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Thread: Red Henry Maple Bridge

  1. #1
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    Default Red Henry Maple Bridge

    Hi, I have an Eastman MD 805 and I have found it (to me) not as loud as I would like so I have tried various things to try to satisfy me. One of which is several years ago I purchased a Red Henry Maple (solid) Bridge which I never installed as it must be fitted ect. so I just forgot about it I guess then it suddenly appeared so I'm wondering if it is worth the effort in terms of sound improvement?

    I did a search for this bridge on this forum with no results so maybe it does not exist as I bought it at least 12 years ago.

    I'm curious, tks, Duane.

  2. #2
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    Here's every thread with Red Henry in it. His bridges were discussed quite often years back, not much these days.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  3. #3
    Registered User Jon Hall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    Other Luther's are making bridges inspired Red Henry's.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    You can go down a very long rabbit hole on this one.... and you will fatigue your ears even more quickly than you will fatigue your fingers (by restringing) with the unlimited number of possible variations. I spent a lot of time with this years ago. Is fun but very tedious.

  5. #5
    Registered User CWRoyds's Avatar
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    There is only so much you will change a mandolin with trading out parts.
    In the end, that particular mandolin might not be loud enough for you.

    I did find a slight volume increase when I changed an original bridge on a J Bovier F5 to a Cumberland bridge.
    They make an excellent ebony bridge.

    You might want to consider trading up to a different mandolin.
    Mandolins: Northfield 5-Bar Artist Model "Old Dog", J Bovier F5 Special, Gibson A-00 (1940)
    Fiddles: 1920s Strad copy, 1930s Strad copy, Liu Xi T20, Liu Xi T19+ Dark.
    Guitars: Taylor 514c (1995), Gibson Southern Jumbo (1940s), Gibson L-48 (1940s), Les Paul Custom (1978), Fender Strat (Black/RWFB) (1984), Fender Strat (Candy Apple Red/MFB) (1985).
    Sitars: Hiren Roy KP (1980s), Naskar (1970s), Naskar (1960s).
    Misc: 8 Course Lute (L.K.Brown)

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    So, I think what I'm reading is that the gain is probably not worth the effort? Really, the mandolin sounds real good but you know one is always "fiddlin" trying to get that satisfying sound I guess. Thanks to you all....

  7. #7

    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    My days of putting money into low end instruments for very little to no gains are over. I try to focus on my playing as much as possible to get all I can out of the instrument. Also, a really good setup goes a long way. Not just lowering your action.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Red Henry Maple Bridge

    Before all this craziness I was at a jam and tried out a Pava. It was real nice and when the I played my Brentrup the owner of the Pava said wow it is loud. When I played her Pava it was also quite loud. Her playing style was not the same as mine and therefore not as loud. Tho I don't seem to work hard, or look to play hard, I have a firm attack. Decades of playing into mic's I guess. Gives me more volume than someone with a less firm attack. Work on you technique instead of your bridge. A new bridge may, or may not, help your mandolin. Technique will always help.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

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