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Thread: Speranze Perdute

  1. #51
    Joe B mandopops's Avatar
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    Default Re: Speranze Perdute

    A wonderful, A wonderful. I enjoyed that.
    Thanx for sharing.
    Joe B
    A Splendid Time is Guaranteed for All

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  3. #52
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Speranze Perdute

    Just discovered Matacea's (Natale Di Palma's) vocal version of Morelli's waltz, tucked away in a Germantown, Philadelphia Victorian attic. It is very brittle but will be carefully scanned so that we can all appreciate to what lengths these Italian music publishers went to preserve their heritage. In my spreadsheet (analysis of 17+ versions), I alluded to Matacea's 1920 edition but had no copies, only a LOC reference. Now we know! Del Colle's lyrics are preserved for posterity. Stay tuned as we scan this priceless edition. BTW, it contains a dedication to Philadelphia's Luigi (Luigino) Giorno whose mandolin was photoshopped the 1930s poster which appears on the cover for my "Italian Mandolin Heroes in America." Giorno traveled to Manhattan all the time to buy sheet music and hangout with musicians; he was friends with the Italian publishers and the more famous composers such as Luigi Canoro.

  4. #53
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Speranze Perdute

    The fascinating story behind this binder cover would be of interest to those of you who cherish heroic efforts. This leather, engraved binder cover with St. Mark's familiar lion contained several collections and sheet music. I'm uploading it here because Morelli's "Speranze Perdute" was preserved inside this binder in an old Germantown attic. It was originally sold at S.F. (Sante Fortunato) Vanni's, an Italian bookseller; in fact, Vanni's was founded in 1884 and known as the oldest Italian bookstore in America. Tesio probably bought his mandolin books there when he first arrived. Vanni's was first located at 548 Broadway and later moved to Bleecker Street. A family run business that served generations of Italians.

    The binder's owner, mandolinist and band leader Luigi Giorno, invested in specialized collections and various editions. As a consequence, he created one of the largest ballo liscio libraries on the East Coast; he protected numerous ephemeral manuscripts for future generations. Much of it uploaded to the ballo liscio thread in this forum.

    Retrieving these sorts of things require risks: all sorts of dust mites and allergens, broken attic ladders. Saving Italian culture, one title at a time. Stay tuned as we breathe life into these mummified remains.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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  6. #54
    Registered User Mandophile's Avatar
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    Default Re: Speranze Perdute

    https://www.dropbox.com/sh/tok6c2x0i...cPHH7Qj7a?dl=0 (Morelli folder) the new sheet music is attached here as well.

    This link takes you to the Morelli folder with 17 different versions of his waltz. Now, I've just uploaded the 18th version. A vocal piece published by Arturo Matacea. What makes this version special and stand alone are the lyrics. Giovanni Del Colle (a well-known Italian poet and maestro) wrote appropriate words to accompany this classic. While most of Matacea's music catalog contains Irredentist songs, this waltz keeps the theme of romanticism & a lost love.

    As a result of finding this rare copy, I will rewrite/modify the monograph and the Index to include this edition. BTW, Matacea kept the original barcarolle and seems to have based it on the Beuscher model. Published in 1920, shortly after it was in print, Matacea (aka Natale di Palma) left for Italy with his wife where he seems to have abandoned her. Nothing is known as to what happened during the volatile period of Mussolini's rise to power.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Speranze_Perdute.Matacea-DelColle.pdf  

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