Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 25 of 32

Thread: Parting with a beloved mandolin

  1. #1
    Pittsburgh Bill
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Am I the only one that feels a deep emotional detachment when parting with a mandolin that has been for 7 years a delight to play and care for.? Perhaps like loosing a beloved pet?
    This past week I placed an order for a relatively big upgrade necessitating that I simultaneously offer for sale an instrument that I have loved playing and treated with the utmost of care. This instrument was adopted (hand picked) from a group of five sister mandolins for it's sweetness of tone and other qualities we look for in a mandolin.
    While I look forward with great anticipation to receiving my new custom build I look at my soon to be sold mandolin with melancholy. My gut says that I should have both but being retired on a fixed income and an appetite for extensive RV travel, my head tells me that is just not in the cards.
    I am sure I will lament the loss of this mandolin and always remember the joy it provided while thinking about the luck of a new owner that will surely be enjoying it as much as I did.
    For others that have felt this way let me know how long I should expect this feeling of gloom over the sale to last. Previous sales of mandolins I have owned have not had this impact.
    Keith Edward Coleman A style, oval hole Mandola
    Stiver A style (eagerly awaiting spring 2020 arrival)
    Weber Gallatin A Mandola "D hole"
    Kentucky KM-950
    Harley Benton A style (Spare canoe paddle)
    Rogue 100A (current campfire tool)

  2. #2
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2019
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    11

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I've rescued a number of instruments off of Goodwill that called to me. I figured I'd fix them up and flip them. Some I've restored and some are in line to be restored... but I can't bring myself to part with any of them.
    So much for that idea.

  3. The following members say thank you to Amanda Lyn for this post:


  4. #3
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    High Peak - UK
    Posts
    2,615

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Personally, I think it very dangerous to dispose of an instrument you love before you have fallen for the new one. I too am retired, on a fixed income and an RV owner. I assume, however, that my fixed income is somewhat higher than yours as I’ve never had the problem of having to sell one to fund another; which might explain why I have so many of the darned things!

  5. The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to Ray(T) For This Useful Post:


  6. #4

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I've had a Martin guitar for 25 years. Over that time I've grown to prefer mahogany over rosewood as I began to focus on singing. Three years ago I found a 65 Epiphone Texan that is just the one. A friend has lusted for it since he first played it. I'm thinking its time. I play it every two or three months.

    I have a self inflicted rule to not spend very much more than I got from selling stuff. I have a growing banjo habit and would love a bass fiddle. Something's got to give.
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  7. #5
    Registered User John Bertotti's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    SD
    Posts
    2,872

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Bill View Post
    Am I the only one that feels a deep emotional detachment when parting with a mandolin that has been for 7 years a delight to play and care for.? Perhaps like loosing a beloved pet?
    This past week I placed an order for a relatively big upgrade necessitating that I simultaneously offer for sale an instrument that I have loved playing and treated with the utmost of care. This instrument was adopted (hand picked) from a group of five sister mandolins for it's sweetness of tone and other qualities we look for in a mandolin.
    While I look forward with great anticipation to receiving my new custom build I look at my soon to be sold mandolin with melancholy. My gut says that I should have both but being retired on a fixed income and an appetite for extensive RV travel, my head tells me that is just not in the cards.
    I am sure I will lament the loss of this mandolin and always remember the joy it provided while thinking about the luck of a new owner that will surely be enjoying it as much as I did.
    For others that have felt this way let me know how long I should expect this feeling of gloom over the sale to last. Previous sales of mandolins I have owned have not had this impact.
    No idea I have never sold one!
    My avatar is of my OldWave Oval A

    Creativity is just doing something wierd and finding out others like it.

  8. #6
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    960

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I have an entry level Canadian made acoustic guitar - a factory second -which I paid around 400 bucks for new about 25 years ago . Loved the neck ...very playable with no bells and whistles . It has an intonation issue which I've simply worked around with tuning , truss rod adjustments , string gauge, fret dressings etc.. Still not right .

    BUT ..I've written over 200 songs on it . One of those songs won me a Gibson Hummingbird several years ago . Brand new Hummingbird shipped from Gibson to my door.
    It was nice , of course , but not the fantastic instrument I'd expected . ( lacked in the tone dept ).
    I sold the Hummingbird within weeks for 3000.00 and kept my old one . A friend said " What ?....you sold your lucky Hummingbird "
    I said ..." The LUCKY one was the guitar I wrote the song on " . I'll never part with that one . "

  9. The following members say thank you to roysboy for this post:


  10. #7
    Registered User Kevin Briggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    2,392
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I'll throw in a vote for not selling if at all possible. I know how it goes. I sold a beloved mandolin because I needed the money, and it helped at the time, but in the long run that phase of my life is over (still need money though, lol) and I wish I had that instrument. It even had "Made for Kevin Briggs" written on the label by Bruce Weber. It was very special.

    Try to hang on!

  11. #8
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Vancouver BC Canada
    Posts
    960

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    ....a follow-up .
    Last year I found a used Yamaha acoustic dread ......a trade-in . FG 335 model.
    It looked like hell ....scratched gloss , dirty ...bad strings etc.., but it sounded FANTASTIC . I had to keep looking at the headstock . Yup ...Yamaha . I knew they made good instruments but had never owned one . I snapped this thing up , sanded off the gloss and dropped a new saddle in it . It sounds incredible .

    Oh yeah ....it cost me 89.00 and I'd take it over than new hummingbird anytime .
    You just never know do you ...?

  12. #9
    Perpetually Confused
    Join Date
    Aug 2019
    Location
    Columbia, Md
    Posts
    23

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    When I start to think about selling any of my instruments, I will change the strings, and play it for a little while, imagining it no longer being in my harem.

    If I start to get the feeling like you are describing, I put it back in the case, and it doesn't go up for sale! That happens more often then I would like, but it is what it is... and why I have 12 guitars, 3 basses (not including my upright), 4 ukuleles, etc... :D
    ===================

    Collings F5
    Goldtone MG6 Mando Guitar
    Too many guitars to list: Mostly Martin and PRS
    European Upright Bass
    Some Uilleann Pipes

  13. #10
    Moderator MikeEdgerton's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    40.191N -74.2W
    Posts
    22,931

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I'm reminded of the words of my friend Larry Cottrell who upon hearing that I was selling a guitar to buy another one said "You mean you can sell one to buy another? That thought never crossed my mind before now." Larry had a large collection of guitars.
    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  14. The following members say thank you to MikeEdgerton for this post:


  15. #11
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    S.W. Wisconsin
    Posts
    5,149

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I have several instruments I rarely play that I am thinking of selling, haven't quite got to that point yet, but should sometime soon as they are too nice to sit around. At one time each was THE instrument for a decade or so. Then bands changed and type of instrument changed and now they sit. I will keep at least one of each, but am seriously thinking of selling a few. This doesn't help you, as you are selling one for one, but to let you know there are others out there who hang onto instruments for sentimental reasons too.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  16. #12
    coprolite mandroid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Outer Spiral Arm, of Galaxy, NW Oregon.
    Posts
    15,790

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Yea the release part of Catch and release takes some effort.. Pictutes posting and fielding replies ..
    writing about music
    is like dancing,
    about architecture

  17. #13
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,344
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    There is a 'twist' to this story in my case. And that is that I quit guitar in favor of violin about fifteen years ago. Last year I yearned for guitar again and bought a guitar. Now, I play mandola and have a couple of mandolins that keep me busy after playing fiddle. (Oh yea, I have two good ones). This guitar is probably the best guitar I've ever played, certainly the best I've ever owned. And I honestly can't play it. Can't remember chords and I get mixed up with six strings instead of four. I love the thing but really I should sell it. Lately this situation has been driving me nuts.
    Decipit exemplar vitiis imitabile

  18. #14
    Registered User grassrootphilosopher's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    1,672

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by Pittsburgh Bill View Post
    Am I the only one that feels a deep emotional detachment when parting with a mandolin that has been for 7 years a delight to play and care for.? Perhaps like loosing a beloved pet?
    To be fair up front. I have bought some instruments and sold none... Ups, I should have said "but one". And this leads me to express my opinion.

    If I felt deeply for an instrument (like my wonderful Strad-O-Lin) I would not part with it (though I mostly play my pricey F-5 style mandolin). I have bonded with the instrument beyond parting.

    I still have my first guitar, which is an okay box as a starter guitar. I don´t really play it anymore, but I still have it. I still have my first "good" guitar, my Martin D-16M wich is all that you might need in a guitar (like the Strad-O-Lin). My son plays it these days and when I play it memories of starry nights filled with music in Colorado mining towns make my heartstrings quiver. I have stepped up to another guitar that has and is another story.

    Would I sell any of these instruments?

    In another lifetime I had a beginner´s banjo (Höfner brand) that was probably okay learning on but that was sorely lacking in the tone department (as I have since learned). At the time I was in the pickle to either learn the guitar (properly) or the banjo. The banjo lost. I have since then acquired a banjo (which is a great instrument). But at that time the banjo (and that specific banjo) hadn´t forged a bond that needed breaking.

    Now we all know that somewhere down the line when the light grows dim you can´t take them with you. As I look on the Martin I am pleased that this instrument gives my son joy. At his age I didn´t even have a guitar and it took me a long, long time to play on a guitar as good as the Martin (and he has access to my really good guitar also). I would be happy if my son would take care of the Martin as I took care of it. I would not mind giving it to him (and telling him the stories the guitar has lived through and sung in). My first guitar... well, when my son was younger he dabbled on my first guitar (until he was proficient enough to step up to the Martin). There´s my daughter who may do as my son does. If not, I would not feel any qualms to pass it on to some deserving beginner. My first guitar has a sentimental value but the bond is not tight. It would probably hurt me more to see the guitar not being played at all than to give it to someone who plays it like I did when I started out.

    To me the hurt to let go of an instrument is more the insecurity of not knowing that the instrument is treated with the necessary respect. Again, would I have to let go of an instrument that has the status of my beloved pet (see OP) I would not let it go or probably even "replace" it with a different instrument.
    Olaf

  19. #15
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,912

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    After going decades accumulating instruments and never disposing of any, I've started doing some trade-ins to get truly unusual, not-many-of-a-kind instruments. This has necessitated trading in some I truly loved, and owned for 30-40 years or more:

    1. A 1957 Martin D-18, braces shaved by the late Eldon Stutzman, that sounded really good, and that I bought in the early '70's. It, along with a Guild F-212XL 12-string guitar, and a '20's Martin Style 2 ukulele, went in an even swap at Bernunzio's, for my Stahl mando-bass, Larson brothers made. I have another Martin dreadnaught, a 1970 D-41, plus the "hybrid" 00-28G/00-42 conversion that's my main gigging guitar, so I figured I didn't need three Martins. But I'd done a thousand gigs with the D-18, though it had been a "closet queen" since I got the 00-42, and I really felt a pang when I turned it over. The pang was eased a bit when John B allowed me $3K on it, about 10X what I paid for it 40 years ago.

    2. Acquiring my second Larson brothers instrument, a Stahl mandola, also involved trade-ins: an Eastman DGM-1 Giacomel clone, which I'd owned for awhile but never really played as much as the price would warrant, and a '30's Regal tiple, nice koa back and sides. Plus a few hundred buxx. No strong emotional attachments to either, though the Eastman was a very nice axe, and I hope someone else is enjoying it now.

    Long ago, I traded the Gibson 'teens A-1 I found in my late grandfather's attic, on an F-2 of similar vintage, but that was back in the days when Eldon S wouldn't sell you a Gibson mandolin unless you traded one in, and the A-1 was all I had. I've kept the other family heirloom mandolin I found, a B & J Victoria bowl-back probably make by Lyon & Healy, and still play it now and again for historical music gigs.

    Careful about getting emotionally attached to things, because things, by their very nature, come and go. My mandolins will, I presume, out-live me, and some other hands will get music out of them when I'm perhaps learning the harp.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  20. #16
    Some Ability - No Talent MikeZito's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    1,471
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    If I still had every instrument that I ever owned I would not only be bankrupt, but I would need a small warehouse to keep it all in.

    It hurts every time that I HAVE to let one go, but, honestly (in most cases) I get over it pretty quickly . . . .

  21. #17
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,677

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    We downsized (intentionally/willingly) last summer, and I lost my music storage room. I’ve been working up to selling some instruments and think I’ve reached that point. I’d like either a shorter scale Girouard GBOM (like the one that’s sale pending at TME), a mandola, or a nice smaller bodied guitar. Part of the difficulty taking that step is sentimental, because I really like all of these instruments and have some great memories with each, and 2 of the 3 are exceptional instruments, just not what I want/need at the moment. But, the real kicker for me is not wanting to deal with all the potential email and picture requests, shipping worries, etc. I think I’m going to go the consignment route and take the hit on the profits. While I’d like the money, I’m not in a situation where I need to maximize it, and think avoiding the annoyance of the selling process would be worth it to me.

    To the OP, congratulations on your new mandolin!
    Chuck

  22. #18
    Pittsburgh Bill
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by CES View Post
    We downsized (intentionally/willingly) last summer, and I lost my music storage room. I’ve been working up to selling some instruments and think I’ve reached that point. I’d like either a shorter scale Girouard GBOM (like the one that’s sale pending at TME), a mandola, or a nice smaller bodied guitar. Part of the difficulty taking that step is sentimental, because I really like all of these instruments and have some great memories with each, and 2 of the 3 are exceptional instruments, just not what I want/need at the moment. But, the real kicker for me is not wanting to deal with all the potential email and picture requests, shipping worries, etc. I think I’m going to go the consignment route and take the hit on the profits. While I’d like the money, I’m not in a situation where I need to maximize it, and think avoiding the annoyance of the selling process would be worth it to me.

    To the OP, congratulations on your new mandolin!
    Thanks
    We also down sized 3 years ago and storage is also a problem.
    My situation is that we travel extensively in our RV (about 250 days a year and 25K miles per year). That eats up a big part of our time and discretionary income.
    I have long desired a Stiver as I have never heard one that did not compare with the best of mandolins I have ever heard. Also, Louis Stiver is but an hour away from me and has done some luthier work for me. He is quite a nice fellow and MAS dictates that I have one of his mandolins.
    I'm selling my Collings MT which has that to me wonderful Collings tone and of which I have pampered since purchasing new to help fund the new Stiver. I'm just playing it less than my Kentucky KM-950 because I travel and do not want to expose my Collings to the high humidity I fight in an RV. When home, however seldom, I enjoy the Collings. I could sell the Kentucky but that would bring less money and I would still not want to expose the Collings to the rigors of RV travel. While I am going to miss the Collings I will be looking forward to time to bond with my soon to be Stiver.
    I hope to aquire some satisfaction knowing that someone else will be enjoying a very fine Collings that I have maintained in prestne condition.
    Keith Edward Coleman A style, oval hole Mandola
    Stiver A style (eagerly awaiting spring 2020 arrival)
    Weber Gallatin A Mandola "D hole"
    Kentucky KM-950
    Harley Benton A style (Spare canoe paddle)
    Rogue 100A (current campfire tool)

  23. #19
    Registered User Kevin Briggs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    State College, PA
    Posts
    2,392
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Hey, Bill:

    I hear ya'. It's definitely a tough decision. I'll provide a little push back and point out what is likely obvious and irrelevant, lol....

    If your Collings stays home because you're RV-ing so much, won't the Stiver do the same? Wouldn't it make more sense to move the Kentucky and simply commit to having and caring for the Collings on the road with you, while you keep your Stiver at home? I'm just saying... it sounds like you're moving a mandolin you love - but don't get to play a whole lot - for one you think you'll love more - but won't get to play a whole lot. I certainly understand the financial aspect of selling the more expensive instrument, and that could be a necessity. I've not only been there, I'm always there.

    Now, I'll add in another wrinkle, and this is about lifestyle, so please feel free to completely reject this point of view. I made the decision a while ago to use my best instruments as often as possible. I had one pretty high-end mandolin that I was initially afraid to take out of the house, but I had tons of gigs, and for a few of them I brought my beater Kentucky 300 (or thereabouts) instead of the nice one. For gigs! It didn't make any sense, so I vowed to play my nice instruments as much as possible. Then, I went to the Gray Fox festival for a week or so and considered not bringing my nice mandolin because it would be too rough. But then I thought about how much jamming I was going to do and what a shame it would be not to put all that time in on my best/favorite instrument. So, I brought it with me and played the heck out of it. It was hot, humid, dusty, and dirty, but the mando was fine, and I got to share it with a bunch of other musicians who really appreciated it. It seems to me you likely have some opportunities to play with others while you're on the road, and you likely have lots of time. Isn't that the perfect situation to spend a few hours a day picking your favorite mando?

    Soapbox over....

    On another note, we're practically pisan. I live in State College, and I can hear/see the impact Steve at Acoustic Music Works has had on ya'. Me too. You've got the Collings, Kentucky, Stiver trifecta Stever rolls out. :-)

  24. #20
    Pittsburgh Bill
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Kevin
    I toss the same feelings around in my mind all the time to the point that I have to stop thinking. I do like coming home to the Collings as it is a very fine instrument. But, I have to say that my 950 is also a joy to play and I worry less about it due to the smaller investment. I think I really want a Stiver for other reasons beyond the fact that they are great instruments. While I really like my Collings and think that I got one of the better Mts, I feel no connection to Bill Collings as I do to Louis Stiver. He is "in my back yard" so to speak, and I think it cool to have an instrument made by someone I know, like, and have confidence that I will not regret it. In my mind, it would be a shame to not ever own a Stiver mandolin even though advertising my Collings in the Cafe classifieds leaves me feeling somewhat sad at the thought of selling it.
    Keith Edward Coleman A style, oval hole Mandola
    Stiver A style (eagerly awaiting spring 2020 arrival)
    Weber Gallatin A Mandola "D hole"
    Kentucky KM-950
    Harley Benton A style (Spare canoe paddle)
    Rogue 100A (current campfire tool)

  25. #21
    Registered User Steve VandeWater's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    547

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Regarding owning instruments built by people you know: I know what you mean. I had a Stiver that I took in exchange for doing some concrete work. It was a great instrument and in like-new condition, but I just didn't have a strong connection to it. I traded it to someone in the Pittsburgh Mandolin Orchestra for a 1919 F4. the F4 was gorgeous and sounded great, but I never truly bonded with it either. I ended up selling it and bought Tyler White F5 #9. After I'd met Tyler and really liked him, I can't imagine ever selling it. Likewise, I own a Bill Pruitt #1 that I traded a 1915 A1 for. I know Bill from my hometown and really appreciate his work. I should get rid of one of the two, but just can't bring myself to do it.
    It ain't gotta be perfect, as long as it's perfect enough!

  26. #22
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,677

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Bill, I get where your head is at, completely, but I also agree with Kevin to a degree. My current “baby” is a Skip Kelley A5 that’s a beautiful, wonderfully playable tone monster, and Skip’s also in my back yard. Though I’ve never met him, I have a couple of other “Kevin Bacon” connections through local BG pickers that add to my love of the instrument. My second is a Silverangel Econo, and my beater is an Eastman 315. My Eastman is a good one, providing 75-80% of the tone of a Collings MT at a fraction of the price, but the SA just has a richness I prefer. I hemmed and hawed for quite a while, but finally came to the conclusion that I’d make the SA my alternate voice to the Kelley, but also my “beater.” Eastman is having a price hike in October, so I’ll get a little more than expected when I sell the Eastman, and I’ll get to enjoy continuing to play my first “real” f holed mandolin. I don’t think I could sell the SA for what it’s really worth to me anyway, and I do love it. I travel some, camp some, take it to the lake, etc, but won’t be (hopefully) using it to fight off zombies (that’s what the solid bodies are for, lol).

    As encouragement, though, the MTs hold their value well, have also recently had a price bump, and tend to sell quickly. I traded one to TMS for my mandocello, and the MT sold in less than a day, so I doubt you’ll have much of a wait...
    Chuck

  27. #23
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,052

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    Bill, I understand where you are coming from (and we are fairly close neighbors too, as I am in Alliance, OH.) I have a bit of MAS for a late 1920s/early 1930s Gibson A, but I cannot justify it without selling/trading one of my current mandolins. I am thinking of letting my Kentucky KM805 go, there is nothing wrong with it, but I have never truly "bonded" with it. But it's my only F-style mandolin. So I am still thinking..... But I have trouble letting instruments go.... and I have Collings MT also, so I understand the grief (and my Collings MT is never leaving.)

  28. #24
    Pittsburgh Bill
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    604
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I know exactly what you are saying. My saving grace is that my Kentucky 950 makes a very good alternate mandolin. I previously owned a few Eastmans and a Kentucky F style that we’re Ok alternates but never seemed to do it for me.
    Now to patiently wait for my Stiver while I lament the upcoming sale of my Collings.
    Keith Edward Coleman A style, oval hole Mandola
    Stiver A style (eagerly awaiting spring 2020 arrival)
    Weber Gallatin A Mandola "D hole"
    Kentucky KM-950
    Harley Benton A style (Spare canoe paddle)
    Rogue 100A (current campfire tool)

  29. #25
    Registered User Mandobart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    2,947

    Default Re: Parting with a beloved mandolin

    I couldn't bring myself to sell an instrument if I was already regretting the decision. I've only sold instruments when I had already replaced it with something much better and I knew I wouldn't miss the old one.

    On "the search for the tone" aspect, this recent thread on AGF got me thinking maybe some folks don't realize that it's their own gradual hearing degradation leading to dissatisfaction and constant searching/trading.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •