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Thread: Tremolo technique

  1. #1

    Default Tremolo technique

    Greetings from Australia!
    I thought it a good time to make some instructional videos about tremolo. Here is the first one.
    https://youtu.be/TrSLeM3cYd0
    Stay safe, stay home and play mandolin Ruth Roshan

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks for the video, very nice! Please continue. The pick appears to be a Pickboy. Who is the maker of your instrument? It has a very full and bright tone. Thanks again and cheers from Canberra.

  4. #3

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Hi Victor,

    Thank you for your kind words about this video. The maker of my instrument is a Melbourne maker called Jon Dale.

    Best wishes,
    Ruth

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks for the video - I found it very helpful. Looking forward to the next ones.

  7. #5

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by Callum Murray View Post
    Thanks for the video - I found it very helpful. Looking forward to the next ones.
    Thank you for your encouragement. Much appreciated. Ruth

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    Registered User gordonjackson83's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    I'll be honest, I've never really liked tremolo, and as a consequence, I've never learned to do it well!

    However, to be a good all-round musician I suppose I should be able to do it, and when would be a better time to learn and practise?

    I thought the first lesson was very good, clear and nicely paced, and I'm looking forward to the rest, so thank you Ruth.

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  10. #7
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonjackson83 View Post
    I'll be honest, I've never really liked tremolo, and as a consequence, I've never learned to do it well!
    Wow, from the Italian tradition I come from, mandolin w/o tremolo doesn't exist! It's the essential sound of the instrument.

    Thanks for being honest, though.

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  12. #8
    Registered User gordonjackson83's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Heh heh, so it's up there with admitting to beating my wife or wearing corduroy?

    Seriously, playing trad Irish, Scottish and English tunes there's not a lot of need for tremolo.

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  14. #9
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonjackson83 View Post
    Heh heh, so it's up there with admitting to beating my wife or wearing corduroy?

    Seriously, playing trad Irish, Scottish and English tunes there's not a lot of need for tremolo.
    Yeah, I get that, it's not part of the style for most British isles/Celtic/etc. music.

    I do use some tremolo when playing the more "classical" sounding English Country Dance tunes, though.

  15. #10
    Registered User tree's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    David Grisman has a fine tremolo, IMO, in any style he chooses to play. His right hand overall is pretty doggone (haha) incredible . . . love his dynamics!
    Clark Beavans

  16. #11
    Registered User Roger Adams's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Whenever I hear tremolo, I smell pizza....... That's not a bad thing!
    If you can read this, thank a teacher. If you can read this in English, thank a vet.

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  18. #12

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by tree View Post
    David Grisman has a fine tremolo, IMO, in any style he chooses to play. His right hand overall is pretty doggone (haha) incredible . . . love his dynamics!
    Ain't never been no one better ---- 'Cept Old Bill

  19. #13

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks for your encouragement. Lesson 2 is up. It’s about playing legato and separate notes - counting the strokes. Then we play Danny Boy together. It’s a building block for lesson 3 about different ways to create dynamics. Stay safe, stay home, play mandolin. https://youtu.be/Z_VHlBve-to

  20. #14

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks for the videos, Ruth.

  21. #15

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    I really like your teaching style. I'm looking forward to the next two installments. Thank you!

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    Registered User Bad Habbits's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Ruth, Thank you for your time to make the videos. Every bit of knowledge one can absorb helps - anxiously awaiting III and IV.

  23. #17
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks, Ruth. I have always loved your playing. What is that piece you are playing at the beginning of the first lesson?

    Also here are the time points for the first one. I think if you copy them into your Youtube post you it will link directly to that time:

    Music
    Intro:
    1. The pick and how you hold it 2:00
    2. Placement of the pick in the mando 3:24
    3. Placement of the arm/wrist 4:30
    4. Relax 4:45
    5. Rest on the string below 5:10
    6. Doubling exercise 5:50
    Other lessons: 7:00

    For everyone's convenience, here are the two lessons embedded.



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  25. #18

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    My pleasure SOMorris, Rdean and Bad Habbits

  26. #19

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Hi Jim Garber,
    Lovely to hear from you! The first piece I played was the beginning of Oblivion (Piazzolla).
    I added your timings to youtube and it worked! Thank you.

  27. #20

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonjackson83 View Post
    I'll be honest, I've never really liked tremolo, and as a consequence, I've never learned to do it well!

    However, to be a good all-round musician I suppose I should be able to do it, and when would be a better time to learn and practise?

    I thought the first lesson was very good, clear and nicely paced, and I'm looking forward to the rest, so thank you Ruth.
    Thanks Gordon!

  28. #21

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonjackson83 View Post

    I thought the first lesson was very good, clear and nicely paced, and I'm looking forward to the rest, so thank you Ruth.
    Thanks Gordon.

  29. #22

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Ive just uploaded lesson 3. Its quite a dense lesson ...
    We learn 3 different methods which may be combined to produce the louds and softs with tremolo. We talk briefly about ensuring your tremolo matches the mood. How to play hell for leather and how to use tremolo to create brilliance or accent a note.
    Here is the link: https://youtu.be/k4l51_bftXw

    Stay safe, stay home, play the mandolin.

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  31. #23

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Thanks again, Ruth.

    Quick question: I know this question has generated a lot of back and forth on this forum, but my question is about anchoring when using tremolo. I have been practicing tremolo for a while now, and do not seem to be getting any better. When practicing tremolo on one open string at a time without anchoring, I can only do a halfway decent job with a metronome set at about 44 or maybe 46 bpm, with 4/4 time and tremoloing 32nd notes. If I rest the base of my hand/wrist on the strings just below the bridge, I can get significant faster. Otherwise, I seem to loose control of my pick hand, and the hand starts to move from my elbow more than from my wrist. I could not tell from your video whether you were resting the base of your hand or wrist on the mandolin or playing with just the mandolin "gripped" under your arm just below the elbow. Can you tell me what you recommend?

  32. #24
    Registered User Cobalt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Quote Originally Posted by gordonjackson83 View Post
    Heh heh, so it's up there with admitting to beating my wife or wearing corduroy?

    Seriously, playing trad Irish, Scottish and English tunes there's not a lot of need for tremolo.
    Depends very much on the repertoire. I use tremolo in Irish, Scottish, English, Russian, American ... it belongs everywhere for me.

  33. #25

    Default Re: Tremolo technique

    Hi SoMorris,
    Thank you for your question. It is hard to tremolo without anchoring somewhere. I rest my arm on the top of the mandolin but if you comfortable resting your wrist on the strings below the bridge thats logical to me.
    In terms of control at any speed I suggest you focus on resting your pick on the string below after each stroke. Just do down strokes at first and get used to the feel of the pick resting on the string below. Then start adding the ups.
    With the E string there is no string below to rest on so you have to sort of remember how it feels to play on the other strings and then try to emulate the feel on the E string.
    Hope that helps and happy playing!
    Ruth

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