Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 41 of 41

Thread: Frank Wakefield

  1. #26
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,906

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Fairly recent interview with Wakefield about the early DC days with Red Allen et. al.:


    There are many Wakefield YouTube videos available, also including live WDON broadcasts back to the 1960's; check out this link.

    Legendary banjo pioneer Bill Keith played banjo on the Allen/Wakefield version of New Camptown Races on the '60's Folkways album. Pete Kuykendall, co-founder of Bluegrass Unlimited and under the performing name of "Pete Roberts," was the Kentuckians' usual banjo player at the time.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  2. #27
    Registered User T.D.Nydn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Upstate N.Y.
    Posts
    1,299

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    I saw Frank play in the early ‘70’s at a coffee house in Saratoga n.y. called Cafe Lenas..I thought he was great until he made his little daughter sing..his flagstaff tune is probably “catnip”,a tune I’m always playing is a lot of fun…

  3. #28
    Registered User Glassweb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    2,867

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Grieser View Post
    Listen to Frank's breaks on Little Maggie, the first song on the album Glassweb mentioned. Pure Frank genius.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D38mQV2-Y04

    Right on Don! When I first heard the opening notes of this cut as 19 year old in NYC it was like I had just dropped musical acid. I mean who else would ever choose the notes that Frank played. And to anyone reading here that thinks "aw shoot, that ain't no part of nothing" I beg you to go on YouTube... slow down the cut and learn Frank's breaks note for note. I guarantee it will forever change you both as a musician and, especially, a mandolinist.

  4. The following members say thank you to Glassweb for this post:


  5. #29
    Registered User Glassweb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Location
    Bellingham, WA
    Posts
    2,867

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Mitch Stein View Post
    If you like that stuff,
    um, as much as I love Eva Scow's playing (another genius) this is a thread about Frank Wakefield thank-you...

  6. #30
    Resident Hack
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    153

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Glassweb View Post
    um, as much as I love Eva Scow's playing (another genius) this is a thread about Frank Wakefield thank-you...
    Um, no it's not. When the OP asks "Also, as a relative newcomer, who else should I be listening to?", it moves beyond the simple title of the thread. Did you actually read the OP?

    I notice you also snipped the part of my reply that references OP learning other bossa nova tunes, like "Corcovado" and "Desafinado".
    What I play
    2021 Skip Kelley Two-Point
    Eastwood 'Ricky'
    Morgan Monroe RT-1E
    Epiphone Genesis guitars
    Various Basses

  7. #31
    two t's and one hyphen fatt-dad's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Richmond, Virginia
    Posts
    7,578

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Frank would get his mix all talked up, that's for sure!

    I like listening to the classical mandolin player Ekaterina Skliar. Just watching her technique is amazing to me.

    I really like the Skaggs & Rice album.

    I was always a big fan of early Seldom Scene and John Duffy.

    I mostly play; however. . .

    f-d
    ˇpapá gordo ain’t no madre flaca!

    '20 A3, '30 L-1, '97 914, 2012 Cohen A5, 2012 Muth A5, '14 OM28A

  8. #32
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,906

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    We all know that Frank baked his Lloyd Loar F-5 in an oven, right?

    Attempting to enhance its tonal response, I understand...
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  9. #33
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Howell, NJ
    Posts
    24,884

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    We all know that Frank baked his Lloyd Loar F-5 in an oven, right?

    Attempting to enhance its tonal response, I understand...
    I stood totally amazed as he told that story at Windgap several years ago. He also made the bridge top out of plastic.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  10. The following members say thank you to MikeEdgerton for this post:


  11. #34
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Chicagoland north
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dog Dave View Post
    ... Also, as a relative newcomer, who else should I be listening to? ... considering that Brazilian bossa nova is one of my "guilty pleasures", I have learned to play along with various recordings of Manha de Carnaval and look forward to learning other bossa nova tunes, like "Corcovado" and "Desafinado". Anyway, the thoughts of experienced mandolinists would be most helpful and instructive. Thanks, y'all!! ....Old Dog Dave
    As to who else you should be listening to, and addressing your Brazilian urges with a side helping of diversification:

    As Mitch Stein pointed out, Eva Scow does some very nice Brazilian flavored music, and you should definitely have:
    Eva Scow + Dusty Brough -- Sharon by the Sea

    The best version of Manha de Carnaval that I recall hearing is by Don Julin (he calls it Black Orpheus), who also does a great version of Triste on:
    Don Julin & Ron Getz -- Mr. Natural This album also has some great guitar playing and other very tasty tunes.

    Don Julin's Vibe album also has the best stringed instrument version of Birk's Works if you are feeling like jazz. Other great tunes as well.

    And of course, Don Stiernberg also likes to mix in some Brazilian style music, and works with great players. For example, check out
    Straight Ahead (Estamos Ai, Vibracoes)
    Mandoboppin! (Bix in Rio, Magnanimous)

    Additionally, your interest in Brazilian music might lead you to diversify into Choro, in which case you should of course be listening to Choro Das Tres.
    Last edited by Alfons; Sep-12-2021 at 4:33pm.

  12. #35
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    12,250

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Them weary notes...

  13. #36
    Registered User Jim Roberts's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    746

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Frank sure dug deep and pulled tone out of that mandolin on Little Maggie.
    Last edited by Jim Roberts; Sep-12-2021 at 10:39pm.

  14. The following members say thank you to Jim Roberts for this post:


  15. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    May 2021
    Location
    Olympia, WA
    Posts
    32

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Oh, yeah!! She did a great job on Triste (I believe that's the song she's doing). Bossa nova just has a compelling, sashay-like beat to it. Kind of makes me want to just lightly bop down the street feeling good. Pretty good stuff for an old Kentucky hillbilly such as myself. Thanks for sharing, Mitch!!
    Old Dog Dave

    "The roots of music are embedded deep in the soil of human experience. The musician who taps those roots draws from life itself. That is the true 'soul man'." Old Dog Dave, from many years ago

    Gibson F-9, 2004
    Weber Gallatin A
    Bruhn double-point
    The Epiphone MM-30

  16. #38
    Mando-Afflicted lflngpicker's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    So Cal
    Posts
    2,017
    Blog Entries
    6

    Smile Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Glassweb View Post
    um, as much as I love Eva Scow's playing (another genius) this is a thread about Frank Wakefield thank-you...
    I understand the point Glassweb is making because I too was guilty of hijacking this thread (above), unintentionally. However, I thank you so much for sharing this video. I was unaware of this amazing Jazz Mandolinist, Eva Scow, but I am so glad to be introduced to her! Thank you!
    Last edited by lflngpicker; Sep-13-2021 at 11:34am.
    2020 Pava Pro A5 Torrefied Varnish
    1930's Stradolin A5
    1912 Gibson A Oval

  17. #39

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeEdgerton View Post
    I stood totally amazed as he told that story at Windgap several years ago. He also made the bridge top out of plastic.
    Back when Frank worked for a certain manufacturing company he designed, built, and sold (gave away?) novel bridges fashioned from the wide variety of synthetic materials he had access to at the time. He's always experimenting with his setup. From baking his Loar (pioneering DIY torrefaction lol) and making bridges, down to the Fast Fret string lube and the 1mm textured Dunlop picks he uses, I'd say Frank has a healthy obsession with getting the best tone possible out of his Loar. And no Regrets! He swears to this day that baking the mandolin did, in fact, make it sound better. (To be clear, we're talking about a 200 degree oven with the door cracked for 20-30min tops, beef jerky style, nothing crazy :-) I suppose the maple seam on the back did start separating significantly sometime after the said kitchen bake, but who knows: Frank has played the absolute s**t out of that Loar. Compared to Franks's playing style, baking is gentle.

    Back to his bridges, there's a particularly priceless moment on one of his lesson DVDs in which Frank is caught admiring his new bridge with an unscripted aside. I'll try to post it here.



    I love this! He's so happy with his new all-maple bridge he forgets to talk backwards!
    By the looks of the the notches on the saddle I'd say he made it himself!

  18. The following members say thank you to Joy Soldier for this post:


  19. #40
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    Chicagoland north
    Posts
    229

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dog Dave View Post
    ... I was a big fan of Frank's work. But, as a relative newcomer to studying and learning to play the mandolin, I am curious how his work stands alongside artists like David Grisman, Sam Bush, Chris Thile, and one of my latest favorites, John Reischman. ....Old Dog Dave
    You can hear Frank, literally "alongside" several of those artists, on a great version of Dusty Miller, and he also does a couple of his own tunes on this album, which is great fun:

    Bluegrass Mandolin Extravaganza
    https://acousticdisc.com/product/blu...anza-download/

    Full CD Booklet:
    https://acousticdisc.s3-us-west-1.am...TRAVAGANZA.pdf

  20. The following members say thank you to Alfons for this post:


  21. #41
    Registered User Tom Hart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sylvania, OH
    Posts
    84

    Default Re: Frank Wakefield

    If you haven't tried listening to Danilo Brito, you should. His bandolim playing is incredible. Sorry, not savvy enough to include a sample.

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •