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Thread: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

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    Default Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    I've been reading about the new Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks models. They are advertised as a "deeper body and a deeper sound". I'm intrigued - I tested a new Weber Gallatin last week and the clear tone is very nice, but I would prefer a deeper tone on the lower strings.

    Does anyone know the actual body depth on these? I would think that Weber would prominently list the measurement of the deeper body, but I can't find it.

    Thanks,
    Matt

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    Registered User Joey Anchors's Avatar
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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    This has my interest! Would love to test drive one of these deeper body Weber’s.
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    Registered User Al Trujillo's Avatar
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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    When they first introduced them the first thing I thought of was Weber's version of the Northfield 'Big Mon'?

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Trujillo View Post
    When they first introduced them the first thing I thought of was Weber's version of the Northfield 'Big Mon'?
    My thought as well.
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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    The Big Mon’s slightly oversized body delivers what they claim. Would be interested to check our the Weber.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    They mention this: "The deeper body profile, with a mahogany headblock, creates a warmer bass, blending a versatile bit of oval hole timbre in with the f-hole’s classic chop." Mahogany once again mellows out the sound. The larger cavity enhances the sound but varnish and really good woods would probably do that as well. The 2A Sitka spruce top will mellow the sound too. It won't pop like Red Spruce at first at least.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    The body depth is 1 7/16” on the Road Dog and Red Rocks models.
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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Fish View Post
    The body depth is 1 7/16” on the Road Dog and Red Rocks models.
    Thanks, Ryan. I see you're located in Bend, OR. Do you work at Weber?

    I emailed Weber yesterday when it seemed like no one had a measurement on the body depth of these new mandos. Their response was the same as yours - 1 7/16".

    I'm guessing that's the depth at the top of the body, near the neck joint, since 1 7/16" is pretty shallow for the tail-piece end. I emailed them back to see if they can provide the depth by the tail piece. I'll post and update if they give me that measurement.

    Matt

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Matt,
    Yes I work for Weber. 1 7/16” is the depth of the sides, the body structure before the top and back are glued on.
    Weber Mandolin Builder

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Ryan is too modest, so I'll jump in. He's Weber's lead luthier, and a heck of a talented and nice guy, profiled in this feature.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Ryan Fish View Post
    Matt,
    Yes I work for Weber. 1 7/16” is the depth of the sides, the body structure before the top and back are glued on.
    That makes sense now. Thanks for clarifying. And thanks for jumping into this conversation. I'm looking forward to trying out one of these deeper body Mandos once the shop here in town gets one.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Al Trujillo View Post
    When they first introduced them the first thing I thought of was Weber's version of the Northfield 'Big Mon'?
    I am pretty sure the old Weber Bighorns built by Bruce had a larger body cavity, which predates the Northfield bigmon...

    I don’t think the bigmon is just deeper, rather slightly larger all around?

    Not sure how added depth to increased overall body size compare
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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Quote Originally Posted by dang View Post
    I am pretty sure the old Weber Bighorns built by Bruce had a larger body cavity, which predates the Northfield bigmon...

    I don’t think the bigmon is just deeper, rather slightly larger all around?

    Not sure how added depth to increased overall body size compare
    It would be fun to compare a Bighorn to one of the new deeper body models.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    I played a Weber Road Dog on Friday at Acoustic Music in Salt Lake City. It is great! Very nice low-end tone. I compared it to a couple Gallatins at the store, and the Road Dog sounds much throatier in the bass. I like the Gallatins too, but the extra bass is pretty great.

    I still hope to get a chance to try a Red Rocks. Hopefully by the time I can save up enough $, Acoustic Music will get one of them in.

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    I am glad to hear that one can go into Acoustic Music. It is a great, great store!

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    Default Re: Body depth - Weber Road Dog & Red Rocks

    Violas have less standard body sizes and shapes. My experience with them is that tall ribs alone make for the deep tone, but short sides and more top area project better.

    An interesting challenge would be a broader-topped instrument. There is no compelling reason for a mandolin to be narrow. A violin has to accommodate bow access, but nothing prevents a wide mandolin except expectations of a look. A wider body is more stable, easier to hold. (I had Almuse build my electric with a larger body, and it handles well.)

    Resonances for projecting well at mandolin pitch would be preserved by reducing rib height to compensate. Or, keep the rib height and make a 10-string with broader top but mandolin scale for facility.
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