Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 50

Thread: Why do people only sell the great ones?

  1. #1

    Default Why do people only sell the great ones?

    I've noticed that virtually every mandolin for sale in the classified is an incredible mandolin, often the best the seller has ever played. I have yet to see one of the duds, or even a mediocre one, come up for sale. Apparently, people only sell the great ones. Go figure.

  2. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to 1Yooper For This Useful Post:


  3. #2
    Registered User Tom Sanderson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Saint Augustine, FL
    Posts
    563

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Judge Judy calls it “puffing”

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tom Sanderson For This Useful Post:


  5. #3

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    LOL. Let's be realistic, one player's discard is another player's find. Although, I have sold some really great mandolins, in order to make room for some other really great mandolins. However, I do have a group of "I hope I never have to part with these" instruments.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  6. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Norfolk, VA
    Posts
    601

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Yooper View Post
    I've noticed that virtually every mandolin for sale in the classified is an incredible mandolin, often the best the seller has ever played,
    Certainly you have no idea what would be the best mandolin the seller has ever played. A flawed premise. But yes there are some wonderful instruments for sale in the classified.

  7. The following members say thank you to Hudmister for this post:


  8. #5
    Registered User Mark Seale's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    854

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Sales is sales...

    But, I've parted with an instrument that I thought was one of the best I played. The issue was it just didn't suit my hand, and I believe that if you start modifying an instrument (reshaping necks, etc) that you can alter what made that instrument great. I'd rather pass it on to someone else for whom it is better suited and played the way the luthier built it.

  9. The Following 7 Users Say Thank You to Mark Seale For This Useful Post:


  10. #6

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by Hudmister View Post
    Certainly you have no idea what would be the best mandolin the seller has ever played. A flawed premise. But yes there are some wonderful instruments for sale in the classified.
    I think that 1Yooper means that the seller says in the ad that it's the best they've ever played.

  11. The following members say thank you to David L for this post:


  12. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    364

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Maybe people only buy “the good ones”. Why would someone buy an instrument that they thought was mediocre in the first place?
    Mandolins: Dudenbostel A1 #74 (2014)
    Guitar: Bourgeois Custom Vintage Aged Tone Dreadnought

  13. #8

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    There are no bad mandolins.

  14. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to OldSausage For This Useful Post:


  15. #9
    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
    Posts
    566

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by OldSausage View Post
    There are no bad mandolins.
    Well, there was the one at my local pawnshop, where I could have named my own price, but didn't. The owner had lowered it to $50, and was ready to bargain. I'd call it more of a souvenir of Mexico than a musical instrument. He didn't tell me it was the best he'd ever played though, I'll give him that.
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

  16. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,155

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    I bought an exceptional (to me) mandolin that the seller was selling to fund the purchase of a new guitar. It can happen...

  17. #11

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Ever play someone’s “great” mandolin and think, “not for me”?
    Last edited by Mandobar; Feb-28-2020 at 12:58pm.

  18. The following members say thank you to Mandobar for this post:


  19. #12
    Confused... or?
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Over the Hudson & thru the woods from NYC
    Posts
    2,388

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by OldSausage View Post
    There are no bad mandolins.
    And some that might have, uhmm, "lesser" mandolins of minimal $ value (hey, we all started somewhere!) tend to keep them around to play out in the leaky canoe, or loan out, or just give away where needed ... with no need to bother the good folks here who have actual commerce to conduct.
    - Ed

    "What our group lacks in musicianship is offset by our willingness to humiliate ourselves." - David Hochman

  20. #13

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    In my case, the reason for selling was usually financial -- between jobs, etc. -- and my instruments being the only thing of value I had at the time. Doing so got me through to the next phase of my life -- so it was necessary, but stung a little at the time.

    I am old enough to have benefited from inflation and the vintage marketplace -- many of my "vintage" instruments were purchased as merely "used" or "trade-ins" as they were once called. So, selling a 50's Fender amp for $2500 seemed like a good deal to me considering I paid less than a third of that for it. Forget that to replace it in today's market would cost $25K....................which I would never spend for an amp, just as one example. Was it the greatest I ever played? Yep, it was pretty great!

  21. #14

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Somewhere there is a substandard Gilchrist, but the standard is pretty high. Same with Loars. I chuckle at dealers who describe every instrument they have as exceptional, a hoss, a banjo killer, etc. God forbid they give a real description that could help you. Then there are those that just state the brand and materials without any extra description. I prefer the latter.

    I often wonder how I’d describe my humble little Silverangel, the type of mandolin half would be well pleased with, the other half would not. I have no wish to sell it to the latter.

    I can see where someone could easily exceed their means and need to fix a car or something, or just plain have too many to play, or loose the ability to play. Many reasons to sell really. Could be as simple as getting the bluegrass bug and wanting punch above beauty, or heaven forbid, get addicted to a scroll.

    I’d like the average description to give at least a decent description of tone. Something like, it’s darker than the Collings I also own. But sales is sales in the end. And yes, best I’ve ever played is pretty meaningless if I’ve only owned a KM 150, no disrespect intended to a decent affordable mandolin.
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  22. #15

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Some dealers won’t carry what they believe they cannot sell.


    There are Gils that sound better, feel better than others. Same goes for other brands/builders. I find the 2000’s to be the timeframe for some of the most desirable Gils. It may just be that these have matured to a certain point over newer ones, but I’ve played five or six recently and they were all quite lively.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  23. #16
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    179

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Quote Originally Posted by 1Yooper View Post
    I've noticed that virtually every mandolin for sale in the classified is an incredible mandolin, often the best the seller has ever played. I have yet to see one of the duds, or even a mediocre one, come up for sale. Apparently, people only sell the great ones. Go figure.
    I'd be happy so sell you my Ibanez M510BS (first mando) if you want to end that trend.

  24. The following members say thank you to DaveGinNJ for this post:


  25. #17
    Registered User Mike Romkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bettendorf, Iowa
    Posts
    502
    Blog Entries
    8

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Ha ha! I am ADDICTED to looking at the Cafe classifieds. It’s the highlight of my day. I only allow myself to do it once with my morning coffee, and once after supper, or I’d probably have to join a 12-step program to separate myself from those listings. ...

    That said, I think the sellers are sincere sometimes, and just selling other times. It is kind of comical that some folks have learned the right terminology to insert into their ads, especially when it is clearly just a sales pitch. I keep expecting to see something like this:

    Must sell mandolin due to circumstances beyond my control. This is the best sounding mandolin I have ever played. A HOSS! Deep, woody lows, crystal-clear highs. Very even across the strings and up and down the neck. Deep, woody chop. A real banjo killer that will cut through every jam. Very Loar-like in tone. Selling due to (pick one: injury to hand, because I have a Gilchrist F5 on order, because the taxman is at my door, divorce). Johnson A-style, $75 or best offer.

    Now, back for just a sneak peak to see if anybody has adding an interesting mandolin for sale...
    '09 Gilchrist Model 1, “July 9” Red Diamond F-5, '12 Duff F-5, '19 Collings MT2, ’24 A2-Z, ’24 F-2, '13 Collings mandola, '82 D-35, Gibson Keb Mo.

  26. The Following 10 Users Say Thank You to Mike Romkey For This Useful Post:


  27. #18
    Registered User John Soper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Location
    Durham, NC
    Posts
    964

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    I have sold some very fine mandolins in my time - '23 Gibson A, Collings MT2, Gibson A2z, Duff F5, '23 Gibson F2, Ellis A5- usually as part of "catch and release", when I was catching something new. I never advertise as "best sounding" but have been told that several of these are 'lifers" to the person who bought them - and there are 2 I wish I hadn't sold, in retrospect. Some that I sold gave me hand issues playing them, some had a tone that I'd evolved away from or didn't fit my current needs, but all were really fine instruments & just needed to end up sitting in the right lap at that time.

  28. #19
    Registered User Joe Dodson's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    641

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    I sold a Collings MT I'd love to have back to fund a custom that didn't sound nearly as good to my ears. I don't know that it was the best I've ever played, but it was mighty good.

  29. The following members say thank you to Joe Dodson for this post:


  30. #20
    F5G & MD305 Astro's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Charleston SC
    Posts
    2,453

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    Because they figure the dogs just wont sell.

    For sale: Expensive mandolin looking instrument.
    Sounds harsh, twangy, muddled, yet brittle with thankfully low volume.
    Hard to play up and down the neck.
    Looks like it was rode hard and put up wet.
    The only reason Im selling is because I cant stand playing it.
    Comes with a really nice case... which doubles as my stomp box.
    Will accept any form of payment. Insurance not required.
    No matter where I go, there I am...Unless I'm running a little late.

  31. #21
    Registered User sblock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Redwood City, CA
    Posts
    2,101

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    So, OP, you'd rather see an ad like this?!

    For sale: Mandolin, F5-style. Undistinguished in every way. Still playable, but fairly high action, especially up the neck. A few frets are worn and likely need replacement. Comparatively low volume, and somewhat tinny on the high end. The bass end is soft and unobtrusive. Chops sometimes ring out, possibly due to sympathetic vibrations from somewhere. Hard to keep in tune; could use a re-stringing and possibly some work on the nut. Not sure what tonewoods were used. Neck is pretty straight up to the 12th fret, but leads to a small bend over the fretboard extension area. Shows both honest and dishonest play wear.

  32. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to sblock For This Useful Post:


  33. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Greer, SC
    Posts
    429

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    A story I heard over 50 years ago goes something like this. Segovia went to a store in Chicago. The man there said "I have the perfect guitar for you". Segovia played it and admittedly said it was a great guitar. The salesman said, "I think it is the perfect guitar for you." To which Segovia answered, "There are no such thing as a perfect guitar." This may help explain the all of the "great" mandolins for sale. I do know a fellow with a killer Collings for sale, and it is not me.

  34. The following members say thank you to Bob Buckingham for this post:


  35. #23

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    I too have sold 'The best mandolin I have ever played'.

    The reason was plain and simple: I was broke and I needed far more money than I would have gotten if I had sold my mediocre mandolin.

  36. #24
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Portland, OR
    Posts
    629

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    There's also the guy, every mandolin he sells is a TONE MONSTER!!!

    All caps always makes it feel like I'm being yelled at....

    Kirk

  37. #25
    Lurkist dhergert's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Blue Zone, California
    Posts
    1,350
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Why do people only sell the great ones?

    The saying among horse traders:

    The best horse is always the one sold for more than it is worth.
    -- Don

    "It is a lot more fun to make music than it is to argue about it."

    2002 Gibson F-9
    2016 MK LFSTB
    1975 Suzuki taterbug
    (plus a large assortment of banjos, dobros, guitars, basses and other noisemakers)
    [About how I tune my mandolins]
    [7/29/2019 -- New Arrival!!!]

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •