience of shopping for one and the gas to get it, etc. Again, not a big deal but the cost would not be that much more for a cheap MP3 player in the box so you have to go nowhere to get one to use with it. Another option would be to sell it with an MP3 for those who may need it, and without one for those who do not.

    The only other inconvenience in my mind is that it has to lay on its back. First, that takes space that is not always avialable, and the second, I think anything would work better if the back were not dampened by laying on it. The back vibrating more freely would, in my mind, be better if it could hang.

    I will post more as the test goes on. Tomorrow I will post what I am using it on next. Again, it seems to be a good product and between the two brands, very equal so far in its outcome. The things I find inconvenient may not be an issue with anyone else, but it is important for the consumer to know this out front. Thank you.
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  2. #27
    Registered User primeVibe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I humbly and respectfully desire to add to Big Joe's in-depth review that ToneRite requires the purchase of two different models to season mandolin and guitar, $149ea, or $298 total, vs. one primeVibe for $99 + user-supplied music source.
    $99 primeVibe seasons any guitar including solid body and bass, mandolin, ukulele, violin, viola, cello, double-bass, harmonica, and drums!
    James Romeyn, Founder/CEO
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    Guitar Forum Thread
    Mandolin Cafe Thread
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    Gibson Roy Smeck w/ primeVibe

  3. #28
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Actually... the TR can be used for either. The spacing on the rubber string inserts are set for the particular instrument, but can be used on either so one could be used for both. This is from information from TR. I am not defending them, but just for the sake or fairness for comparison. The PV is going on a guitar today so we will see if it has the same effect as on the mandolin. I was impressed with the similar results the TR gave from every instrument it was used with. I have no reason to think it would be any different with the PV. They seem to achieve a fairly similar end result but a bit different in how they get there. I am going to put it on a Recording King Acoustic six string guitar. It is a 12 fret slot head. These are pretty amazing guitars right out of the box so it will be nice to see if this gives the improvements I expect. I will post more on that tomorrow. It is nice to have options in helping our instruments open up and achieve thier full potential in our life time. Many of us cannot afford the money for vintage instruments, and many of us are a bit long in the tooth for a new instrument to open up with 30 years playing time. If the PV or TR help us achieve our goal of maximum performance then it is certianly worth the cost of either device. Thank you.
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Quote Originally Posted by hank View Post
    OK I gotta ask. What is the cruel looking device that poor guitar is being tortured with?
    Industrial type shaker (really a loud speaker coil type arrangement without the cone) silver bit below is an impedance head measuring force and acceleration connected by a stinger to the bridge. The sort of setup that is used to do experimental vibration and modal analysis work on structures (my day job!)

  5. #30
    Fret less, play more! NoNickel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Joe View Post
    It is nice to have options in helping our instruments open up and achieve thier full potential in our life time. Many of us cannot afford the money for vintage instruments, and many of us are a bit long in the tooth for a new instrument to open up with 30 years playing time.
    Would you, Big Joe, or anyone have any kind of idea on how to quantify some kind of play time to dedamping device ratio? Such as 1 hour on the TR or PV equals 1 week of normal play (at an hour a week). I know it is a stretch, but even something rough would be cool.
    NoNickel

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  6. #31
    Registered User primeVibe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Quote Originally Posted by NoNickel View Post
    Would you, Big Joe, or anyone have any kind of idea on how to quantify some kind of play time to dedamping device ratio? Such as 1 hour on the TR or PV equals 1 week of normal play (at an hour a week). I know it is a stretch, but even something rough would be cool.
    That's a very thoughtful question. I'm interested to read a reply. I'd not hazard a guess.

    Mandolin output is dominated by mid-range tones. primeVibe, similar to most audio systems, has its greatest dynamic capacity in the mid-range. Mandolin users might consider employing music program that lacks deep bass and/or is not bass-heavy. This will allow greater playback level before the onset of audible distortion, with the subsequent advantage of deeper seasoning action and better results than the same period employing bass-heavy or deep-bass music program, which would require a lower overall playback level.
    $99 primeVibe seasons any guitar including solid body and bass, mandolin, ukulele, violin, viola, cello, double-bass, harmonica, and drums!
    James Romeyn, Founder/CEO
    Debra Romeyn, Manager
    Facebook primeVibe
    Guitar Forum Thread
    Mandolin Cafe Thread
    Collings Forum, review bottom page 5
    Gibson Roy Smeck w/ primeVibe

  7. #32
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    NoNickel.... I don't know that there is an accurate answer to your question. Each piece of wood is different from others and different wood species respond differently to the stimulus which produces the end result. In order to achieve the same results as the artificial stimulators do it could take many months of hard playing. I believe the devices give you an insight to what the mandolin ( or guitar) will sound like after regular hard playing for a number of years. The constant vibrations... whether vibrating the top directly or indirectly through the strings and bridge...will develop the tone the instrument certainly has already withing its capabilities, but accelerates the process substantially. This will yield results far more immediate than just waiting for a natural aging process.

    On a different issue, my oldest son and family live in EL Paso, just north of Bloomington. Small world . I usually visit there about 3 times a year.
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  8. #33
    Fret less, play more! NoNickel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Wow, small world indeed. State Farm? Farmer? ISU? Musician? I fo by El Paso up Rte 39 all the time. Just diid it on Turkey day.
    NoNickel

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  9. #34
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Well, I finally got the PV on a guitar today. We will see what the results are. I still find two things that I don't like about the PV. First, is the space you have to dedicate to using the product. Since it has to lay on its back to work, you have to have a space large enough to use for that and space is always a difficult thing to find. Second, is the music coming through the instrument with the PV attached. I realize this is the design of the item, but I would rather not have the sound going. This is usually because we are busy and it can be distracting.

    On the positive side, the volume seems to be an indication of the PV working. We set it so there is very, very minimal volume when we begin the test. After a period of time the volume increases. It seems the more the volume increases the more the top is vibrating. This should be an indication that the PV is working and loosening the top so it vibrates more freely. This should produce more volume and a more open tone. It did on the mandolin. Of course, the guitar is larger with a larger plate that vibrates a bit more easily so the volume can be a bit more to begin with.

    In any product there are always trade offs that you have to deal with. That is why there are more than one kind of tools to accomplish a job. I am not picking on the PV, since it seems to be doing what it is supposed to do. It is just little irritations I find since it distracts me at times (Yes, I am ADHD!!!). In a shop environment instrumental music seems to help the guys concentrate on the work. Vocal music has a tendency to distract from the task at hand because the listener is concentrating on the lyrics. This can distract ones attention at a critical time and can lead to shop accidents. We play only instrumental music in the shop when we are working.

    We are all musicians and love nearly every genre of music, but we also don't want anyone injured by a sharp chisel or power tool by loosing concentration on the job at hand. Now you ask, "what has this got to do with my test?". Pretty simple. My MP3 is loaded with music and much of it is not instrumental. Therefore, much of it is vocal. This can be distracting to us and that I don't like. That is not the fault of the PV, but rather the fault of the user in the music selected to be used for the work at hand. Unfortunately, I did not have hours to go through and select only instrumental music for this test. I may not be a frustrated with the music coming through the instrument had I done so. Therefore, the fault is not the manufacturer, but the user. This is a real world test though and I wanted to do what I thought most buyers would likely do. My frustrations can also be positives. In certain environments the vocal music and volume would be a welcome trait. So, while I may sound like I am complaining about these issues, it is only from the perspective of the way the test is being done by the user to a great degree.

    I still don't like the idea that the instrument has to be lying on its back to work. For two reasons. First, the space you need to dedicate to this. If you have sufficient space it is not an issue. I don't.... at the shop or at home. That, again, is not the fault of the PV but of the user. Of course, most buyers may not think of this before trying to use the product. Second, laying on its back allows the top to vibrate pretty freely, but the back will not move as much. This could limit the effectiveness of the product over a longer period. With the instrument hanging the entire instrument can vibrate quite freely and can respond, to my mind, much more effectively.

    Ok, another long post. Again, it appears from initial applications that the PV works as advertised and that is the primary purpose of the test. The rest of the issues relate to ease of use and personal observations. I have complicated the test a little. I have taken the LM 400 mandolin that I used the PV on and played it heavily the last couple days. I have put the TR on it for a day to see if that makes any effect. That will not have anything to do with the PV, but just to see if the TR adds anything to what has already been accomplished with playing and PV application. I just have to satisfy my curiosity . I will do the same with an instrument where the PV goes on after the TR has been used.
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  10. #35
    Fret less, play more! NoNickel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Joe View Post
    On the positive side, the volume seems to be an indication of the PV working. We set it so there is very, very minimal volume when we begin the test. After a period of time the volume increases. It seems the more the volume increases the more the top is vibrating. This should be an indication that the PV is working and loosening the top so it vibrates more freely. This should produce more volume and a more open tone. It did on the mandolin. Of course, the guitar is larger with a larger plate that vibrates a bit more easily so the volume can be a bit more to begin with.
    Big Joe, I have also noticed a volume increase while the unit is working with the Tone Rite. When I first started using it, nobody in the house knew that the unit was on. Now the family constantly complains of the buzzing noise. That was only after about a week of constant use. And yes, the mandolin sounds much better when played. Deep and woody. Loud, loud, loud!
    NoNickel

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  11. #36

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    How about i just leave it in my room where I'm cranking up Led Zeppelin at 100dB
    kentucky km-550

  12. #37
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I wonder why nobody ever thought of that before.

  13. #38

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    or sit it on your washing machine during spin cycle or put in on the riding mower when you mow the lawn. I bet my week wacker could put some vibrations into that wood. how about an ultrasonic jewelery cleaner or my sonicare toothbrush.

    heheh
    kentucky km-550

  14. #39
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    In reality, the PV is very similar to putting your guitar on a stand and letting the speakers vibrate the instrument. The only difference is that the drivers are placed directly on top of the guitar or mandolin and the top of the instrument becomes a part of the speaker itself. The PV is similar enough that it makes one ask if the difference in technique is worth the effort, but it is more efficient than just putting on the stereo. Using the drivers directly on the top will move them more than just the pressure filtered through the air from the speaker to the instrument.

    I have always maintained that instruments kept on stands in the open in rooms where you actually live.... watch tv, talk, play music, run the stereo, will always make your instrument sound better than keeping it locked in a case unattended. First, the top is constantly vibrated, as are the strings and the entire instrument across all frequencies. Second, you are more apt to play an instrument that is already out than having to go dig it out of a case and then return it upon completion. Availability helps play time, which helps improve tone. The only down side is you may have to change strings a little more often from accumalated dust in the air. I think that is a small price to pay.

    Either the PV or TR can accelerate the breaking in period. They do the same thing only different . It is more effecient than just leaving it out in the room, but even that is a good help. I don't think I would suggest putting it on the washing machine though .
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  15. #40

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    from now on, i'm storing my mandolin on the table with my kickin cerwin vegas. I'll play Toto's bass slammer High Price of Hate to keep it ready. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=409nofDp1r0
    kentucky km-550

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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I've just finished 24+ hours with the PV on an acoustic guitar. The guitar is a rosewood with sitka spruce top. It is a decent guitar and sounded pretty good before we started. The PV has been running since I put it on early yesterday morning. I took the "speakers" off for a few minutes, tuned the guitar, and played it for a few minutes. It was a little louder, but not dramatically. It was a bit punchier in the mids, but again, not substantially. It will be interesting to see what the next few days will bring. Of all the instruments I've used the PV or TR on, this one has had the least dramatic change in the first 24 hours. Usually the most dramatic changes have been in the first day and a bit of balancing over the next few days.

    I also put the TR on the LM400 that had been treated with the PV earlier. After the first day the bottom end was enhanced and helped balance the A string a bit more. When the experiment with the PV began the mandolin was weakest on the E and A strings. Over the days with the PV the A string became dominant. It needed a little help at the start so that was not bad, but it was a bit overpowering after the test. Not really problematic, but definately stronger than the other strings.

    After the TR on the LM400 for a day, the strings are much more balanced and the bottom end has improved so now the strings are all fairly well balanced. Would this change have occured with another day on the PV? Possibly, but so far my experience is that the PV enhances more mid range tones rather than the bottom end. There could be many reasons for that including the selection of music being played through the PV. I have a rather broad genre of music in nearly every style. Much of it has mandolin, but also numerous other instruments. Part of it is bluegrass, but there is a lot of jazz, swing, gospel, and some country mixed in there. I love bass so I have a lot of music with acoustic upright bass. I would think the selection would give a balanced response since it is not overly heavy in any style or instrument being played and the mix is just the same as was on the original recording. I also have the MP3 played so it selects the songs at random rather than an entire album at a time.

    The prior experience with the TR has been that it enhances the low end first then begins to balance out and none of the registers seems to overpower the other. I did put the TR back on the LM400 today and it will be on there until I leave the shop this afternoon. The PV will be on the guitar over the weekend.

    Again, my results show both systems work. They approach the solution from a bit different angle, and they have a bit different response to the instrument but they both do what they claim to do. I still have the same minor irritations with the PV that I had to begin with, but that has nothing to do with its function or success. Either one will give a positive result in my opinion. What system is best for you depends upon your situation. The PV is cooler looking with its nice purple and shiny elements and wires all over that make it look very high tech . The TR is pretty basic and simple. It is all black, with only one wire and that is the one that goes from the TR to the switch and then to the wall socket. Fast, easy, and simple to use and requires a minimal of space. The PV requires a bit more table, or counter, or floor space but does look pretty cool and high tech. It would certainly generate more discussion from your friends and band mates as they see the bright shiny elements and the wires and you can go into great detail about how it is "scientifically" going to enhance your instrument. .
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  17. #42
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I have finished the test on the acoustic guitar. It is an inexpensive guitar that is pretty good. The treatment was about 3 days over a five day period. The results were pretty similar to the mandolin. There was an increase in volume and it was fairly even across the frequency spectrum. No one end was enhanced more than another. If anything maybe a bit of a boost in the mid range.

    I would love to have had more time to work with it, but the space requirements for an instrument lying on its back for a substantial period of time is hard to do. I have limited counter space and limited unused space in the shop. As work load increases the available space becomes a premium and we did run out of space.

    I will try another experiment in a few days or as soon as I can get the space available. The Prime Vibe works exactly as it claims from my determination. The frustrations I have may not be there for many, and many will have a spot where they can place it on its back for an extended period of time without issue.

    For me, I do not have the space at home for anything to lay on its back for any period of time. We have a relatively small home, and we have two grandchildren we are raising, so space is at a premium there. Anyplace I would put it would place the instrument in danger or be in our way for everyday living. If you have a room where you can use for music or other hobbies it will be fine, but I do not have that luxury. The same condition seems to be at the shop. We have a lot of instruments in the shop at all times. Often there is not any place to put another instrument because the work must come first. I have tried to allot a place for the experiment, but there certainly would not be any significant opportunity to use it in real world application for me. Again, that may not be the case with others, but is for me.

    My results to date have not changed from the first day I tested the device. It does what it says, and can help open the instrument. It seems to increase volume across the entire spectrum and if any area is enhanced more than the others it is a bit in the mid range. That was what I experienced from the first day through the experiments on two instruments.

    Now the comparison, again, between the Prime Vibe and the Tone Rite. The PV and TR both do what they say they will and do so on any instrument I have tested. The PV must be used with the instrument laying on its back. The TR can be used with the instrument hanging on a stand. The PV does not really enhance any frequency spectrum more than the others at any stage of the experiment. The TR enhances the bottom end first and then pulls the other spectrums up to the level of the bottom end.

    The PV requires a source for the unit to work. An MP3 or similar device. Many will have this available and that is not a problem. Many will not, and they will have to purchase one, which will increase the cost of the unit to about what the TR runs. The TR does not need anything to work right out of the box. The cost of the PV is 99.00 plus if you need to add an MP3. If you use Apples program the least expensive MP3 I found was 49.00. That would make the total cost about 150.00. The TR runs about 150.00 street price. Cost is really not much different when all things are considered.

    They both function and do so as advertised. For me, the TR is easier because of the space and not having to have an outside source for the vibration. If you have the space and the MP3 already, the PV would be about 1/3 less money. How much affect that really has is hard to say depending upon each persons situation. You, as the consumer, must determine that. The PV is very cool looking with its purple case. It looks much more high tech, but is in reality a small stereo unit with rubber drivers that vibrate the top and enhance the tone. You can listen to the music if you like while it is functioning. That may be a benefit for some, not for me. The TR looks pretty industrial and is just black and hangs on the instrument just doing what it does. It is pretty invisible unless you are looking for it.

    Again, I will try the test again as soon as I can get some space. If you are looking for an improvement in the immediate sound and volume of your instrument, then either of these devices can achieve that goal. It will not put something into your instrument that is not already there, but will help it open faster. I have been using one of these devices on a mandolin with a red spruce top. Red spruce has a tendency to be a bit tight when it is new or not played often. It takes a bit to warm up and begin to really achieve its best. If I play for 15-20 minutes it will suddenly open up and the volume is increased and the tone is enhanced. Using the device accomplishes this for me so it will be ready to go when I start to play. Saves me 15-20 minutes of playing to get it ready to go. Over time the red spruce will be opened and not need this time as long as it is played on a regular basis. The more it is played the less this will occur until you put it away for a period of time and it goes back to sleep. The devices can help overcome that sleepy state before you play. Either of these devices can be a useful tool for most musicians who play out and want the optimum projection and tone available.
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  18. #43
    Henry Lawton hank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Thanks Joe I enjoy these enhancement threads. I especially appreciate you taking the time and trouble to check these devices and processes out. These seem to be great for serious performing artist wanting to maximize their instruments before a show. On the other hand I wonder if continued use over long periods of time could cause an instrument to be played out similar to rumors we hear of Sam Bush's Hoss.
    Ha Ha! You should have seen the look on my wifes face when she asked me what I was writing about. I told her that we were discussing waking up musical instrument with electrical devices and whether these instruments will be worn out from not getting enough sleep.

  19. #44

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    After a week of playing Nickelback Darkhorse to my mandolin at 110 db, this mandolin sounds amazing ! :-)
    kentucky km-550

  20. #45
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I am amazed and delighted at Big Joe's depth of detail and time spent on this endeavor.

    The Electronic Ind. Assoc. Consumer Electronics Group defines relative SPL thusly: 100 dB = garbage truck, chain saw, pneumatic drill...120 dB = rock band concert in front of speakers, thunderclap. So...110 dB falls midway between the above, for Coachz' reference. The following is self-serving but could also aid in preventing hearing loss (hearing loss is accelerating in young people...once you loose it it's gone forever): may I humbly suggest primeVibe as an alternative to 110 dB SPL to season an instrument?

    From our webpage titled "Loudspeakers vs. primeVibe Transducers": This subject has come up enough that it seemed prudent to devote a page to it. A normal loudspeaker driver and primeVibe’s transducers share some electro-mechanical properties but their missions in life are mutually exclusive.

    Musicians often suggest seasoning an instrument by placing it close to high-output loudspeakers playing at high volume. My Senior Independent Product Rep Mark Allison said that Eddie Van Halen did this with his guitars. Someone mentioned that Doc Watson seasoned his guitars with a “transistor radio” in the sound-hole. I unashamedly admit this primeVibe journey started with me looking for a super high output headphone driver to fit in the sound hole (with the strings attached) to season my guitar in the body (not to develop a product for profit but rather only for personal use). This search soon ended in a brick wall, till NXT’s patented technology appeared, leading to the product about which you now read.

    Herein is the difference between loudspeakers and primeVibe transducers, supporting my conclusion that primeVibe’s positive audible benefit is multiples greater than any non-patented loudspeaker technology: Air presents an extremely high physical impedance to the transmission of sound pressure. 1% is a typical rate of efficiency for converting electrical energy into sound, explaining why high-power discrete analog power amplifiers are so large and generate much heat. This is explained in Wikipedia Section 5.3 HERE and is the reason normal loudspeakers, even at deafening sound pressure levels, vibrate an instrument less than primeVibe.

    Blame it on NXT’s patented technology. The transducers are almost silent when held in the air (see our video, sorry we desire not to finance a pro production right now). But when the transducers contact the guitar the sound is immediately obvious; the wood vibrates equal to a strong strum of all six strings (primeVibe is quieter than strumming because the transducers cause the vibration rather than the strings). The transducers are electro-mechanically designed to induce a high-density solid to produce sound, not to make sound when presented a low-density atmosphere as is the purpose of a normal loudspeaker.

    primeVibe is far more efficient than a regular loudspeaker at vibrating a solid, even if there was some method to safely and efficiently couple a regular loudspeaker to a solid, which appears to be impossible. This is because a regular speaker driver is engineered to make sound directly in the atmosphere, not to induce a solid to make sound. The vastly different mass between atmosphere and a solid demands a completely different electromechanical design to produce musical sound. NXT own well over 300 worldwide patents on any electromechanical device that induces a solid material into making audible sound. The fact the USPTO granted NXT’s patent also gives testimony to the differences explained herein. If a regular speaker and NXT’s technology shared similar purposes in life, no NXT patent would exist.

    The following clearly demonstrates: A regular loudspeaker is as efficient at inducing a solid to make sound as primeVibe is at causing sound in the atmosphere. In our demo video sound output is obvious with primeVibe transducers atop the guitar, but it is almost silent when the primeVibe transducers are lifted to contact only the atmosphere (notice me damp the strings to more accurately reflect the volume drop).

    A miniature full-range/high output/high-sensitivity loudspeaker would cost many multiples more than primeVibe. Even if such a loudspeaker was safely and efficiently made to physically contact an instrument, primeVibe would still season better. The loudspeaker would resonate wildly at certain frequencies (possibly even causing mechanical damage to the instrument) and other frequencies would be inaudible, with commensurate unpleasant results.

    Again, the above scenario is because of the mutually exclusive functions of generating sound with the atmosphere directly vs. inducing a solid to produce musical sounds. Regular loudspeakers are designed for the former, primeVibe is designed for the latter.

    primeVibe is also packaged attractively for musicians and of course the contact surfaces are specially tailored for the needs of fine instruments.
    $99 primeVibe seasons any guitar including solid body and bass, mandolin, ukulele, violin, viola, cello, double-bass, harmonica, and drums!
    James Romeyn, Founder/CEO
    Debra Romeyn, Manager
    Facebook primeVibe
    Guitar Forum Thread
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    Collings Forum, review bottom page 5
    Gibson Roy Smeck w/ primeVibe

  21. #46
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    I too think the PV would be better than just setting the instrument in front of speakers turned on to high volume. The high volume is not needed, and the drivers from the PV sitting on top of the soundboard of the instrument is far more efficient at low volumes than the speakers are at high volumes.

    Hank... wives don't always get it . In reality, I don't believe either of these devices, even frequently used for a long period, will cause an instrument to suffer from fatigue. Hoss still sounds pretty good and Sam still uses it quite often. I have played that mandolin and heard it many times, and it certainly has not fatigued. I have heard a good number of very expensive instruments that have suffered fatigue, but usually there are structural issues that are the cause of that.

    In the case of Hoss, as an example, it has been altered a good number of years ago. It has also been heavily, heavily used in the most extreme of situations. If there were anything to cause fatigue, these would be the things to do it. Normal instruments will never go through what that mandolin has. Most often the cause of fatigue is not playing time, but rather structural issues in the way that particular instrument was built. For example, if a top is too thin it can sound very good when it is new, but over time will begin to show signs of fatigue and if not properly handled, will suffer fatigue that can be heard in the tone and volume of the instrument. Improper bracing, loose neck joints, separations of glue joints, poor neck angle, excessive neck angle. All these can lead to what is called fatigue. If the structural issue is dealt with, then the issue resolves. Some times the fix is pretty simple, sometimes not. However, the resulting fatigue must be dealt with in order for the instrument to be functional on a continuing basis.

    In any case, the devices (PV or TR) will not cause this. It is caused by the instrument, not the device. One reason to ensure your instrument is in proper structural shape, and properly set up for optimal function before using these devices is to ward off any possible problem you may encounter by using these devices, or just by playing in normal use. These do no more than playing does, and actually is probably milder on the instrument structurally than hitting it hard and fast with a plectrum forcing the greatest volume out of it that we can .

    Whether awake or asleep, the mandolins do need to be in good condition. Then they really are designed to be played or stimulated by these devices. These do no more than what is done by playing. I would not worry about doing damage if done properly with either of these devices. I can see not possible damage to be done... except by dropping them on the instrument. Oh... and possibly forgetting you have the instrument laying on the floor being treated and step on it .
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

  22. #47

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Howdy all,I know i,am a green horn to the site and a beginner mandolin playing but I purchase a prime vibe and it awesome.I bought my wife a new ukulele and it needed to project a little more so I put a 100hr of music and it sounds great.A little hint chello music make it sound real good.We have a new ukulele builder in Nampa,ID and he is putting all his ukulele on primvibe. Thank Marc

  23. #48
    Registered User primeVibe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Marc
    Thank you for the up beat post!!!

    May we inquire the name of the ukulele builder in Nampa, ID? Nampa is just a few hours drive north of primeVibe's palatial world headquarters (i.e. this here well-worn vintage 2004 Dell XP computer, in my rather cluttered basement office).
    Last edited by primeVibe; Jan-20-2011 at 2:11pm.
    $99 primeVibe seasons any guitar including solid body and bass, mandolin, ukulele, violin, viola, cello, double-bass, harmonica, and drums!
    James Romeyn, Founder/CEO
    Debra Romeyn, Manager
    Facebook primeVibe
    Guitar Forum Thread
    Mandolin Cafe Thread
    Collings Forum, review bottom page 5
    Gibson Roy Smeck w/ primeVibe

  24. #49

    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    The name of the ukulele is 3GWOODWORKS.Right know I putting the vibe on a solid koa ukulele and let me say they got a winner here.I wish I had the money to buy this.Marc

  25. #50
    Registered User primeVibe's Avatar
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    Default Re: Prime Vibe test

    Quote Originally Posted by tcraft View Post
    The name of the ukulele is 3GWOODWORKS.Right know I putting the vibe on a solid koa ukulele and let me say they got a winner here.I wish I had the money to buy this.Marc
    Marc
    I spoke at length today with the senior principal at 3GWoodworks. Their ukuleles look absolutely gorgeous in the images, and appear to be superb value. I've been so busy with worldwide distributor queries since NAMM that I forgot his name and did not write it down.

    We proudly announce that 3GWoodworks will become the first known luthier employing primeVibe in their manufacturing process. Martin Guitar's Operations Chief received a primeVibe sample at NAMM. He said he will personally test it and he is of course a guitar player. We look forward to their feedback. I wonder if it's OK with Debra if Martin released a line of guitars with "pV" suffixes denoting 100 hours of primeVibe seasoning at the Martin factory? I wonder...

    The 3G principal mentioned an interesting story about the response by several ukulele players upon hearing your new ukulele seasoned for 100 hours with primeVibe. I'd be indebted if you retold that story here.
    Last edited by primeVibe; Jan-21-2011 at 12:55am.
    $99 primeVibe seasons any guitar including solid body and bass, mandolin, ukulele, violin, viola, cello, double-bass, harmonica, and drums!
    James Romeyn, Founder/CEO
    Debra Romeyn, Manager
    Facebook primeVibe
    Guitar Forum Thread
    Mandolin Cafe Thread
    Collings Forum, review bottom page 5
    Gibson Roy Smeck w/ primeVibe

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