Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 57

Thread: Is this how it starts?

  1. #26
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    I feel so lucky!

  2. #27
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    1,084

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Congrats on having such a great Strad-O-Lin. They have a great sound. Yours is fantastic. I agree with Jake as to the time period. The valve cover tuners seem to have been popular in '40 and '41. Regal used them on their top of the line guitar.

    May you enjoy playing it for many years. (And it's great Jake put your instrument on his blog. He's got a lot of good instruments there.)
    2008 Weber Gallatin F, 1935 Gibson A50, 2018 Collings MT, 1989 Flatiron Performer A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 1935 Kalamazoo KM-21, 2018 Eastman MDO-305
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/
    https://www.lauluaika.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/Longtine-Pl...4404553312723/

  3. The following members say thank you to Eric Platt for this post:


  4. #28
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Thank you again for the kind words.

    I agree with Jake as to the time period. The valve cover tuners seem to have been popular in '40 and '41.
    Corroboration is good. Jake said those tuners were only made for one year.

    (And it's great Jake put your instrument on his blog. He's got a lot of good instruments there.)
    A little corny, but it sort of feels like when your kid makes the honor role

  5. The following members say thank you to Sue Rieter for this post:


  6. #29
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,335

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Sue, so glad you're getting such satisfaction out of your Strad-O-Lin. I've owned a couple of them over the last 25-30 years; the first one I bought, badly cracked and with super-alligatored finish, from an 85-year-old NYCity lady who'd kept it under her bed for decades. I paid her either $25 or $50, can't remember, and, once fixed up, it was my go-to instrument to take camping, to sing-arounds, or just to throw in the back of the car "just in case there's some music." I performed with it, recorded with it, and finally traded it in -- on a nicer Strad-O-Lin!

    Strad-O-Lins with their mysterious origin and "knockabout" work-person-ship, have been the Ugly Ducklings of the mandolin world for a long time. People familiar with 20th-century mandolins have long known that they're "hidden gems," sounding much better than they look, survivors from a time when US companies produced excellent entry-and-intermediate-level instruments that were affordable and very playable.

    I have a number of instruments by Lyon & Healy, Regal, Oscar Schmidt et. al. that were built for the general market, not fancy at all, just decently constructed from good materials, with very serviceable designs and excellent sound. I wish that capability still existed in the US, and that we didn't have to rely on imported instruments to fill the lower rungs of the market "ladder." I hope you have found a relic of that era of American instrument production, that will stay with you for a long time.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  7. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to allenhopkins For This Useful Post:


  8. #30
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    141

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    These are such great instruments, congrats! I have a very similar one (https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/t...-Serial-Number). I think its a laminate back and sides with solid top but I don't care, it has such rich low end and nice volume. mine has a couple cracks I tried to have repaired but they came unglued. Probably need to take the top off to really fix them. Decided they're just part of the character of the mandolin and am leaving them. Enjoy yours!!

  9. #31
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    I saw yours, jaybp30. It's probably the closest one of all the pictures I looked at.

  10. #32
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    I have a number of instruments by Lyon & Healy, Regal, Oscar Schmidt et. al. that were built for the general market, not fancy at all, just decently constructed from good materials, with very serviceable designs and excellent sound. I wish that capability still existed in the US, and that we didn't have to rely on imported instruments to fill the lower rungs of the market "ladder." I hope you have found a relic of that era of American instrument production, that will stay with you for a long time.
    Beyond perhaps a smidgin of patriotism or nostalgia or the like, this is a big reason I started thinking about older American instruments in the first place. I think about how much tweaking it took to get my Korean Kentucky playing reasonably, and how well the Strad-O-Lin has held up to the tests of time, and how much better it sounds. Both instruments built for the masses.

    Sue

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Sue Rieter For This Useful Post:


  12. #33

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Congratulations on such a great find, Sue! Really nice looking.

  13. The following members say thank you to SOMorris for this post:


  14. #34
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Another holiday, another mandolin. Suddenly I find myself with the beginnings of a herd

    I hope the Stradolin doesn't get jealous, but I have a new Morris flat top mandolin (maybe you saw it in the Classifieds) coming my way from Oregon in the morning. My thought is I will just have to spend twice as much time playing so that both get the attention they deserve.

    I haven't fully discussed it with my husband yet, but I have in mind what I will say when it comes up. "It's a much more affordable addiction than airplanes." (I did quite a bit of flying a number of years ago)

    Sue

  15. #35
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,335

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sue Rieter View Post
    ..."It's a much more affordable addiction than airplanes." (I did quite a bit of flying a number of years ago)...
    Yeah, I get that: you think you only need one airplane, then you want a "beater" Piper Cub to take camping, then you think you want something different and larger -- maybe a twin-engine -- then you hear a Lloyd Lear Jet at a fly-in somewhere, and you need that, so you trade in the Beechcraft and a couple million buxx –– and where do you store them all? And you see a pre-war Stinson on eBay; needs restoration, but it's a real historic gem, so you bid sorta hoping someone will overbid you, but no one does (you're not to blame, it was late at night and you'd had a couple glasses of wine)...

    Pretty soon you're in marriage counseling and personal bankruptcy. Stick to mandolins; they all fit in one room (well, two rooms if you count the closet).
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to allenhopkins For This Useful Post:


  17. #36
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    True, but sometimes I still think about the Stinson I didn't buy. (I had a Piper Cherokee 180)

    Then there were floatplanes, and IFR equipped travellers.....

    .... Yeah, better to stick to mandolins
    Last edited by Sue Rieter; Sep-07-2020 at 3:31pm. Reason: another idea

  18. The following members say thank you to Sue Rieter for this post:


  19. #37
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Way to go Sue, a new Morris in addition to the old Stradolin! So, I guess it is time to modify the title of this thread from a question 'Is this how it starts?' to a statement 'This is how it starts'

    Enjoy!

    Rob
    2020 Sawchyn Beavertail
    1950's Stradolin

  20. The following members say thank you to robw95 for this post:


  21. #38
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    3,110

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sue Rieter View Post
    Another holiday, another mandolin. Suddenly I find myself with the beginnings of a herd
    Sue, are you familiar with the resonator mandolin?
    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
    2005 National RM-1
    2007 Hester A5
    2009 Passernig A5
    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2011 Passernig F5
    2018 Vessel TM5

  22. The following members say thank you to pheffernan for this post:


  23. #39
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Here it is, Morris #450 just built last month! So lovely, but in a way that is totally different from the Strad-O-Lin. I like that it is mostly made of wood that Mr. Morris got fairly locally: cedar and silver maple from Oregon, black walnut from Washington. Built just a few hours from where my daughter lives, and by a guy with the same first name as my late Dad and my brother. And the matching fingerboard and bridge are very cool.

    Is it possible to be in love with two mandolins at the same time? These are so different, like night and day. The Strad-O-Lin is like a warm summer afternoon, and the Morris is like late on a moonlit night. (A little corny, but hey.)

    I feel lucky to have two such wonderful instruments!

    Sue
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200914_134708.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	739.5 KB 
ID:	188563   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200914_134453.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	459.3 KB 
ID:	188564   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200914_134502.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	682.2 KB 
ID:	188567  

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200914_134422.jpg 
Views:	31 
Size:	1.84 MB 
ID:	188565   Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20200914_134442.jpg 
Views:	25 
Size:	1.59 MB 
ID:	188566  

  24. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Sue Rieter For This Useful Post:


  25. #40
    Registered User Cobalt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    That does look good. Congratulations!

  26. The following members say thank you to Cobalt for this post:


  27. #41
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Southern California
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Congrats! The figuring on the fingerboard and bridge is stunning!

    Rob
    2020 Sawchyn Beavertail
    1950's Stradolin

  28. The following members say thank you to robw95 for this post:


  29. #42
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    3,110

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sue Rieter View Post
    I feel lucky to have two such wonderful instruments!
    Sue, now that you have reached your third mandolin, it is probably the appropriate time to warn you that one's fifth mandolin typically costs as much as the previous four put together.
    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
    2005 National RM-1
    2007 Hester A5
    2009 Passernig A5
    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2011 Passernig F5
    2018 Vessel TM5

  30. The following members say thank you to pheffernan for this post:


  31. #43
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by pheffernan View Post
    Sue, now that you have reached your third mandolin, it is probably the appropriate time to warn you that one's fifth mandolin typically costs as much as the previous four put together.
    I can see from your list that you know what you're talking about!

  32. #44
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    1,084

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Congrats on the Morris. That's a very pretty mandolin. And am betting it sounds good. Like you say, different than a Strad-O-Lin. They should compliment each other quite well.
    2008 Weber Gallatin F, 1935 Gibson A50, 2018 Collings MT, 1989 Flatiron Performer A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 1935 Kalamazoo KM-21, 2018 Eastman MDO-305
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/
    https://www.lauluaika.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/Longtine-Pl...4404553312723/

  33. The following members say thank you to Eric Platt for this post:


  34. #45
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Platt View Post
    Congrats on the Morris. That's a very pretty mandolin. And am betting it sounds good. Like you say, different than a Strad-O-Lin. They should compliment each other quite well.
    It does sound very nice. And very easy to play. The action is amazing.

    I only wish I could play it for you without embarrassing myself. Maybe pretty soon.

  35. #46
    Registered User Buck's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    KY
    Posts
    401

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    "Is this how it starts?"

    Perhaps I missed it, but I didn't see a succinct answer to the original question. The answer is, "Yes!" :-)

    Congrats! The Strad-O-Lin is especially cool.
    Todd Yates

  36. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Buck For This Useful Post:


  37. #47
    FIDDLES with STRADOLINS your_diamond's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Sarasota
    Posts
    375

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Sue, The center stripe of the neck is (more than likely) Brazilian Rosewood, as are the fretboard and bridge. Brazilian Rosewood was just another available wood in the 40's. Asymmetrical fretboard extensions were used on the better Stradolins so I would get a second opinion to see if the back is solid of laminated.

    How do you like the raised fretboard extension?

  38. The following members say thank you to your_diamond for this post:


  39. #48
    Registered User Sue Rieter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Location
    New Hampshire
    Posts
    222

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by your_diamond View Post
    Sue, The center stripe of the neck is (more than likely) Brazilian Rosewood, as are the fretboard and bridge. Brazilian Rosewood was just another available wood in the 40's. Asymmetrical fretboard extensions were used on the better Stradolins so I would get a second opinion to see if the back is solid of laminated.

    How do you like the raised fretboard extension?
    Have you ever seen the stairstep before?

    Here's how much I like the Stradolin - if I had to pare my belongings down to what fits in my car, this mandolin would make the cut.
    I'm not sophisticated enough to know what the raised fretboard extension does for the sound, but I do know it looks wicked cool and the mandolin sounds excellent to my ear. It has a good amount of volume and the sound feels full and complete. I like the vibes, visual and aural.

    I like the Morris, too. It looks and sounds really different, with notes that go on and blend together. Right now I alternate which one I play. When I get better and have a bigger repertoire, I will probably choose a mandolin to play according to what best suits the music.

    Sue

  40. The following members say thank you to Sue Rieter for this post:


  41. #49

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    Quote Originally Posted by Sue Rieter View Post
    When I get better and have a bigger repertoire, I will probably choose a mandolin to play according to what best suits the music.
    Yep, that's how it starts alright.

    A different mandolin for each style of music. And then, for each style, a practice mandolin, a beater gigging mandolin, a fancy-shmancy concert mandolin, maybe another mandolin that records acoustically better than the live ones that have pickups...

  42. The following members say thank you to Jim Bevan for this post:


  43. #50
    Registered User lucho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Valparaiso, Chile
    Posts
    169
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Is this how it starts?

    [QUOTE=Sue Rieter;1778070]So I have a new mando in my life, a craiglist Strad-O-Lin, advertised as 50's but Mike E says it could be older. I think it's solid wood, at least the top, and even though the action is about the same height as my Kentucky, it plays easier and is really loud. I REALLY like the way it looks. The color is great, the matching pickguard and tailpiece cover are really cool, and it has a cool line down the middle of the back of the neck that I like. The guy selling it was the son of the owner, it was from his estate. Armed with just enough knowledge to be dangerous (thanks, Cafe!), I negotiated him down a fair amount. I paid $275.

    Hi Sue: I started like you from a charango to an older A Kentucky ... then a Flatiron..... and now...many years later with MAS .. I have 6 mandos plus many more instruments..... Also, I had one exactly like yours (see photo link) ...great mando until it was stolen... Anyway, the neck of these Stradolins is chunkier than any of the more recent mandos.... so I suppose it should survive some abuse resting in storage for long time.... More trouble is if that place was affected by humidity and temperature changes.... then you might be in trouble.... Anyway, great acquisition... https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/a...chmentid=51109
    Last edited by lucho; Oct-13-2020 at 11:03am.

  44. The following members say thank you to lucho for this post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •