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Thread: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

  1. #26
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Quote Originally Posted by Cary Fagan View Post
    Right, DoubleE, I'm curious about people's experience, not in defining for anyone else what works in old time. There's no doubt all mandolins can be played. I personally prefer the oval sound in old time, which is why I don't usually take my Passernig F5 which is as fine an F5 as I need ever to own. I take my Gibson A style oval hole (made by someone in Quebec 30 years ago and visible in my avatar).

    Bob, we met a few years ago at Swannanoa in a class with Paul Brown and talked quite a bit about mandolins. And now I remember the Weber, which I believe you were playing. Your experience with it and the Girouard is the kind of thing I'm looking for. I don't see you claiming any preference for them or your Elkhorn F hole, which is interesting.

    Thanks.
    Hey Cary,

    Thought I recognized your name. I was playing a Gerald Anderson A that week I think. I picked up the Girouard this past year. It is a good sounding mandolin but not nearly as good as the Absoroka but better than the old Gibson A they had in the shop that day. The Elkhorn is excellent and I tend to gravitate to that. I think any mandolin that speaks to the player is good for whatever they want to play. Since I don't just play old time, it is fun to have a tonal range available. The Elkhorn has tons of tone and lots of bark but does not sound like those old oval holes at all.

    Bob

  2. #27
    Registered User Cary Fagan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Hey Bob, funny I don't seem to remember the Anderson. Maybe you brought in the Weber for a class after we talked about it. Or just mentioned it. This reminds me to take out your and Amy's CD that I have since I haven't heard it for a while. Those Elkhorns look very nice in photos. I'm happy with my mandos but, well, you never know. Hope to see you again some time.
    Cary Fagan

  3. #28
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Sound wise, what do we think the difference between a long-scale and standard scale oval mandolin is? Is there some consistent difference that you would expect to hear? I have not played enough different ones to look for commonalities that outweigh the differences from one mandolin to another.

  4. #29
    Registered User DoubleE's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Buckingham View Post
    I picked up the Girouard this past year. It is a good sounding mandolin but not nearly as good as the Absoroka but better than the old Gibson A they had in the shop that day. The Elkhorn is excellent and I tend to gravitate to that. I think any mandolin that speaks to the player is good for whatever they want to play. Since I don't just play old time, it is fun to have a tonal range available. The Elkhorn has tons of tone and lots of bark but does not sound like those old oval holes at all.

    Bob
    Hey Bob,

    Iím just having a little fun here, but if youíre jamming with the Elkhorn and youíre wife is jamming with the Absoroka who babysits the Girouard? Iím willing to oblige if Iím in the area. And Iím assuming if youíre at home and want to play a few tunes you grab the Elkhorn?

  5. #30
    Registered User DoubleE's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Quote Originally Posted by A 4 View Post
    Sound wise, what do we think the difference between a long-scale and standard scale oval mandolin is? Is there some consistent difference that you would expect to hear? I have not played enough different ones to look for commonalities that outweigh the differences from one mandolin to another.
    Tone is a very subjective thing. It takes time to develope. Iíve played guitar for 30+ years and I have an understanding of the differences between builders, body sizes, scale lengths, woods and construction. I can hear the differences. In the world of mandolins Iím still learning. I can hear the differences between an F hole, an oval hole and a flat top. Not much more beyond that. But life is for learning. And the most important thing is to play an instrument that feels right and sounds good to you. Sorry, I canít really answer your questions.

  6. #31
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Question about 'hybrid' mandolins in old time

    Remember that the introduction of the "long neck" F-5 didn't change the mandolin's scale length; the bridge just moved closer to the neck, more centered on the mandolin's body. Distance from nut to bridge varied little; Gibson standard, I believe, was 13 7/8 inches.

    An oval-hole will of necessity have the bridge located further "south" than an f-hole, unless the soundhole's located up toward the "shoulders." How much further -- how this will affect scale length -- will depend on design.
    Allen Hopkins
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