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Thread: Six string electric

  1. #1
    Registered User mandolinstew's Avatar
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    Default Six string electric

    Sometimes I like 8 strings sometimes I like 4.So I now have e and a double and d and g single 11,13,20,30.I like it.Pyramid flatwounds.Using acoustic simulator,chorus and phase 90 pedals.

  2. #2
    Americana in France? Daniel Nestlerode's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    I have had those kinds of thoughts myself.

    Best of both worlds! Enjoy!

    Daniel

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    Registered User mandolinstew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    I knew you'd have a positive comment Daniel.My band switches from country to blues to folk and rock. Douglas

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    Registered User Gunnar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    Oh cool, I thought it was gonna be a joke about a guitar
    Mandolin: Kentucky KM150
    Other instruments: way too many, and yet, not nearly enough.

    My blog: https://theoffgridmusician.music.blog/
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  5. #5
    Americana in France? Daniel Nestlerode's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    Quote Originally Posted by mandolinstew View Post
    I knew you'd have a positive comment Daniel.My band switches from country to blues to folk and rock. Douglas
    Back in the late 80s for about 5mins Alvarez made a 9 string guitar. Totally melted my butter. Likewise Martin made (may still be making) a Roger McGuinn model guitar with 7 strings (the 7th being an octave on the G string). Very intriguing.

    Seems a natural idea to combine double strung courses and single strung courses in an emando. Even on my Arrow (15" scale) the e sting is too tight to bend much. Might as well think about doubling it!

    Show us some photos!

    (I play country, folk, and rock too, these days. Have not been brave enough to perform Blues.)


    Daniel

  6. #6

    Default Re: Six string electric

    I had a couple years of success making 9-string guitars for clients. They provide a wonderful chime like a 12-string but aren't as tasking as a 12 and don't threaten as much to make a flat top guitar self destruct. There are no rules except those related to the physical strength of the instrument.

    With a six-string electric, you could always modify it in a number of different ways to suit an inspiration and return it back if it went south. For my mandolas and octave-mandolins, I like to split the pairs by octave for strings 3 and 4. There are no rules.

    I think more than half of beginning guitar players get a desire to buy a 12-string. Very few stick with it and then more than half of these instrument last more than 10 years before they self destruct. Good 12-string electric guitars are few and far between and the 12-string Ric is a hit or miss - some of them are pigs despite being beautiful and expensive. I've had only two go across my bench that I liked but then only instruments with problems are brought to my shop.

  7. #7
    Registered User mandolinstew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    Quote Originally Posted by Wrnchbndr View Post
    I had a couple years of success making 9-string guitars for clients. They provide a wonderful chime like a 12-string but aren't as tasking as a 12 and don't threaten as much to make a flat top guitar self destruct. There are no rules except those related to the physical strength of the instrument.

    With a six-string electric, you could always modify it in a number of different ways to suit an inspiration and return it back if it went south. For my mandolas and octave-mandolins, I like to split the pairs by octave for strings 3 and 4. There are no rules.

    I think more than half of beginning guitar players get a desire to buy a 12-string. Very few stick with it and then more than half of these instrument last more than 10 years before they self destruct. Good 12-string electric guitars are few and far between and the 12-string Ric is a hit or miss - some of them are pigs despite being beautiful and expensive. I've had only two go across my bench that I liked but then only instruments with problems are brought to my shop.
    Gonna try octaves on the 3 and 4

  8. #8
    Registered User mandolinstew's Avatar
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    Default Re: Six string electric

    Cool Wes Montgomery sound with the split 3 & 4.

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