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Thread: ? Changing strings

  1. #1
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    Default ? Changing strings

    Using the search, I found a couple of old topics that talked about wrapping the string around the peg, and then running it through the hole.
    And it seemed there were many that agreed that this was an excellent way to do it, but nobody elaborated on what to do with the string once you run it through?

    Confused.....

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    When you run it thru the hole in the tuner make sure it is on the top of the winds of the string around the tuner. Keep the string tight when you wind it and try to keep it tight as you put the end thru the hole in the tuner. Pull it tight as you can, tune it up and cut the excess off.
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    Registered User mandolin breeze's Avatar
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Here's another super easy, quick and effective method. Aside from being very easy and quick, there is a lot less slack in the string (no multiple windings necessary) so there is a lot less tendency for it to slip off the pin while changing.


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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by mandolin breeze View Post
    Here's another super easy, quick and effective method. Aside from being very easy and quick, there is a lot less slack in the string (no multiple windings necessary) so there is a lot less tendency for it to slip off the pin while changing.

    I've used this method with great success many times.

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by mandolin breeze View Post
    Here's another super easy, quick and effective method. Aside from being very easy and quick, there is a lot less slack in the string (no multiple windings necessary) so there is a lot less tendency for it to slip off the pin while changing.


    Yeah, I used to use that method. I think most folks did, back in the '70s and '80s. It's fairly laborious and time-consuming. Years back, I switched to the method described at the top of this thread by the OP -- tension the string lightly by hand and wrap it around the post FIRST, then run the string through the hole. It's WAAAAY faster (wanna race?!) and holds just fine. No judging how much slack to leave in the string before winding. No fancy luthier's knots required. No slippage of the end of the string off the tailpiece. Better in every way!!

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Time consuming is an accurate description of the lock down method. Changing strings for me is a lot like trimming citrus trees and cutting back agave, all processes are bound to draw blood.
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    The worst thing about locking strings on at the tuner is getting the darned things off again. I prefer to simply wind them off rather than have to resort to wire cutters. If you insist on locking them on, you’ll likely change your mind the first time you break a string in the middle of a set.

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    Registered User mandolin breeze's Avatar
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Ok, can't wait to try the multiple wind method next time. Always looking for something easier and better - yes, getting the lock part off can be a challenge and bloody

    Do you go back through the hole from the inside or outside? I'm guessing 2 or 3 winds on the wound ones, maybe one or two more for the A & E?

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by mandolin breeze View Post
    Ok, can't wait to try the multiple wind method next time. Always looking for something easier and better - yes, getting the lock part off can be a challenge and bloody

    Do you go back through the hole from the inside or outside? I'm guessing 2 or 3 winds on the wound ones, maybe one or two more for the A & E?
    Yes, I do about 3 (sometimes 4, for thin strings) winds around the post under hand tension, then thread the loose end through the hole, and start cranking to bring things up to tension. You can get away with just 2 winds for the G string, but I always do 3. No luthier's knots to complicate string removal later (and NO bloody fingers, and added bonus!!). No amount of slack to take up with endless winding before sounding a pitch! The string is typically threaded from the "outside," (to use your term) in the sense that the string end enter enters the post hole from a starting position that's away from the peghead. But threading from the "inside" would work perfectly well, too, except it gets a bit cramped in that space, so this doesn't matter. Try it; you'll like it!

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by sblock View Post
    Yes, I do about 3 (sometimes 4, for thin strings) winds around the post under hand tension, then thread the loose end through the hole, and start cranking to bring things up to tension. You can get away with just 2 winds for the G string, but I always do 3. No luthier's knots to complicate string removal later (and NO bloody fingers, and added bonus!!). No amount of slack to take up with endless winding before sounding a pitch! The string is typically threaded from the "outside," (to use your term) in the sense that the string end enter enters the post hole from a starting position that's away from the peghead. But threading from the "inside" would work perfectly well, too, except it gets a bit cramped in that space, so this doesn't matter. Try it; you'll like it!
    Been doing this for decades, it's the fastest, easiest way I know. Comes off easy too.
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Doesn’t matter to me whether I go from the outside, inside, top or bottom; whichever way the hole happens to be pointing. Just keep the tension on whilst you’re winding round the post - use a capo if necessary but a James tailpiece is even better!

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    I've always done the wrap-poke-tension-trim method. I change one pair of strings at a time and clean the fretboard, nut, headstock, bridge and body under each pair of strings while they're off.

    I tune each new pair up to about 2 steps flat, then gradually and equally tune each string up to pitch about a half step at a time.

    Its important to NOT trim off the excess on round core wound strings until after you have some string tension, otherwise the windings can start to unravel.

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    I hope that everyone is having a great holiday! I am going to try the "wrap 1st, then poke" method on my Gibson A-1. Quick question for clarification: after wrapping, do I simply poke the end of the string and tune it up to pitch, or do I run the tag end of the string underneath main part of the string to hold it under tension against the post? Does this question make sense? Are any of you folks who currently use this method up for making a short video?
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Jim, wrap then put the end thru the hole and pull the end tight as you can. The only thing to remember is that when you go thru the hole it has to be on the top of the winds to keep them on the post. Pull it tight and tune. I think when you do it you will see how easy it is.
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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Something that I do and that others may find helpful is that I once I have looped the string to the tailpiece hook I use a capo to hold it in place on the neck so the sting will not fall off the tail piece hook as I work it through the post and tighten.

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by Billydog View Post
    Something that I do and that others may find helpful is that I once I have looped the string to the tailpiece hook I use a capo to hold it in place on the neck so the sting will not fall off the tail piece hook as I work it through the post and tighten.
    If you wrap the string around the post keeping tension on the string as you wrap, then go thru the hole in the post, the string will stay on the hook without an auxiliary aid.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    I'm used to the lock method as in the video above, but does anyone have a video of the method that the OP is describing?
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  21. #18

    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by ivancook View Post
    I'm used to the lock method as in the video above, but does anyone have a video of the method that the OP is describing?
    That's a video that I'd like to see too.

    I've done both ways described in this thread many times. The locking method never slips...period. But taking the strings off is a pain (literally).

    The wrap-around-first method is fast and easy, but I've seen strings slip using this method. As far as I can tell, there is no string company, no mandolin builder, no guitar builder or any serious luthier/technician that recommends the wrap around first method.

    Not saying it's wrong or that it doesn't work for those who like it. I still do it myself that way often. But I would like to see a credible video showing a demonstration of that method.
    "I play BG so that's what I can talk intelligently about." A line I loved and pirated from Mandoplumb

  22. #19

    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by pops1 View Post
    If you wrap the string around the post keeping tension on the string as you wrap, then go thru the hole in the post, the string will stay on the hook without an auxiliary aid.
    I just think it's an easier option with the capo.

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Capo works for me too.

    My eyesight isn't the best and I struggle with the E string especially.

    Holding the tension on the wraps while trying to poke the string through the hole is a bit challenging for me.

    Last night I had the wraps flip over the post at the critical moment, again ��
    Bren

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by FLATROCK HILL View Post
    The wrap-around-first method is fast and easy, but I've seen strings slip using this method. As far as I can tell, there is no string company, no mandolin builder, no guitar builder or any serious luthier/technician that recommends the wrap around first method.
    .
    The wrap around first has the same end result as sticking string thru with some excess and using a string winder to wind 3 or 4 windings on the peg. It's just a matter of preference how you want to do it.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Quote Originally Posted by pops1 View Post
    The wrap around first has the same end result as sticking string thru with some excess and using a string winder to wind 3 or 4 windings on the peg. It's just a matter of preference how you want to do it.
    I have tried a few methods, but I went back to what you describe. I bend the string about 2 inches beyond the tuner post, shove the string in the hole, and use the stringer winder to get it tight. I cannot ever recall having a string slip on mandolin or guitar using this method.

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    Default Re: ? Changing strings

    Never “locked” a string on, never had problems with slipping strings - only been changing them for 50 years so I might have been lucky! Using the wind/poke/tune method, if they slip a little whilst you’re tuning them up, it really doesn’t matter.

    I change them a course at a time and, after tuning each string up to pitch, I give them a good yank and then re-tune them. This takes some of the stretch out of the strings.

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