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Thread: A Year With Calace?

  1. #26

    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Tim,
    Thank you for the two questions and your support!

    To your first question:
    Both. Of course, it never hurts to go back and repeat lessons you've already learned. In addition, the notes show you what development you have made and how your "taste" develops. Therefore, the progress in the various exercises should be recorded as accurately as possible.
    In order to further consolidate what you have learned in a lesson, techniques and approaches are repeated in later lessons and supplemented by various aspects. So the next lesson (lesson 5) will pick up on what you've learned from lesson 1.
    In the end, of course, it is up to you to what extent you need to return to old lessons. My goal with "A Year with Raffaele Calace" is to teach practice techniques and to show what thoughts you can make into a composition.
    After the first year, I'm thinking of taking two of the preludes apart the next year. The principle would be the same as this year, except that a composition will be treated over several months. But that's just a thought so far. The extent to which I will implement this will then be decided in early 2021.

    To your second question:
    A fairly detailed table of contents is planned, which includes the first few bars of the study treated and a brief description of the lesson. But this will be written at the end of the year, i.e. next April to May.

    About PS 1: "Tkt." is the German abbreviation for bar.
    About PS 3: Your vote is noted. The next project with variations from the 18th century will probably start on November 1st, 2020. The working title is currently "A Year with the Classics". What do you think?

    That was a really long answer. I hope that I was able to answer all questions well.

    Best wishes from Hamburg,
    Florian

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  3. #27
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
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    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Thank you Florian! Your answer was very helpful and to the point. Your approach is brilliant!!! It is extremely helpful and the process is quite satisfying. I hope more and more people discover what you are doing as I know they will benefit greatly. A Year With The Classics sounds great - but to be honest, anything you do is sure to be brilliant based on what I have seen so far. Wonderful!

    “There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Phoenix Neoclassical Europa III #623
    2018 Carlo Mazzaccara Lucia
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin - in progress!

  4. #28
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
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    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    I need to be educated. The exercise practice tips indicate what I call a "metered tremolo" in which a precise count of tremolo beats is required - versus "free tremolo" in which beats are not counted per se even though the overall etude is played in correct time. I am wondering why that is and whether or not there exists a difference of opinion among high level classical musicians. Thank you.

    “There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Phoenix Neoclassical Europa III #623
    2018 Carlo Mazzaccara Lucia
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin - in progress!

  5. #29
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
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    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Florian, how does it come to be that étude No. 136, for example, is played all with tremolo? Calace's Method for Mandolin does not indicate tremolo on that etude. Was tremolo the norm for his time and it was just expected? Or was it played that way on recordings? Or was it possibly handed down through his students? I am just curious as to how these traditions come about? Thank you for all your help.
    Last edited by Tim Logan; Aug-15-2020 at 5:34pm.

    “There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Phoenix Neoclassical Europa III #623
    2018 Carlo Mazzaccara Lucia
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin - in progress!

  6. #30

    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    The metric and free tremolo exist side by side. How they are used depends on several factors:
    - time of composition
    - composer
    - Origin of the composer
    - taste of the performer
    - skills of the interpreter
    - Reason for the composition
    and much more. Clear, catchy rules are difficult to formulate. In the end, the interpreter has to decide for himself.

    In the first lesson, I chose the metric tremolo because I had to commit to one aspect. Otherwise the number of pages for the lesson would have exploded. The free tremolo will gradually flow in as the course progresses.
    On top of that, it's just a good starting point to get your wrist used to the speed. Since I intend to teach techniques for practicing with the book, I wanted to incorporate that.
    You can also see notes in Part 6 of Calace's Method, where he relates to the metric tremolo. (e.g. Etude No 282 etc.)

    You´re welcome! :-)

  7. #31

    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Logan View Post
    Florian, how does it come to be that étude No. 136, for example, is played all with tremolo? Calace's Method for Mandolin does not indicate tremolo on that etude. Was tremolo the norm for his time and it was just expected? Or was it played that way on recordings? Or was it possibly handed down through his students? I am just curious as to how these traditions come about? Thank you for all your help.
    I haven't found a short, handy rule on tremolo in the mandolin method. I have to read a little more about that. Thanks for the question!

    So far I have only found the following paragraph in the first part of the method for mandolin, which I have tried to translate from Italian into English (thanks to Goog translator). The result was:

    Tremolating is the most essential part of the mandolin; it contains that charm that emanates from the sound of this instrument, that delicate beat that conquers the listener; In short, knowing how to use tremolo means interpreting the music and effectively reproducing the sensations rather than strumming randomly. It is therefore necessary to give something to the instrument being played so that it really has a great effect; In the life of the mandolin and the tremolo, therefore, great injustice is done if it is neglected while it is instead the first duty of the teacher to instruct the student and induce him to overcome this obstacle. The only one, maybe a little serious, in the whole mandolin method.
    The tremolo consists of very rapid up and down movements of the plectrum in order, thanks to this speed, to obtain the amalgamation of a long note associated with the relative color.

    My understanding here is that the tremolo was the norm. He also writes that the tremolo is used on slow and long notes. That fits quite well with Etude 136. In his method for mandolin, Calace mainly refers to the teacher's knowledge. You were expected to know what to do.
    But I will continue to pursue the topic and also look up what he is writing in the method for Liuto.

    Thank you for the question! It's fun to dig deeper into Calace's theory.

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  9. #32
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
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    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Quote Originally Posted by fkrumpf View Post
    The metric and free tremolo exist side by side. How they are used depends on several factors:
    - time of composition
    - composer
    - Origin of the composer
    - taste of the performer
    - skills of the interpreter
    - Reason for the composition
    and much more. Clear, catchy rules are difficult to formulate. In the end, the interpreter has to decide for himself.

    In the first lesson, I chose the metric tremolo because I had to commit to one aspect. Otherwise the number of pages for the lesson would have exploded. The free tremolo will gradually flow in as the course progresses.
    On top of that, it's just a good starting point to get your wrist used to the speed. Since I intend to teach techniques for practicing with the book, I wanted to incorporate that.
    You can also see notes in Part 6 of Calace's Method, where he relates to the metric tremolo. (e.g. Etude No 282 etc.)

    You´re welcome! :-)
    This is an amazingly helpful and informative reply - worth WAY many more cups of coffee. Thank you so much Florian. I am very, very grateful.

    “There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Phoenix Neoclassical Europa III #623
    2018 Carlo Mazzaccara Lucia
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin - in progress!

  10. #33
    Timothy Tim Logan's Avatar
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    Default Re: A Year With Calace?

    Quote Originally Posted by fkrumpf View Post
    I haven't found a short, handy rule on tremolo in the mandolin method. I have to read a little more about that. Thanks for the question!

    So far I have only found the following paragraph in the first part of the method for mandolin, which I have tried to translate from Italian into English (thanks to Goog translator). The result was:

    Tremolating is the most essential part of the mandolin; it contains that charm that emanates from the sound of this instrument, that delicate beat that conquers the listener; In short, knowing how to use tremolo means interpreting the music and effectively reproducing the sensations rather than strumming randomly. It is therefore necessary to give something to the instrument being played so that it really has a great effect; In the life of the mandolin and the tremolo, therefore, great injustice is done if it is neglected while it is instead the first duty of the teacher to instruct the student and induce him to overcome this obstacle. The only one, maybe a little serious, in the whole mandolin method.
    The tremolo consists of very rapid up and down movements of the plectrum in order, thanks to this speed, to obtain the amalgamation of a long note associated with the relative color.

    My understanding here is that the tremolo was the norm. He also writes that the tremolo is used on slow and long notes. That fits quite well with Etude 136. In his method for mandolin, Calace mainly refers to the teacher's knowledge. You were expected to know what to do.
    But I will continue to pursue the topic and also look up what he is writing in the method for Liuto.

    Thank you for the question! It's fun to dig deeper into Calace's theory.
    I truly cannot express how grateful I am to have you respond to these questions. Access to this type of input is nye impossible for mere mortals! This is such a rare opportunity and, as I have said, your approach and concept is so well thought out and presented. (There should be away to contribute more than just one cup of coffee a month for your efforts!!)

    “There are two means of refuge from the miseries of life: music and cats.” ― Albert Schweitzer

    1925 Lyon & Healy Model A, #1674
    2015 Phoenix Neoclassical Europa III #623
    2018 Carlo Mazzaccara Lucia
    2020 Burgin Shanghai Octave Mandolin - in progress!

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