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Thread: Making a Measuring Wheel

  1. #1

    Default Making a Measuring Wheel

    Today I made a measuring wheel. It's a very old tool used to measure curved surfaces that a regular rule can't. It's a quick project and can be made simply or 'dressed up'.


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  3. #2
    Orrig Onion HonketyHank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    Hey thanks! A couple years ago I whittled this doodad from a piece of hard maple. It has served as a kind of soothing adult pacifier for me ever since. But I have often wondered what it really is. Now I know!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    New to mando? Click this link -->Newbies to join us at the Newbies Social Group.

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  4. #3
    Registered User Drew Egerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    looks like a great pizza cutter
    Drew
    2016 Skip Kelley Vintage F-5 (#54)
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  5. #4

    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    Quote Originally Posted by HonketyHank View Post
    Hey thanks! A couple years ago I whittled this doodad from a piece of hard maple. It has served as a kind of soothing adult pacifier for me ever since. But I have often wondered what it really is. Now I know!
    Click image for larger version. 

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    That's really putting the cart before the horse! Looks really nice.

  6. #5
    Registered User
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    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    Or you could simply buy one of these - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Keenso-Outd...ag=googhydr-21

  7. #6
    I may be old but I'm ugly billhay4's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    That's no fun.
    Bill
    IM(NS)HO

  8. #7
    Certified! Bernie Daniel's Avatar
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    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    I have one of these that I bought many years ago (earlier model) for work to compute stream distances from USGS topographical maps. It would work great for luthiery but I've only used it one time. They are obsolete in map work -- these days you just go to your computer and click on the link to your geographic information system.
    Bernie
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    Due to current budgetary restrictions the light at the end of the tunnel has been turned off -- sorry about the inconvenience.

  9. #8

    Default Re: Making a Measuring Wheel

    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is the blacksmith version from antiquity. It is called a traveller. This one has one notch, and partial revolutions are marked with chalk. It is the practical alternative to string when measuring a carriage or wagon wheel for an iron tire. Practical since it works on hot iron without burning up! The tire is welded up from strap metal, a trifle small, then heated in a large fire to expand, and dropped onto the wood rim. When it shrinks down, the wheel, its felloes and spokes are permanently compressed into a tough, tight assembly. I’m not sure, but I believe smaller versions were used by other trades.

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