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Thread: right hand practice

  1. #26
    A DEAD HEAD
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    Default Re: right hand practice

    THANKS EVERYBODY-For all the good advice and where to go for some information.I don't know what i would do without everybody on forum
    Some people know a little about
    about a lot of things,i would rather
    know a lot about the little things
    BORN AGAIN CUB FAN

  2. #27

    Default Re: right hand practice

    Hello guys, i preferred to bump up this thread instead to open a new one.
    I'm learning mandolin and now i'm studing on the C. Munier, sadly it' very hard and doesn't explain very well tremolo tecnique.
    Now just today i have ordered from amazon the "The Complete Mandolinist" of Marilynn Mair but reading this thread i realized that she teach you to hit only one string on the upstroke when practicing the tremolo and i want learn to hit both the strings on the upstroke and downstroke.
    At first i was tempted for the S. Ranieri Method, but is an old book and they ask 27 + shipping fee.
    Does anyone here thinks that i should have ordered another book? I can't cancel the order
    I'm intersted to play classic music. should i have take another book, or this is fine and maybe i can take in future another book?

  3. #28
    Registered User Christian Flanagan's Avatar
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    Feb 2009
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    Englewood, CO
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    10

    Default Re: right hand practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Miked View Post
    I had a heck of a time getting consistent tremelo when I was using the Fender heavy picks. I would have it going and then kind of get stuck on a downstroke.

    Using a BC pick has made a night and day difference with the tremelo. The pick glides over the strings and you get a nice variety of tone with varying the angle. In general, my right hand technique has improved a lot since getting a BC.
    The pick seems to be one key to the technique. I'm a beginner. I started out with a very thin/flexible pick. It just seemed a little easier to get a clean note but tremelo was nearly impossible. I tried turning the pick at an angle and that seemed to help, but the sound suffered. I'd bought a couple of heavier picks with a more blunt point. Viola. I need to experiment more. Maybe that's the lesson. There's hundreds of variations on technique and tools. Gotta find that one that works for me.
    _____________________________________________
    I'm never lonely. My mandolin is always right there.

  4. #29
    Registered User MandoSquirrel's Avatar
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    Aug 2006
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    southwest florida
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    Default Re: right hand practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Nox View Post
    Hello guys, i preferred to bump up this thread instead to open a new one.
    I'm learning mandolin and now i'm studing on the C. Munier, sadly it' very hard and doesn't explain very well tremolo tecnique.
    Now just today i have ordered from amazon the "The Complete Mandolinist" of Marilynn Mair but reading this thread i realized that she teach you to hit only one string on the upstroke when practicing the tremolo and i want learn to hit both the strings on the upstroke and downstroke.
    At first i was tempted for the S. Ranieri Method, but is an old book and they ask 27 + shipping fee.
    Does anyone here thinks that i should have ordered another book? I can't cancel the order
    I'm intersted to play classic music. should i have take another book, or this is fine and maybe i can take in future another book?
    I think you'll find "The Complete Mandolinist" by Marilynn Mair a very workable book; you can still hit both strings if you want, she won't slap your fingers. She uses a lot of music from methods of similar vintage to the Munier, with her own text, & it looks like a good method book to me. I think you can work with just this one book for quite some time.
    Elrod
    Gibson A2 1920(?)
    Breedlove Cascade
    Washburn 215(?) 1906-07(?)
    Victoria, B&J, New York(stolen 10/18/2011)
    Eastwood Airline Mandola

    guitars:
    Guild D-25NT
    Vega 200 archtop, 1957?

  5. #30
    Middle-Aged Old-Timer Tobin's Avatar
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    Mar 2009
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    Kerrville, TX
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    Default Re: right hand practice

    No, no, no. Tremolo is the SOUL of the mandolin. Don't avoid the soul.
    That statement was profound. I had never really thought of it in those terms, but it's a very elegant way of putting it.

    It's funny; when my wife and I are in the car and I'm playing random mandolin music on the CD player, she makes sure to comment when she hears them do a tremolo: "I don't like that. It's too show-offy." My comment to her is usually, "Well, that's what mandolins do. It's the traditional mandolin style." But now I have a better way to phrase it to her. It's the soul of the mandolin.

    Profound, Phil. Thank you.

    *makes mental note to spend more time working on tremolo*

  6. #31
    Registered User MandoSquirrel's Avatar
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    southwest florida
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    Default Re: right hand practice

    I got a lot of right hand benefit(as well as left) from Evan Marshall's Duo Style book; polished my 30 plus year old getting by tremolo into a tremolo to enjoy, improved my triplets, really the whole right hand.
    Elrod
    Gibson A2 1920(?)
    Breedlove Cascade
    Washburn 215(?) 1906-07(?)
    Victoria, B&J, New York(stolen 10/18/2011)
    Eastwood Airline Mandola

    guitars:
    Guild D-25NT
    Vega 200 archtop, 1957?

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