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Thread: Samuel Siegel Ad

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    Professional History Nerd John Zimm's Avatar
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    While playing around (read: researching) something at work, I found this scan of an ad for a Samuel Siegel concert:


    I checked the Madison and Milwaukee papers to see if I could find a description of this concert but couldn't find anything. Makes me think that maybe this venue was in Chicago or some other nearby metropolis.

    -John.
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    Groovy. Thanks, John.

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    Registered User John Flynn's Avatar
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    Here is a link to a Photoshop'ed flyer that was originally for Samuel Siegel, but was changed to "Samuel Rigel" for the Rigel website. It also has the head of of a guy named Mike Ryan superimposed.
    http://www.rigelinstruments.com/rogues/article_37.shtml

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    Registered User floyd floar's Avatar
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    Mando Johnny: It was cool to see your research. My late Mandolin teacher, Walter Kaye Bauer b.1899, was a pupil of Seigel, maybe his foremost. Mr. Bauer idolized Seigel and held him as the greatest of all the virtuosi. Mr.B also knew Lloyd Loar well and played in LL's mando quartet, The Gibsonians. I can't recall who played 1st and 2nd mando, being either Loar or Bauer. I only wish now I had gleaned more from Mr.B. To me, he was like having Haydn for a teacher. He's the Dean of American Classical Mandolin teachers. Thanks again for sharing that. Chordially yrs, FF

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    I want to know more about the "mandolin duetists".

    How young were they?

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    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by (Buckley @ Feb. 09 2006, 18:17)
    I checked the Madison and Milwaukee papers to see if I could find a description of this concert but couldn't find anything. Makes me think that maybe this venue was in Chicago or some other nearby metropolis.
    I found this bio of Charles Hambitzer (originally of Beloit) on the Library of Congress site.
    Quote Originally Posted by
    Biographical Note
    Charles Hambitzer was born in Beloit, Wisconsin (his birth year is variously given as 1878 and
    1881), to a musical family; his great-grandfather was a violinist at the Russian court and his father owned
    a music store in Milwaukee. After studying with Julius Albert Jahn and Hugo Kaun, Hambitzer played in
    the orchestra of the Arthur Friend Stock Company, and taught piano, violin, and cello at the Wisconsin
    Conservatory. In 1908, he moved to New York City, where he joined Joseph Knechtís orchestra at the
    Waldorf-Astoria, frequently appearing as a piano soloist. At the same time, he opened a music studio on the
    Upper West Side, and among his many pupils was the fourteen year-old George Gershwin, who began his
    studies with Hambitzer in 1912. In 1914, Hambitzerís wife died of tuberculosis, and in 1918 he succumbed
    to the same disease, exacerbated by an emotional breakdown. It has been widely suggested that his death
    caused the young Gershwin to abandon his own budding career as a concert pianist.

    Hambitzerís feverish approach to composition seems to reflect a prodigious musical talent. His works
    include orchestral tone poems, incidental music for plays by Shakespeare and others (his Twelfth Night Suite
    was used for a Sothern and Marlow production), two operettas, and numerous songs and short instrumental
    compositions. Although a number of his tone poems were performed by the New York Philharmonic and his
    operetta, The Love Wager, toured the United States, few of Hambitzerís works were ever published, since
    he seems generally to have lost interest in a piece upon its competition. Although he was under contract to
    compose theatrical music for the Shubert Organization, nothing resulted from this arrangement; this
    uncharacteristic lack of productivity has been attributed to creative and personal differences. In the 1930s
    it was reported that a number of Hambitzerís manuscripts were in the possession of his family, although some
    relatives believed that his most significant scores had been retained by Joseph Knecht.
    John, where are you working that you have access to this program. Also, do you have a scan of what Mr. Siegel and the others played on the program that night?
    Jim



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    Professional History Nerd John Zimm's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by
    John, where are you working that you have access to this program. Also, do you have a scan of what Mr. Siegel and the others played on the program that night?
    Jim
    Hi Jim,

    I was in Florida for a week, so I am a little late in responding to this.

    I work for the Wisconsin Historical Society. I found this ad in a collection online that is free and open to anyone called Wisconsin Local History & Biography Articles. This basically consists mainly of newspaper articles collected by WHS staff in the 1890s.

    I unfortunately don't have a copy of the program for the concert. I was hoping that it took place in Madison or Milwaukee as the newspapers for these two cities were pretty good about reporting on cultural happenings in the city. I hope to ask a few people here who are more knowledgeable that I if they have heard of the Carlton Club-I checked google and only found references to a place in England and possibly Chicago.

    I'll let you know if I learn anything else. I may have time in the near future to check the Chicago papers to see if they shed any light.

    -John.
    Ah! must --
    Designer Infinite --
    Ah! must thou char the wood 'ere thou canst limn with it ?
    --Francis Thompson

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    John, I went to the link for the ad and there is a 2nd page which lists the program for the concert. #I'm not on my computer so I'm not sure I can post it but I'll try.
    --Linda
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    Professional History Nerd John Zimm's Avatar
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    Woah, good work. #I should have looked more closely at that. #Thanks for posting it.

    I just spent several minutes searching proquest for anything about the concert and I found a program printed on November 20, 1901 for a Siegel concert. #It is too large to post, so tomorrow hopefully I can resize it and post it.

    Thanks again for posting the second page. #

    Judging by the ad for the Milwaukee music store, it would seem most likely that the concert was held in Milwaukee. I'll have to check the papers again. I could have missed the writeup. It would be interesting to see what a reviewer had to say about Siegel's performance.

    -John.



    Ah! must --
    Designer Infinite --
    Ah! must thou char the wood 'ere thou canst limn with it ?
    --Francis Thompson

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    Ha! did it. The concert must have been in Milwaukee since it has a Milwaukee ad. It's interesting to me that the Vesta store on Grand Ave. and the store that Hambitzer's father owned were close to the violin shop I work in. That area must have been hopping at one time. Those old buildings are now turning into condos....
    --Linda

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    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Excellent work, Linda. Just what I wanted to see.

    Jim
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    Default Re: Samuel Siegel Ad

    As there was already a Samuel Siegel thread up and running I thought people may find it interesting to listen to some of his pieces. These ar the lighter end of the scale as they had to aim for the popularity stakes to guarantee the sales. Anyway you can still hear he had plenty of what it takes....

    Samuel Siegel at the Library of Congress Archive
    Eoin



    "Forget that anyone is listening to you and always listen to yourself" - Fryderyk Chopin

  15. #13
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Samuel Siegel Ad

    There are a bunch of Siegel's vylinder at the UCSB archive. I donated a few of mine to them a few years ago.
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
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    19th Century Tunes - Old Sheet Music for mandolin

    Playing lately:
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