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Thread: Interesting video

  1. #1
    Registered User Pete Martin's Avatar
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    Default Interesting video

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  3. #2
    Orrig Onion HonketyHank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    Wow. I understood almost every word. But the sentences were ... well ... intricate. Am I allowed to be fascinated even though I didn't really get much stashed away in usable form?
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  4. #3
    Registered User John Soper's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    Unfortunately, I'll never reach level 7: my mandolin tunes itself every chord, but not in an organized way!

  5. #4
    Registered User Pete Martin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    This video explains why I don't like much Jazz 1960s and later, except Bossa Nova, which uses the chord ideas of 50s jazz.
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  6. #5

    Default Re: Interesting video

    I think the level 7 was stolen by from 50’s mandolin Jazz players who just didn’t take the time to tune their mandolins!
    Is it good to call this the mandolin “centsical” approach to jazz harmony!

  7. #6
    Registered User Tom Wright's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    I like the intervening “bumper” that is the notorious “lick”.

    I hear there is a T-shirt that says “Voice Leading > Theory”. Because we have fewer notes we can use at one time we have to mainly hear the voice leading, the line. Jazz chord voicing, whether meat-and-potatoes progressions or more exotic constructions, always has a line. When McCoy Tyner is playing his power chords there is a melodic line they follow. Even in the simplest progressions the voicing that sounds right takes the shortest path from one chord to the next.

    A fun trick is to play stacked 4ths, which can move up and down the scale, diatonically, or just in pure parallel, (jazz version of power chords). This one, 6-5-3-x (for example) with one perfect 4th and one augmented 4th, serves as multiple chords and is my go-to jazz sound. The example could be A7#9, or Eb13, or Dbmb5(maj7) or C/Db.

    An easy exercise is to walk various chords up or down the scale, diatonically. The All Blues melody that moves upward on the C7 bass could be done like this:
    3-0-0
    5-2-1
    7-3-3
    9-5-5
    7-3-3
    5-2-1
    0-3-3.

    Here’s some stacked fourths on the same melody:
    3-2-0
    5-3-1
    7-5-3
    9-7-3
    7-5-3
    5-3-1
    3-2-0


    For my money, equal temperament sounds in tune, and the just-intonation chords sound wrong in context.
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  9. #7
    Registered User Pete Martin's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    Do you mean 9-7-5 in that middle voicing of 4ths?
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  10. #8
    Registered User Tom Wright's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Martin View Post
    Do you mean 9-7-5 in that middle voicing of 4ths?
    D’oh! Yep.
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  12. #9
    Registered User Tom Wright's Avatar
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    Default Re: Interesting video

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete Martin View Post
    Do you mean 9-7-5 in that middle voicing of 4ths?
    I also screwed up the other one:

    3-0-0
    5-2-1
    7-3-3
    9-5-5
    7-3-3
    5-2-1
    0-3-3<---- This one should be 3-0-0 as above.
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  13. #10

    Default Re: Interesting video

    That was a lot of fun, thanks for that Pete!

    I studied jazz back in the day with Adolph Sandole (brother of Coltrane's teacher Dennis Sandole, who himself was a pretty out-there cat, with stuff like two-octave scales (each octave different)) – I mention this because Adolph was a very organized teacher, everything was categorized, but there was no mention of these seven levels. Has this become a new convention in jazz theory (I Googled a couple of the names of the different levels, but didn't find anything jazz-specific), or is this a postulation of the author of the video?

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