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Thread: 3 Schweizer Halszithern (Swiss cittern family instruments)

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    Jo Dusepo, luthier Dusepo's Avatar
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    Default 3 Schweizer Halszithern (Swiss cittern family instruments)

    Some pictures I recently received which I thought you might like so am sharing with permission of the owner. A Kriesner Halszither (1922), a Toggenburger Halszither (date unknown) and a Emmentaler Halszither (around 1850).





    I am a luthier specialising in historical and world stringed instruments. You can see more info at my website.

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    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: 3 Schweizer Halszithern (Swiss cittern family instruments)

    Are those tuning pins on the Kriesner?
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    Jo Dusepo, luthier Dusepo's Avatar
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    Default Re: 3 Schweizer Halszithern (Swiss cittern family instruments)

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    Are those tuning pins on the Kriesner?
    The Kriesner is the guitar-shaped one. Assuming you mean the one shown in the last picture (I think that's the Emmentaler*, mmm cheese), then yes. Wouldn't be my first choice either!

    *Edited to add: I have confirmed with the owner who is one of my customers, that is indeed the Emmentaler.

    Perhaps it makes more sense when you consider that many later members of the cittern family (Waldzither, Portuguese guitar, English guittar) had Preston/fan/leque tuners, it doesn't seem too much of a change to use another method requiring a key. Perhaps also because whilst in English, zither means the family of instruments played on the lap or a table with open strings, in German it means this and the cittern family (as shown in the names: Halszither = neck-cittern/zither, Waldzither = forest cittern/zither).
    I am a luthier specialising in historical and world stringed instruments. You can see more info at my website.

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    Registered User John Kelly's Avatar
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    Default Re: 3 Schweizer Halszithern (Swiss cittern family instruments)

    The Kriesner looks like it will be an interesting repair/restore job, Jo. Will you remove the soundboard to repair those cracks (Assuming you are going to be doing this)? What sort of bracing will be under there?
    I'm playing all the right notes, but not necessarily in the right order. - Eric Morecambe

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