Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 35 of 35

Thread: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

  1. #26
    Registered User Tavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tavistock UK
    Posts
    4,044

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    >I've seen in Martin and Embergher bowlbacks a small "stiffener plate" of wood reinforcing the top between the topmost brace and the neck joint. I've been adding one in on all my bowlbacks as a precautionary measure.

    Nod. Most of the better (or at least better preserved) makes had those.

    You can also add small longitudinal braces either side of the sound hole to prevent (further) crumpling without impacting on the sound - indeed many builders like to add reinforcement around there to improve the sound!

  2. #27

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    The original ad does state "Tortoise Celluloid Guard Plate." I don't know if this model was made by L & H or was made by Regal for the company. Certainly, Regal made very similar looking instruments and L & H did sell out to Tonk Bros in the late 20s. At $25 it was not a cheap instrument- neither was it a super expensive one but I am sure it has merit if in playable order. I bought a very cheap Regal on eBay that needed plenty of work. The photos were not great but I have to admit that when it arrived, it had the most enormous warp on the top which did not show. I have told my luthier, that if he thinks what I bring around to him is real junk, then I have something very special to show him, one day if he's really unlucky. One of the sides is also warped and although I know he could fix it, it would be a waste of his time and I have more appealing and worthy boxes that need treatment. Yes, I was also hoping it was made of Koa but it is birch made to look like Koa but it did have a nice rope style binding to add to the deception! Here is one that is photographed so you can see it is birch!

    https://reverb.com/item/116612-regal...mandolin-1920s

  3. #28
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Palmer, Texas
    Posts
    3,333

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    Quote Originally Posted by NickR View Post
    The original ad does state "Tortoise Celluloid Guard Plate."
    The craigslist ad I linked to says "Real Tortoise Shell Pickguard" - that would indicate real, natural shell - but that is incorrect, because the mandolin has a celluloid plastic "imitation tortoise" guard plate. The celluloid isn't too bad yet, for approaching the 100 year mark, but we all know that it will continue to degrade now.

    BTW, seller has lowered the price to $150 now. Still a bit high for me in its condition, but closer to reason now.
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  4. #29
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    26,749

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    For your information, here's the full page from L&H catalog featuring this mandolin in 1924.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WashburnF-G-1924.jpg 
Views:	21 
Size:	323.5 KB 
ID:	182360
    Jim

    My Stream on Soundcloud
    Facebook
    19th Century Tunes
    Playing lately:
    2018 Campanella A-5 -- 2007 Brentrup A4C -- 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin -- Huss & Dalton DS -- 1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead -- '83 Flatiron A5-2 -- 1939 Gibson L-00 -- 1936 Epiphone Deluxe -- 1928 Gibson L-5 -- ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo -- ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo -- ca. 1920 Weymann Style 25 Mandolin-Banjo -- National RM-1

  5. The following members say thank you to Jim Garber for this post:


  6. #30
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor/Austin
    Posts
    5,235

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    Great Ad, Jim!

    Very interesting to read the text below where Washburn is still offering bowlbacks in their 1924 catalog.

    I would have thought they were done making them long before then. Maybe they kept up limited production into the '20s or perhaps this is NOS.

    The ad copy is worth repeating:

    "To the many Mandolin players....who believe that the Bowl Shaped Mandolins possess a quality of tone all their own, we take pardonable pride in offer the following.....

    We sincerely believe that the further improvements we have made in the New Series instruments will establish them more firmly in the favor of lovers of fine instruments the World over.

    ......and the wonderful tone quality and absolute correctness of scale will appeal to all who take pride in performing on a really superior instrument."

    I hope David finds the conversation....

    Mick
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Screen Shot 2019-12-30 at 10.08.55 PM.jpg 
Views:	14 
Size:	28.3 KB 
ID:	182366  
    Ever tried, ever failed? No matter. Try again, fail again. Fail better.--Samuel Beckett
    ______________________

    '05 Cuisinart Toaster
    '93 Chuck Taylor lowtops
    '12 Stetson Open Road
    '06 Bialetti expresso maker
    '14 Irish Linen Ramon Puig

  7. #31
    Full Grown and Cussin' brunello97's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Ann Arbor/Austin
    Posts
    5,235

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tavy View Post
    >
    You can also add small longitudinal braces either side of the sound hole to prevent (further) crumpling without impacting on the sound - indeed many builders like to add reinforcement around there to improve the sound!
    That's what I know, John. I've seen these on Emberghers and have added them on numerous bowls myself. Small bit of work but it offers a bit of peace of mind.

    Mick
    Ever tried, ever failed? No matter. Try again, fail again. Fail better.--Samuel Beckett
    ______________________

    '05 Cuisinart Toaster
    '93 Chuck Taylor lowtops
    '12 Stetson Open Road
    '06 Bialetti expresso maker
    '14 Irish Linen Ramon Puig

  8. #32
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Palmer, Texas
    Posts
    3,333

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tavy View Post
    * Add a brace over that area if there isn't one already to stop the problem from reoccurring.
    Quote Originally Posted by brunello97 View Post
    I've seen in Martin and Embergher bowlbacks a small "stiffener plate" of wood reinforcing the top between the topmost brace and the neck joint. I've been adding one in on all my bowlbacks as a precautionary measure.
    Mick, Tavy: Would a sound-post sort of dowel be helpful in that location in a flat back instrument like the one in OP? Would it be very detrimental to sound? Would it add too much stress to back plate?
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  9. #33
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    S.W. Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,250

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    A sound post should not be tight and is not for support per say. I would go with the stiffener recommended. I have done this for an octave mandolin and it worked well, and wasn't that hard to do.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  10. #34
    Registered User Tavy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Tavistock UK
    Posts
    4,044

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    >Mick, Tavy: Would a sound-post sort of dowel be helpful in that location in a flat back instrument like the one in OP? Would it be very detrimental to sound? Would it add too much stress to back plate?

    Aaaaaaaah, please no!

    Sound posts are for violins, they kill the sound from mandolin style instruments, if you're going to do it, do it properly

  11. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Tavy For This Useful Post:


  12. #35
    Registered User Timbofood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Kalamazoo, MI.
    Posts
    7,075

    Default Re: Is this old Washburn worth restoring?

    Jim, thanks for posting the advertisement!
    I really love the simple terminology especially
    “Dull finish”
    None of this “Satin” or “Matte” or “Low Gloss” nonsense! It’s just Dull. Pretty easy to imagine really.
    The old catalog pages are such fun to read, the gentle self promotion, the elegance. No big hype, just the Joe Friday take.
    Timothy F. Lewis
    "If brains was lard, that boy couldn't grease a very big skillet" J.D. Clampett

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •