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Thread: "The fiddle is laughing" (no mando)

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    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
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    Default "The fiddle is laughing" (no mando)

    A good CBC Radio show with the popular Acadian multi-instumentalist, Gilles Losier, and young Montreal fiddler, Maxim Bergeron, with much focus on the music of Jean Carignan. I'd be surprised if Gilles doesn't play mandolin among his many instruments, including fiddle, organ, electric and acoustic bass, and bagpipes, but he only plays piano accompaniment on this program. A good show.

    https://www.cbc.ca/radio/thesundayed...live-1.5282342
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

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    Registered User DougC's Avatar
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    Default Re: "The fiddle is laughing" (no mando)

    Great music from one of the best. However I'd like to see the kid play fiddle. (I'll bet he's pretty darn good.)
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

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    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
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    Default Re: "The fiddle is laughing" (no mando)

    Quote Originally Posted by DougC View Post
    Great music from one of the best. However I'd like to see the kid play fiddle. (I'll bet he's pretty darn good.)
    Thanks, Doug. Maxime was playing during the program, although it had Ti-Jean recordings too. ("Ti" is "little' [petit] for anyone without French.)
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

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