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Thread: meguiar's

  1. #1
    Mandolicious fishtownmike's Avatar
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    Default meguiar's

    I have noticed that the Meguiar's products have seem to have changed or disappeared. I cant seem to find the old numbered products around my way. I found Meguiar's scratch X 2.0. has anyone used this? I have searched the forum but didn't find anything. If your using any of their new products what are you using for rubbing out the finish? I want to use the scratch X 2.0 on an oxidized finish with very fine scratching. Just want to be sure it's safe....Mike

  2. #2
    Café habitué Paul Hostetter's Avatar
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    Default Re: meguiar's

    I like ScratchX a lot. It seems to be a fortunate combination of #10 and #17. My local auto store still carries the earlier products, but I may just abide with ScratchX. No silicones—it's safe.
    .
    ph

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    Paul Hostetter, luthier
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  3. #3
    Mandolicious fishtownmike's Avatar
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    Default Re: meguiar's

    Thanks Paul.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: meguiar's

    I'm mystified by Meguiar's nomenclature (not to mention their spelling - everybody calls it "McGuire's"). The numbers seem to be just numbers, they don't progress from coarse to fine. Scratch Remover, Swirl Remover, Streak Remover, what the heck? By trial and error I had settled on #4 and #7 to rub out finish, but when my bottles are gone I'll have to start over and choose from whatever is in the store then.

    Paul, what's the deal with silicone? "Silicone" and "silicon" are often listed as ingredients in polishes, and I get the feeling they're not very careful about how they use the words. In an abrasive, you expect silicon carbide or aluminum oxide in various grit sizes. On the other hand, I know silicone as a polymer which can be a runny lubricant or a rubbery vulcanizing product ("silicone sealer" or RTV). I just want to know the size of the abrasive particles, e.g. 2000 grit or 8 micron, whatever, so I can use them in the proper sequence.

    If there's something unsafe in a rubout compound, I would suspect the carrier or matrix ingredient, which could have a finish-eating solvent or a nasty residue.

    John

  5. #5
    Café habitué Paul Hostetter's Avatar
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    Default Re: meguiar's

    John - I think the constantly changing product descriptions are a marketing strategy, a way to get more footage on store shelves. I agree it's completely puzzling, they must have launched hundreds by now, all just variations on a theme. Plus even the products change—their old red-brown #4 is nothing like the current pale gray #4.

    The primary thing to know about silicones is what you said: a nasty residue. They cling and become part of the finish and wreak absolute havoc with later lacquer work. From Wikipedia:

    Silicone
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Not to be confused with the metalloid chemical element Silicon.

    Silicones are largely-inert, man-made compounds with a wide variety of forms and uses. Typically heat-resistant, nonstick, and rubber-like, they are commonly used in cookware, medical applications, sealants, adhesives, lubricants, insulation, and breast implants.

    Silicones are polymers that include silicon together with carbon, hydrogen, oxygen, and sometimes other chemical elements. Some common forms include silicone oil, silicone grease, silicone rubber, and silicone resin.


    But you knew this much. Silicon grit isn't exactly a threat, but silicones in the formula really are.

    There are many, many ways to spell McGuire/Maguire/Maghoir/MacGwire/MacGuire/McGuiar, and Meguiar is another legitimate one.
    .
    ph

    º º º º º º º º º º º º º º º
    Paul Hostetter, luthier
    Santa Cruz, California
    www.lutherie.net

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