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Thread: Weight of Loar versus new Master Model

  1. #1
    Registered User evanreilly's Avatar
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    I am wondering about the exact weights of the Loar-period F-5 mandolins and the current Master Model. How close in weight are they and what do they weigh??

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    The Waverly's make them a quite a bit heavier. (as an average)

    However, if you weigh ten Loars, you'll get ten different weights. If you'd like, Evan I'll weigh mine and let you know. If Darryl is up for it, he can weigh his, also, and Chris, and Brian, and Ken, and whoever else wants.

    I've never really looked at weight as a factor. One might assume if the correct grads, specie, etc., then the weight should average the same. In other words, I don't believe Gibson used weight as a specification in the '20s.

    Of course, I could always be wrong.

    Charlie

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    Registered User f5joe's Avatar
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    As a parallel to the question of weight: #Gibson Les Pauls are known for their sustain which is directly related to increased mass/weight of the instrument. #However, most LP owners search for the lightest guitar due to their hang-weight. #A direct contradiction.

    The only thing I've noticed between Loars and MM's is the slight increase in weight at the headstock. #Not a deal stopper for me.

    Joe Previtera



    ..... f5joe

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    The humidity in the area the instrument is stored is likely to have a greater difference in weight than nearly anything else. If a Loar and a MM were stored in the same environment you may get a fairly close and reliable means to weigh and compare. However, any two of the same instruments with different humidity levels will have a different weight. Then there is the density of the wood which can change within the same species....oh, it boggles the mind! Or, on the other hand, who cares? .
    Have a Great Day!
    Joe Vest

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    Formerly F5JOURNL Darryl Wolfe's Avatar
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    I'll get mine accurately weighed. I'd also like to challenge F5loar to weigh his July 9 also for comparative purposes. His seems to be extraordinarily light to me.
    Darryl G. Wolfe, The F5 Journal
    www.f5journal.com

  6. #6

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    Sounds interesting. My sidebound July 9 was incredibly light....
    How can I weigh mine accurately?
    Ken

  7. #7

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    Loar #73481 is: 2 pounds 4.0 ounces
    Paganoni #35 is: 2 pounds 5.6 ounces
    digital postal scale

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    Charlie, has anyone ever considered retro-fitting the Waverly tuners with titanium screw posts? Would this be possible?
    Wye Knot

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    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Okay... all this talk of weight makes me think of a grocery store. I take that Loar off the shelf and take it to the checkout and how much is it ... $20,000 per ounce?

    Jim
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  10. #10

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    No, I believe if you could buy a Loar by the ounce, it would be about $2,777.77 per ounce, more or less.

  11. #11

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    Math always stumpted me.....

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    On a serious note, ...that's a bit likre those $1,000 a pound ducks I used to shoot. But then, cost per pound isn't everything....

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    Registered User f5loar's Avatar
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    Okay dug out the baby scale and came out with:
    July 9th Loar at 2lbs. 3 oz and a Fern Loar at 2lbs.5oz.
    but heck the extra pearl and virzi on the Fern would
    account for that much more.
    I believe these are the most expensive 2 pounds on the planet! What else do you know that weighs 2 pounds and
    cost over $100,000? Well except Elvis's Sunglasses or tooth and oh yeah Monroe's Loar!

  14. #14

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    Did you weigh your Loar mandolins with or without pickguards? I forgot to say above that mine were weighed with all parts attached. The Pag has big frets. Finally....something fun to do with theses mandolins!

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    I just weighed 75317, a Feb. 18, 1924 without virzi but with pickguard. It weighed in at 2 lbs and 5 oz.

    Jim

  16. #16
    Registered User f5loar's Avatar
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    Pickguard on always! I can't pick without one anymore.
    And if you weight with those new Waverly's better note that.
    Also those rattlesnake tails. If it's a big one could add
    half an oz. And tailpiece on or off too.

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    82369 2.4 lbs

    73010 2.2 lbs (without pickguard)

    new Master Model 2.4 lbs

    76792 Virzi Fern 2.4 lbs

    Of course, this is all very unscientific. We should be using gram weights, not postal scales. It is, however, interesting.

    Charlie




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