Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

  1. #1
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,361
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    It is always a treat to learn of luthiers 'across the pond'. Bob has found another very nice instrument that we might not 'ever be aware of' in the States.

    A collection of fine instruments is the best justification for MAS. Ha, ha.

    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  2. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to DougC For This Useful Post:


  3. #2

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    My word, those first few chords on that octave mando are amazing! That tone and power. Wow. Thanks for posting.

  4. #3
    Registered User Gunnar's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Location
    Balama, Mozambique, Africa, Earth
    Posts
    578

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    The first thing I thought seeing the title was "hey, that's the same name as Olga Egorova's octave"
    Mandolin: Kentucky KM150
    Other instruments: way too many, and yet, not nearly enough.

    My blog: https://theoffgridmusician.music.blog/
    My YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UChF...yWuaTrtB4YORAg
    My Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/africanbanjogunnar/
    Free backing tracks:
    https://backingtrackers.wordpress.com/

  5. #4
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,361
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    Bob has such a nice collection of instruments. I would hope he would 'showcase' each one in a video.

    And Olga. I knew I'd seen that OM somewhere. (Mandolin Mondays).
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  6. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to DougC For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    Hey,

    thank you all for commenting and especially Doug for moving my vid to the right place here. No problem to produce an extended vid showcasing all my 8-stringed instruments. I will work on it.
    Northfield F5 Artist VIE
    Collings MF 5
    Gibson F 2 (1917)
    Lawrence Smart H 5 Mandola
    Gibson K 4 Mandocello (1921)
    Sobell 10-string Cittern
    Sanden 8-string Bouzouki
    Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    guitars, banjo, dobro, weissenborn

  8. The following members say thank you to mando-bob for this post:

    Gunnar 

  9. #6
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,361
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    Bob, now we're 'in the right place', I'd like to ask you what it is like to find 'good qualities' in stringed instruments. I assume you bought each instrument for a different task like lead and accompaniment, and some acquired for specialized types of music for example the bouzouki for Irish music.
    So what role does the OM play? And how are the others used?

    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  10. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    51

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by DougC View Post
    Bob, now we're 'in the right place', I'd like to ask you what it is like to find 'good qualities' in stringed instruments. I assume you bought each instrument for a different task like lead and accompaniment, and some acquired for specialized types of music for example the bouzouki for Irish music.
    So what role does the OM play? And how are the others used?

    Mmh, that's a good question, Doug. First of all I would say it's MAS. I love the sound of a good quality stringed instrument, no matter what kind. That's why my studio is full of guitars, dobros, lap slide guitars, mandolin family instruments, banjos .... So it is not so much buying for different tasks or styles of music but for the love of the sound.
    I started with mandolin 30 years ago, listening to people like Sam Bush, David Grisman and John Reischman. At the same time I listened to a lot of Irish music, and especially a band named "Planxty" caught my attention. The playing of Andy Irvine and Donal Lunny led me to the bouzouki, and in 1999 I ordered my first Irish bouzouki. It was made by Michael Sanden from Sweden - fine luthier, beautiful instrument, still own it (previously posted it here). 10 years ago I found a pre-owned Sobell 10-string. Sobells are considered to be the "holy grail" of Irish bouzoukis by many, and mine proved it. Delicate sound with the lightest touch, powerful, and the low D-string adds something I missed before. A friend of mine calls it "sound sculpture". I use it often, not only for Irish music. It can add some magic to a singer/songwriter arrangement, especially when playing ballads.
    I run a studio and do a lot of recording stuff and arranging, so it is great to chose among different sonic colors like mandocello, mandola, bouzouki, cittern and octave mandolin.
    I listened a lot to mandolin orchestra music, even played a bit of that arrangements using mandola or mandocello.
    Right now I'm not sure where the octave mandolin fills in, but my OM has such a lovely throaty sound that I had to buy it - without any plan.
    Hope that makes sense.
    Cheers,
    Bob
    Northfield F5 Artist VIE
    Collings MF 5
    Gibson F 2 (1917)
    Lawrence Smart H 5 Mandola
    Gibson K 4 Mandocello (1921)
    Sobell 10-string Cittern
    Sanden 8-string Bouzouki
    Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    guitars, banjo, dobro, weissenborn

  11. #8
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,361
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Thijs van der Harst Octave Mandolin

    Yes, sir. Your comments make a lot of sense.

    The sound of stringed instruments have such depth and character. For example that extra D on the Sobell 10-string really adds power to the chord.

    Some guitar collectors look for subtle differences in their guitars. It seems that we prefer a wider choice of tonality.

    I've collected a few instruments over the years and now feel like I live in a music store and can grab a guitar, mandola, fiddle or mandolin at a 'whim' and enjoy what it has to offer.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •