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Thread: Punch brothers

  1. #26

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    5 people with acoustic instruments and 1 microphone = badass. This will inspire young musicians to pick up instruments again and create music.

  2. #27

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    A bit dated (2015) interview with NB in The American Interest. He seems to be a fan of the Punch Bros., generally.

    PG: Do you have any advice for young musicians who are playing bluegrass music?

    NB: I would hesitate to say, not knowing the people and not knowing what they sound like and what they do. And bluegrass is such a broad term nowadays, too. What anyone’s concept of bluegrass is, and what he wants to play, and where his head is, all that’s an unknown factor to me. I’d have to hear them to know if they want to play the old stuff or if they play what folks call bluegrass these days—since bluegrass has gotten to be sort of a fad music that lots of folks play, and they call it by that name.

    Don’t get me wrong; I’m not saying that the new stuff is not good. There’s some of the greatest musicians in the world, young people, playing today. They’re trying to make a living, just like I did. I mean my favorite band right now of the young people is The Punch Brothers. I think that’s a wonderful group. Chris Thile is a genius and so is everyone in that band, but they don’t get out there and say, “we’re playing bluegrass.” They’re playing what they play, and they play it damn well. Nobody plays it better. But there’s a lot of things masquerading as bluegrass, under the influence of commercialism, that are getting credit for being bluegrass—and some of that I don’t get in line with quite as hard. It’s just hard for me to like it. I’m too traditionally oriented, I guess.

    https://www.the-american-interest.co...t-rural-sound/

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  4. #28
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Quote Originally Posted by dang View Post
    Do tell!
    http://steeplestreetmusic.com/

    https://www.westbendmusic.org/

    Hi! I would never post these on here but since you asked, here they are. Moderators, if for any reason this is violating the café rules by all means remove it..

    Best,
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  6. #29
    NY Naturalist BradKlein's Avatar
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Great quote from Norman Blake in post 27 above ^^^. And thoughtful. He's separating the idea of labeling for commercial reasons (and making a living is important and valid in this world), from the music. (perhaps I'm stating the obv, but at least I'm being brief! ;-) )

    One other thing. It never occurred to me to rate this against Norman or Tony's versions of the song. For me, it's going to be the rare song outside of Dave Brubeck's, in 5/4, that becomes part of my regular listening. But that doesn't mean I don't enjoy the stretch. It's something of a continuation of the process that Tony started by added his own unique syncopation/timing to Norman's song many years ago.
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  8. #30
    bon vivant jaycat's Avatar
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Quote Originally Posted by BradKlein View Post
    For me, it's going to be the rare song outside of Dave Brubeck's, in 5/4, that becomes part of my regular listening.
    So, you don't play "Do What You Like" by Blind Faith every day?
    "The paths of experimentation twist and turn through mountains of miscalculations, and often lose themselves in error and darkness!"
    --Leslie Daniel, "The Brain That Wouldn't Die."

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  10. #31

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    It seems like most here were very familiar with Norman Blake and Tony Rice versions here before hearing the PB version. I'm coming to it a little bit differently so I thought I'd throw in my perspective/experience with this PB version. I was a fan of Punch Brothers before I was a bluegrass fan.

    When I first started getting into "bluegrass" and flatpicking, etc, I checked out the Tony Rice version. It didn't do much for me personally (the song itself - I thought Tony's playing was great), and I moved on to other things.

    I knew PB were working on a new album, and when I found out that it was going to be an album of covers, I was disappointed - especially since they were covering something that hadn't resonated with me. I listened to this and didn't like it at first... but something about it stuck with me and I gave it another chance. Now I really like their interpretation of the song, and it got me to go back and re-listen to the Tony Rice version and appreciate it.

    The end section of the PB version feels poignant to me, knowing Tony Rice was a family friend / mentor of Critter growing up.
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  11. #32
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    For me, the thing is that this new version affects my interpretation of the song, puts the lyrics in a more desperate light, darker. So while I enjoy the original versions, I am not sure I felt the full weight of the lyrics till this version.
    Life is short, play hard. Life is really really short, play really really hard.

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  13. #33

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD View Post
    For me, the thing is that this new version affects my interpretation of the song, puts the lyrics in a more desperate light, darker. So while I enjoy the original versions, I am not sure I felt the full weight of the lyrics till this version.
    Same here
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  14. #34

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    I had skipped over this until now. Heard the count-off in 5, and thought, WHAT? CT puts Norman Blake and Dave Brubeck in a blender and hits "pulse" a couple times... (I just love this version, even though I'll never be able to play it, and I truly feel the same about NB's and TR's versions.)
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  15. #35
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Thile's right hand barely moves during that solo. I swear I see a moment where he's only moving the pick with his fingers
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  16. #36
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    I'm a huge Punch Bros fan but I've gotta say, when I first heard this I thought it was "meh" compared to the Tony Rice version. Then it came on again and I liked it a little more. Now, after a few more plays I can't stop listening. I love this version. If I had never heard the Tony Rice version I think I would have loved this right out of the gate but it is hard to not compare. Like other people said, it is not supposed to sound like the Tony version, it is a re-imagining of the album so you really have to try and listen as though it is its own thing and not compare. I was able to listen to Any Old Time with that mindset and enjoyed it right away.

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  18. #37
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Wow I thought that was fantastic, looking forward to seeing them on tour in January!

  19. #38

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    What on earth does ' meh ' mean ?

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  20. #39
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    I suspect that it’s a corruption of the French word “Merde”. (Thomas Beecham/Stockhausen and all that.)

    At least they finally seem to work out what the tune is!

  21. #40

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    It signifies indifference. From the dictionary: expressing a lack of interest or enthusiasm
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  22. #41
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Music is a progression. Every generation builds on what has come before.
    I hear a bit of Phillip Glass in there.
    For the mandolin in the US, Bill Bolick > Bill Monroe > Jethro Burns > David Grisman > Chris Thile . . . who's next?
    I realize my list is quite abbreviated. Y'all can add your favorites wherever they fit in.
    I miss Peter Ostroushko. He cast his net wide, and did it very well.
    Norman Blake has listened to more kinds of music than most folks realize.
    Tom Scala, an Italian mandolinist who ran a shoe repair shop in Chattanooga, was a big influence on him during his youth.
    Those of us who are getting older tend to settle into whatever we are most comfortable with.
    I've played Brubeck, Bach, Beatles, and blues. Today I like clear, simple sounds on a good mandolin or flat top guitar.
    I still consider learning the Bach Chaconne, but that's a lot of work. I might leave it to younger folks.
    I've been teaching for 30 years. I love to see young musicians exploring and searching for new horizons. That's how the art grows.
    The mandolin has come a long way since I first strummed a G chord nearly 50 years ago.
    Last edited by rcc56; Nov-14-2021 at 12:46pm.

  23. #42

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Beppe Gambetta departed a lot from Tony and Norman's versions also. Beppe always introduces it by telling how he called Norman up before he released it and got his approval. Norman told him something to the effect of anything you do will be just fine.


  24. #43

    Default Re: Punch brothers

    Quote Originally Posted by jaybp30 View Post
    ...when I first heard this I thought it was "meh"... ...Then it came on again and I liked it a little more. Now, after a few more plays I can't stop listening. I love this version.
    AM (Top 40) radio has relied on that reaction for decades.
    "I play BG so that's what I can talk intelligently about." A line I loved and pirated from Mandoplumb

  25. #44
    Registered User Ken_P's Avatar
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    Default Re: Punch brothers

    For anyone who was hesitant about the title track, this will probably be a welcome relief:



    No tricky rhythms, no unusual chords, just a great slow groove with killer harmony singing and perfectly restrained solos. I loved what they did with Church Street Blues, personally, but I can't imagine any objection to this. I think it's just beautiful.

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  27. #45
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    Default Re: Punch brothers



    I challenge everyone not to get into this version.

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