Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 37 of 37

Thread: Mandocello "strum along" chords

  1. #26
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Bend OR
    Posts
    154

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord of the Badgers View Post
    IIRC the nordic mandolas use a single nylon C course for their theorbed strings - someone correct me maybe?
    Uh oh Bernie - watch out for the white rabbit & the hole.... ! that's the trouble with CBOM, right?
    I have heard that as well, but been unable to verify it.

  2. #27
    mando-evangelist August Watters's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Oregon
    Posts
    1,002
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Daniel View Post
    Yes thanks for the comments! My interest seems from the conundrum that I describe in post #13 -- the fact that some chord formations work on a mandolin but not a mandocello. I realize others have seen and described this phenomenon before but I'd like to minimize its presence as much as possible.
    Sounds like you're talking about "lower interval limits." It's an arranging term that refers to how low you can play two notes, before the distance (interval) between them starts sounding too muddy to be perceived as a harmonic interval. That's subjective of course, but you can think of LILs as a general guideline about how the ear perceives low intervals. LILs are really helpful when applied to understanding how mandocello chords work.

    Here's a decent explanation of the topic. Notice around 2:20, there's a general guideline that the D (open string on cello) is approximately the lowest note which should generally be used as the higher of two notes -- if you want the two notes together to sound clear, and not muddy. Putting that idea on the cello, it makes sense that the open D string sounds good with any note below it on the G string. But below that, most intervals can get muddy-sounding.

    Thanks a lot August! I have a lot of busy work to do this morning then I'm going to play around with your chart. I noticed on your F-chord that you have decided to deaden or not play the open C-course. The C is the V note but I imagine you are doing that because to your ear it sounds better with just AFC rather than CAFC?
    Exactly -- In that chord the low C, sounding as part of an F chord, forms an interval of a major 6th with the next-higher note, which is A -- quite a bit lower than the LIL for a major 6th. Of course there are times that can work, and you have to decide for yourself when it sounds good or when it's not working. But for me, I generally don't use the low C at all, unless it's by itself, or perhaps sounding with notes on the other courses, fret 7 or higher.
    Last edited by August Watters; Oct-22-2020 at 7:34pm.
    Exploring Classical Mandolin (Berklee Press, 2015)
    Progressive Melodies for Mandocello (Amazon, 2019)
    New Solos for Classical Mandolin (Hal Leonard Press, 2020)

  3. #28
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    I have a lot of material and topics ready for my CMSA Mandocello Hangout session, but one theme will be mandolin "things" that do not transfer to the mandocello. This chording thing is clearly one such issue: Not just the larger, longer, wider neck and body, but the complications of lower sounds. Thanks to all the people posting here and other threads for suggestions and questions--and for helping feed the growing interest in this instrument.
    If you are not a CMSA member, I urge you to join and register for the event: Mandocello and liuto cantabile master Fabio Giudice will be answering some of these questions, and a bunch of us will be performing all-mandocello music. And--like August--Fabio and I are trying to promote the mandocello on its own terms--as a solo instrument.

  4. The following members say thank you to Jim Imhoff for this post:


  5. #29
    Certified! Bernie Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    8,283
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Imhoff View Post
    I have a lot of material and topics ready for my CMSA Mandocello Hangout session, but one theme will be mandolin "things" that do not transfer to the mandocello. This chording thing is clearly one such issue: Not just the larger, longer, wider neck and body, but the complications of lower sounds. Thanks to all the people posting here and other threads for suggestions and questions--and for helping feed the growing interest in this instrument.
    If you are not a CMSA member, I urge you to join and register for the event: Mandocello and liuto cantabile master Fabio Giudice will be answering some of these questions, and a bunch of us will be performing all-mandocello music. And--like August--Fabio and I are trying to promote the mandocello on its own terms--as a solo instrument.
    Thanks Jim! I hope some of that good stuff will be captured in a video format --- what a great YouTube series it would be.

    My original interest was to use to accompany vocal efforts. The big problem with that (aside from my baritone/bass voice range) is that with ease you can make a mandocello can sound like a approaching train and it can be a challenge projecting your voice over that "wall of sound".

    Good luck on you conference!
    Bernie
    ____
    Due to current budgetary restrictions the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off -- sorry about the inconvenience.

  6. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Also a baritone, although I was a vocal major and can extend my range a bit. I suggest realistically not trying to use the MC on every song--I mostly use mandolin (with a guitar-fiddle-bass group) and some guitar. But it does work (for me) on songs where you sing a line and have a little musical figure or echo before the next phrase is sung.
    A suggestion that fits the instrument and vocal back-up is, depending on the song, light strum or arpeggio on the sung lines, and a bass run on the little break between lines. In general, you are wise to avoid the wall of sound when actually singing--maybe as a filler between verses or dramatic end. Also, a song that has a distinctive figure in the bass: It is the absolutely perfect instrument for Roy Orbison's Pretty Woman.
    The CMSA stuff will be videoed, but will be available only to convention-registered members. A lot of work and expense goes into organizing and hosting these events, and bringing in world class professional players. The topic of travel with the big mandocello has come up, so this year's online event is a great time to join from home.

  7. #31
    Lord of All Badgers Lord of the Badgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    South West UK
    Posts
    1,243

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Rules are made to be broken
    There's a lad on the UK folk scene called Thom Ashworth - he mostly sings trad songs with just his bass guitar for accompaniment... so 'cello doesn't seem too much of a stretch to use heavily for the right voice.
    Couldn't tell you what register he sings in - if you find it let me know!
    My name is Rob, and I am Lord of All Badgers

    Tenor Guitars: Acoustic: Mcilroy ASP10T, 59 Martin 0-18t. Electric: 57 Gibson ETG-150, 80s Manson Kestrel
    Mandolins: Davidson f5, A5 "Badgerlin".
    Bouzouki: Paul Shippey Axe
    My band's website

  8. The following members say thank you to Lord of the Badgers for this post:


  9. #32
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Bend OR
    Posts
    154

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord of the Badgers View Post
    Rules are made to be broken
    There's a lad on the UK folk scene called Thom Ashworth - he mostly sings trad songs with just his bass guitar for accompaniment... so 'cello doesn't seem too much of a stretch to use heavily for the right voice.
    Couldn't tell you what register he sings in - if you find it let me know!
    Thom Ashworh has a couple of videos up... here is one:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CGOqOVxPMSU

  10. The following members say thank you to meow-n-dolin for this post:


  11. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Indepndence OR
    Posts
    379

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Yeah--that would work! But you do need a strong voice--like his. Great song & sound.

  12. #34
    Lord of All Badgers Lord of the Badgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    South West UK
    Posts
    1,243

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    good song, good playing, good voice, good looking

    not that I'm jealous
    My name is Rob, and I am Lord of All Badgers

    Tenor Guitars: Acoustic: Mcilroy ASP10T, 59 Martin 0-18t. Electric: 57 Gibson ETG-150, 80s Manson Kestrel
    Mandolins: Davidson f5, A5 "Badgerlin".
    Bouzouki: Paul Shippey Axe
    My band's website

  13. The following members say thank you to Lord of the Badgers for this post:


  14. #35
    Certified! Bernie Daniel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Cincinnati, Ohio, USA
    Posts
    8,283
    Blog Entries
    4

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Quote Originally Posted by Lord of the Badgers View Post
    good song, good playing, good voice, good looking

    not that I'm jealous
    Yeah great video IMO. He is singing in the key of C I think? That's kind of my best pitch -- so I am assuming he has a low-end baritone/high-end bass kind of range? He seems to be into social protest...

    Bernie
    ____
    Due to current budgetary restrictions the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off -- sorry about the inconvenience.

  15. #36
    Lord of All Badgers Lord of the Badgers's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    South West UK
    Posts
    1,243

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    Well someone's gotta. We're too 'party' as a band. He was on before us at a folk festival last year. Really enjoyed his set.
    My name is Rob, and I am Lord of All Badgers

    Tenor Guitars: Acoustic: Mcilroy ASP10T, 59 Martin 0-18t. Electric: 57 Gibson ETG-150, 80s Manson Kestrel
    Mandolins: Davidson f5, A5 "Badgerlin".
    Bouzouki: Paul Shippey Axe
    My band's website

  16. #37

    Default Re: Mandocello "strum along" chords

    i have been working on william g. leavitt's method since the second lockdown (nov. 2020) for mandocello. I learned a lot from it.

    maybe it helps:

    https://youtu.be/gy5cknBZd1o

    Greetings from Germany

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •