Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 30

Thread: collecting and playing mandolins ?

  1. #1

    Default collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Do experienced and, or, highly skilled players usually play only one mandolin or is owning and playing a collection of different style/type mandolins common ?

    For example, here is a video comparing a mandolin, mandola, and octave mandolin:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwJWduz0fSo

    From this video I understand the instruments are of different size, maybe different tuning (mandola) etc... , specialized for particular types of sounds/music etc.. but I am not sure if it is common for players to own and play all these different variations.

  2. #2

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Adam Steffey has played a large number of mandolins over his career. Tim Connell only has his trusty Arrow G.

    Takes all kinds.
    Not all the clams are at the beach

    Arrow G
    Clark 2 point
    Ratliff CountryBoy A
    00-21 (voiced by Eldon Stutzman)

  3. #3

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DGtryin View Post
    Do experienced and, or, highly skilled players usually play only one mandolin or is owning and playing a collection of different style/type mandolins common ?

    For example, here is a video comparing a mandolin, mandola, and octave mandolin:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HwJWduz0fSo

    From this video I understand the instruments are of different size, maybe different tuning (mandola) etc... , specialized for particular types of sounds/music etc.. but I am not sure if it is common for players to own and play all these different variations.
    I think you are asking two different questions. Do people own different instruments in the mandolin family? Yes, because they are different instruments with different ranges and uses. I see mandolin and mandocello as being as different as mandolin and guitar. They are just different instruments.

    The other question is "do people own multiple mandolins (A style, F style, oval hole, bowl back)"? Again, yes, but for different reasons. Some people use different mandolins for different tones and uses. Some use the same mandolin for everything. I own lots of different types of instruments, but mostly just one of each kind. I play my 1906 Gibson mandolin for mostly everything, but just recently put new strings on my Bruno bowl back for an Italian dinner and for Valentines day. That was more for the visual aesthetic than for the music.

  4. #4

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Talking strictly mandolins, I currently have three, and any of them will play any style I want them to, so most anyone can make do with one good mandolin. Now I have my thoughts as to what a good mandolin is, which is spending around $1200, but that is a different topic. As your playing interests change, you may find yourself looking for a particular sound a second mandolin might provide. Do not indulge in a second mandolin until you have that one “good” mandolin. In other words I’d council not to buy a cheaper oval hole mandolin when you have a cheaper f hole mandolin. If you want an oval hole for the style you are drawn to, make it the leap to that “good” mandolin.

    Now I never thought I’d be playing any bluegrass at all when I bought my first “good” mandolin, a used Silverangel. Sheer luck led me to buy a very versatile instrument that could cover all the bases. I could have it as my one and only, but I caught the f style bug, and later just wanted a teens Gibson. So now I have three mandolins in the “good” category, each with their own strengths. So that is one path to take. But I am toying with selling two to take another leap into the territory I’ll call “outstanding”. This is somewhat frightening because of the financial outlay.

    Your path most certainly will be different from mine. The one “good” mandolin you acquire, tailored to the style you choose to pursue, may be all you will ever need or want. Need and want are two separate subjects in and of themselves. I guess my point is to get to that “good” mandolin before any other issue is tackled. You take a quantum leap getting there. You can easily spend $6-10,000 getting to the next level. That would be akin to three steps in a staircase when that first jump was a flight.

    Be prepared to change along the way. You never know when you learn a fiddle tune you like to play was written by Bill Monroe, then another, then another. All of a sudden, that oval you bought to play Celtic doesn’t fit as well. Welcome to our world.

    - - - Updated - - -

    Talking strictly mandolins, I currently have three, and any of them will play any style I want them to, so most anyone can make do with one good mandolin. Now I have my thoughts as to what a good mandolin is, which is spending around $1200, but that is a different topic. As your playing interests change, you may find yourself looking for a particular sound a second mandolin might provide. Do not indulge in a second mandolin until you have that one “good” mandolin. In other words I’d council not to buy a cheaper oval hole mandolin when you have a cheaper f hole mandolin. If you want an oval hole for the style you are drawn to, make it the leap to that “good” mandolin.

    Now I never thought I’d be playing any bluegrass at all when I bought my first “good” mandolin, a used Silverangel. Sheer luck led me to buy a very versatile instrument that could cover all the bases. I could have it as my one and only, but I caught the f style bug, and later just wanted a teens Gibson. So now I have three mandolins in the “good” category, each with their own strengths. So that is one path to take. But I am toying with selling two to take another leap into the territory I’ll call “outstanding”. This is somewhat frightening because of the financial outlay.

    Your path most certainly will be different from mine. The one “good” mandolin you acquire, tailored to the style you choose to pursue, may be all you will ever need or want. Need and want are two separate subjects in and of themselves. I guess my point is to get to that “good” mandolin before any other issue is tackled. You take a quantum leap getting there. You can easily spend $6-10,000 getting to the next level. That would be akin to three steps in a staircase when that first jump was a flight.

    Be prepared to change along the way. You never know when you learn a fiddle tune you like to play was written by Bill Monroe, then another, then another. All of a sudden, that oval you bought to play Celtic doesn’t fit as well. Welcome to our world.

    Ps what causes these inadvertent doubling of a post?
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  5. #5

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Thanks all for the early replies, please keep them coming.
    The reason I initiated this topic is because I've noticed a several vast guitar collections. That is, some celebrities and, or, other people with the financial means to do so have accumulated collections of dozens of guitars. Presumably some legitimate professional players are collectors as well.
    I understand the guitar is a much more widely popular instrument than the mandolin, but I am curious to know if it is common (among proficient mandolin players) to have a personal inventory two, three, four or or more mandolins.
    And if the answer is yes, is the reason due to differences in sound ? Or is it that the mandolin is a form of visual art and the more beautiful pieces one has to own and admire the better ?
    I do not have any sort of refined "musical ear" so my assumption is that the primary reason for one to assemble a "collection" of mandolins is to create a variety of sounds and types of music. On the aforementioned guitar collector hobby it seems as though much of the collector impetus is about owning particular iconic/legendary historic models.

  6. #6

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    DGtryin said "my assumption is that the primary reason for one to assemble a "collection" of mandolins is to create a variety of sounds and types of music.

    Correct-a-mundo sir, different sounds. I have an f-hole F style, an oval hole F style both strictly acoustic, an f hole A style with piezo pickups and a solid body telecaster mandolin with magnetic p/u's for electric sounds. All of them are pretty fun for the sounds they are capable of producing.

    Len B.
    Clearwater, FL

  7. #7
    Registered User Jean Andreasen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Land of 10,000 Lakes
    Posts
    10

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    And sometimes we buy instruments because we simply appreciate the artisan work of the luthier.

  8. The following members say thank you to Jean Andreasen for this post:

    lenf12 

  9. #8

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    I was in a store once and an older couple were looking to get a mandolin for their daughter so she could play music with her boyfriend. I was showing the differences between mandolins, most notably oval vs f hole and A style vs F. I finally asked them what kind of music did the boyfriend play and they said bluegrass. I picked up a nice used Eastman MD 815 and said this one then. The wife asked why, I answered because. No other justification other than tradition. Chances are the boyfriend will approve.

    Sure, plenty play bluegrass on A styles. As for collecting, if you have extra disposable income, you tend to spend it on what you enjoy. If you're married to Elizabeth Taylor, that could be a diamond the size of a golf ball. Into cars? A vintage Ferrari might work for you. Some will think we are crazy for having a $10,000 mandolin. I might think it crazy to buy that fly rod. I might think it crazy to own four or five Gibson ferns, but why would someone buy an oval flat top if all you played was bluegrass? Then there is the inlay and binding, just bought for the sheer beauty of it. That and the fact they tend to used the premium wood on those and they sound great. Then there is the pure collector who may just like them. I'm no fiddler, but owning a Guarni would be really nice. There are as many different reasons as there are people.

    But as I said before, focus on getting one good mandolin and see where that takes you.
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  10. #9

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    That usually takes you on the hunt for the next "good one"

    Len B.
    Clearwater, FL

  11. #10
    Registered User Mike Romkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Bettendorf, Iowa
    Posts
    443
    Blog Entries
    8

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    The more the merrier, if you ask me! I play all of mine.
    '09 Gilchrist Model 1, “July 9” Red Diamond F-5, '12 Duff F-5, ’24 A2-Z, ’24 F-2, '13 Collings mandola, '19 Pava Player, '82 D-35, Gibson Keb Mo.

  12. #11
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    23,153
    Blog Entries
    52

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DGtryin View Post
    Do experienced and, or, highly skilled players usually play only one mandolin or is owning and playing a collection of different style/type mandolins common ?
    I don't know any musicians, at any level of proficiency, professional or not, that eventually do not have more than one of whatever it is they play. Strings, woodwinds, brass, percussion, keyboards, all of them tend to acquire.


    I do not have any sort of refined "musical ear" so my assumption is that the primary reason for one to assemble a "collection" of mandolins is to create a variety of sounds and types of music.
    There are many many reasons. Some to have a full more full pallet, for different types of music, or perhaps some are better for recording others better for performing others better for jamming others better for electrifying.

    There is also having a primary mandolin one uses consistently, but is rather valuable or maybe not replaceable, and so having a mandolin for camping and travel.

    There is also owning great examples of different luthiers' art.

    There is collection the entire family, a mandolin, mandola, mandocello, and a bass if possible.

    There is also having one of each style. One F with f holes one F with oval holes one A with F holes one A with oval holes one flat top one bowl back ...


    But I believe that the most popular strategy of accumulation is some rationalized version of ISI/ILI/IBI - I saw it, I liked it, I bought it. This has been my strategy from the beginning.

    And I have come to believe that the reason for this is that there is a gigantic flood of endorphins, creating great joy, in acquiring a new to you mandolin. And to deprive yourself of that great joy only because you already have a mandolin, is not something most people can do.
    Last edited by JeffD; Feb-15-2020 at 7:43pm.
    Indulge responsibly!

    The entire staff
    funny....

  13. #12
    Registered User Eric Platt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    949

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Have a number of friends who are professional players that only have one mandolin. At least, I've only seen one. They may have others, but rely on one instrument. Also know folks who have multiple instruments, but play just one 90 percent of the time.

    Is one a better player when only owning a single instrument? Maybe. But there are also a lot of great players with multiple. So impossible for me to say. I have many (too many?) because I collect thing. Maybe if I would invest in a seriously good instrument then it would be a different story.
    1935 Gibson A50, 2018 Collings MT, 1989 Flatiron Performer A, 1929 Gibson A Jr., 1935 Kalamazoo KM-21, 2018 Eastman MDO-305
    http://ericplatt.weebly.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/LauluAika/
    https://www.lauluaika.com/
    https://www.facebook.com/Longtine-Pl...4404553312723/

  14. #13
    Some Ability - No Talent MikeZito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,599
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    As touched on by DG in post #5 - there are many occasions where there is a distinct line between 'collecting' instruments and 'playing' them.

    In short - although such instruments may occasionally get played, some instruments are undoubtedly bought as 'collectors items' . . . that is to say, more for their rarity and increasing monetary value, than to be used as an everyday player. (i.e., I would not hesitate to guess that there are a certain percentage of Gibson Loar mandolins and 1954 Fender Stratocaster's in the hands of folks who are simply holding on to them, rarely ever to be played at all, but for the sole purpose of making a return on their investment, some years down the road.) Well known player/collectors like guitarist Rick Nielsen from the band Cheap Trick emphatically states that he DOES play all of his collectible guitars, and takes them out on the road with him - but I would be more than willing to bet that he has more than a couple of pieces in his collection that he is more-than-hesitant to give too much leeway with.

  15. #14

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    I will say this: the less time you spend perusing the Mandolin Cafe forum and classifieds, the fewer mandolins you will buy.

  16. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to OldSausage For This Useful Post:


  17. #15
    Registered User foldedpath's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    4,978

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DGtryin View Post
    The reason I initiated this topic is because I've noticed a several vast guitar collections. That is, some celebrities and, or, other people with the financial means to do so have accumulated collections of dozens of guitars. Presumably some legitimate professional players are collectors as well.
    I played guitar for 30-odd years before picking up a mandolin. From my perspective, there are many more possible variants and applications for guitar compared to mandolin, so a variety made sense to me with the music I was playing at the time -- Blues, "Americana fingerstyle" and entry-level Jazz.

    As recently as 10 years ago, I owned three solidbody electric guitars, one archtop electric guitar, one electric lap steel, three antique metal body Dobro resonator guitars, one acoustic steel string guitar, one nylon string guitar, and a fretless electric bass. All different voices, and I played them all.

    Once I discovered mandolin, I never really felt the need to have that many different voices or playing methods. The classic "Gibson-ish" carved archtop F-hole model I play can handle everything I've thrown at it, including Blues and Jazz, before I settled into playing almost exclusively Irish and Scottish traditional music. The only expansion in voice was lateral, with an octave mandolin that I use for slower-paced tunes. I did try a mandola at one point, but it didn't stick.

    After getting into mandolin, I sold off all the guitars except the one acoustic steel string and the one nylon string guitar. I'm still not immune to wanting a different voice sometimes, which is why I started learning "Irish" flute a few years ago. It's another lateral move; a different window into the Irish trad I'm playing now.

  18. #16
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,086

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Well, I've got 'em all, from Weber "piccolo" mandolin to mando-bass (ya know, I've gotta update my signature some time; doesn't reflect recent acquisitions and trade-ins). More than a dozen instruments overall.

    Why?

    1. As mentioned above, they're all different: look different, sound different, are suited for differing styles of music and performance situations. I may need that ol' bowl-back mandola or mandocello for a historical program, the '30's National Triolian to play some blues. the Flatiron "bouzouki" for a gig with my Celtic band.

    B. Since I have a significant, though modest, income from performing and teaching, I have no qualms about using some of that money to purchase instruments that catch my fancy. I now list my occupation as "musician" on my IRS forms, though thank heavens, I don't need to support Joan and myself on what I'm making.

    III. I consider my mandolins -- and banjos, guitars, Autoharps, ukes, concertinas etc. -- an accumulation rather than a collection, since there's no overall strategy or objective involved, just acquiring things I like. I've played every instrument "for pay" at least once -- yeah, even the Gibson "tenor lute" -- so I can claim the price of each as a business expense. And I have done "show and tell" programs where I demo-ed and explained some of the weirder instruments; the Oscar Schmidt Guitaro was a favorite, as were the cello banjo and the Waldo bowl-back mandocello.

    There are certain mandolins that get played a lot, and others that get played hardly at all. Right now I'm spending 75% of my mando time with my Larson brothers Stahl mandola; in the past, I was seldom seen at a jam or sing-around without my Strad-O-Lin mandolin. Just the opposite for the Howe-Orme mandolinetto, or the Holdrio Piccolo "pocket" mandolin (let's just say I know where to find them if needed). I've weeded out a few, using them as trade-ins; said "farewell" to two Eastmans, the DGM-1 mandolin and the MDA615 mandola.

    So the "herd" can be (slightly) "thinned," or new critters can be added to the corral. As I coast through my 70's, I look ahead to selling off the ones the kids don't want, which will be most of them. Hey, you youngsters out there, within a decade I predict there'll be a lot of instruments on the market here in Rochester! Save your pennies...
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  19. #17
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Fort Lauderdale, FL
    Posts
    2,877

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by allenhopkins View Post
    As I coast through my 70's, I look ahead to selling off the ones the kids don't want, which will be most of them. Hey, you youngsters out there, within a decade I predict there'll be a lot of instruments on the market here in Rochester! Save your pennies...
    When you’re ready to unload the Sobell for the $800 you have in it — less depreciation over the last 35 years, of course — I hope to be first in line!
    1924 Gibson A Snakehead
    2005 National RM-1
    2007 Hester A5
    2009 Passernig A5
    2015 Black A2-z
    2010 Black GBOM
    2017 Poe Scout
    2011 Passernig F5
    2018 Vessel TM5

  20. The following members say thank you to pheffernan for this post:


  21. #18
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    23,153
    Blog Entries
    52

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by OldSausage View Post
    I will say this: the less time you spend perusing the Mandolin Cafe forum and classifieds, the fewer mandolins you will buy.
    There is some truth to that. You will save a bunch of money if you never see that thing you have wanted all your life and can't live without.
    Indulge responsibly!

    The entire staff
    funny....

  22. #19
    Innocent Bystander JeffD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    23,153
    Blog Entries
    52

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by JeffD View Post
    And I have come to believe that the reason for this is that there is a gigantic flood of endorphins, creating great joy, in acquiring a new to you mandolin. And to deprive yourself of that great joy only because you already have a mandolin, is not something most people can do.
    All hale Rod Neep. Demonstrating the naked joy of a new mandolin. Watch this and you will no longer be confused as to why we keep wanting new ones.

    Indulge responsibly!

    The entire staff
    funny....

  23. The following members say thank you to JeffD for this post:


  24. #20
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    16,086

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by pheffernan View Post
    When you’re ready to unload the Sobell for the $800 you have in it — less depreciation over the last 35 years, of course — I hope to be first in line!
    Well -- when my stuff goes on sale, it'll be brokered by some established dealer, and I'll be glad to pay his/her commission to avoid the hassle of selling instruments myself. I've held on to some mandolins for quite a while; besides the Sobell, I have a '50's Gibson F-5 and a 1910 3-point F-2, each of which cost me $1500 when I bought them more than 40 years ago -- about the time I bought Martin Simpson's Sobell from a local dealer where he'd traded it on a Gibson mandolin to re-sell in the UK at a profit.

    I optimistically project that my "vintage" instruments have price-appreciated faster than inflation. However, who knows what the instrument market will be like, when I get around to disposing of them. I paid, I think, about $400 net for a '57 Martin D-18, with after-market scalloped braces, back in the early '70's. Bernunzio allowed me $3K as trade-in on the Larson-made Stahl mando-bass. If I could count on similar increases, I'd have a nice little nest egg to add to my estate when it's passed on to the kids.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  25. The following members say thank you to allenhopkins for this post:


  26. #21
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,124

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by DGtryin View Post
    Thanks all for the early replies, please keep them coming.
    ... but I am curious to know if it is common (among proficient mandolin players) to have a personal inventory two, three, four or or more mandolins.
    And if the answer is yes, is the reason due to differences in sound ? Or is it that the mandolin is a form of visual art and the more beautiful pieces one has to own and admire the better ?
    I do not have any sort of refined "musical ear" so my assumption is that the primary reason for one to assemble a "collection" of mandolins is to create a variety of sounds and types of music.
    I have guitars also, a 12-string, a couple of 6-string steel string, and a couple of nylon-string, I own them for their different sounds. I also own several mandolins, they all have different sounds and different purposes for me. None of my instruments are what I call "high-end," my most expensive guitar was $1000, most were about $200 or less, and my most expensive mandolin was $2500. I put expensive mandolins at $4000 or higher. But my more expensive mandolins are all very high quality.

  27. The following members say thank you to LadysSolo for this post:


  28. #22
    Registered User Bob Clark's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Beautiful Salem County, NJ
    Posts
    1,666

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    If you read Fretboard Journal, which I HIGHLY recommend, you will learn about the instruments owned by some of the top players, well known and less-so. From my reading of that journal, it seems that lots of top players have many instruments and for some, these are muses, even if they only play a few out. They also sometimes call on them for a new voice on a recording, even if it is only for a song or two. Some of them are quite prolific in their collecting. Others that I have read about there have few instruments and prefer just to rely on those. Have a look at the latest edition and you will find at least one example of each type of player.

    For some of us that play out, having more than one voice is part of our craft. For example, at a gig last Friday evening, I played mostly my Ovation mandolin, but also my Mike Black piccolo mandolin (which the audience really digs) and my Weber OM which is great for my duo's Renaissance-era repertoire.

    Additionally, for a lot of us, seeking, purchasing, maybe moving on, and dreaming of mandolin-family instruments is part of the hobby. It may be even more than a hobby; it is a big part of our lives. And it can be quite a healthy outlet for our enthusiasm. We gain pleasure from that as well as from the music we make. So if that's the case, why not do it? On the other hand, if mandolin monogamy is for you, do that. There is room for all types of us here in the Cafe, and in the world. Whatever you are enjoying, enjoy it fully!
    Purr more, hiss less.

  29. #23

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Collecting is like duck hunting.......you watch and wait, you find one, you play it and you peg the ones you want to keep. But you have got to be prepared to bag one when it comes around.
    There's nothing better than first-hand experience.

  30. #24

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandobar View Post
    Collecting is like duck hunting.......you watch and wait, you find one, you play it and you peg the ones you want to keep. But you have got to be prepared to bag one when it comes around.
    On the other hand, don't send your dog to fetch it.

  31. #25
    man about town Markus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Madison, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,941
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: collecting and playing mandolins ?

    I'm a monogamous mandolin player - I played my first mandolin until I got my Breedlove and then sold the first mando and just played/owned one for 8 years.

    In the last year I picked up an electric solid body as that's a whole different instrument/use - as well as upgraded to a Collings MT2. Since then the Breedlove has been in the case, only pulled out twice to realize that my Collings is `all that and a bag of chips' as my wife put it.

    I'll always keep my old Breedlove for a backup in case I have gigs and the Collings is in the shop. They have different voices, but I find specializing on one mandolin seems to improve my touch with that instrument and exploring all the possibilities of that one instrument. The better I know it, the more I feel it can do anything I would want a mandolin to do.

    Every time I pick up that Collings I am thankful I didn't accumulate a collection of mandolins and instead saved that decade of gig money for `one mandolin to rule them all' as Sauron would say.

    .... now, that doesn't preclude me from starting to save for an Octave Mandolin but like the solid body electric IMO it's such a different sound and use for me that like my guitar it's a different instrument altogether.
    Collings MT2
    Breedlove OF
    Ellie eMando
    Schmergl Devastator

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •