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Thread: Gaelic singing

  1. #1
    Registered User Gunnar's Avatar
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    Default Gaelic singing

    https://youtu.be/x7jW5qDexnc

    So, I just discovered this on YouTube, and found it awesome! I then watched several more, this is some of the coolest music around, note the guizouki (is that how you spell that?) The bouzouki is an instrument that I love the sound of...
    Mandolin: Kentucky KM150
    Other instruments: way too many, and yet, not nearly enough.

    "Imagine life without mandolin. Now slap yourself! Never do it again!" -Gunnar Salyer

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  3. #2
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    Default Re: Gaelic singing

    She also sings wonderful harmony in English (with Bruce Molsky); The Blackest Crow. My wife and I do this duet, but this performance is heavenly. A bit less Celtic, maybe more Appalachian, but still a beautiful Irish-Scots crossing song.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d6jh1vqNvMs

  4. #3
    Registered User Gunnar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Gaelic singing

    Yeah, I also watched that one (and a few more, some English, some Gaelic, prefer Gaelic) there's an interview here
    https://youtu.be/qczDug2BNRo
    And her singing in English again here
    https://youtu.be/TJFcbHOgXOc
    There's that zouk again, this is part of the soundtrack from the Disney movie Brave
    Mandolin: Kentucky KM150
    Other instruments: way too many, and yet, not nearly enough.

    "Imagine life without mandolin. Now slap yourself! Never do it again!" -Gunnar Salyer

  5. #4
    Registered User Ranald's Avatar
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    Default Re: Gaelic singing

    Thanks, Gunnar. She's a lovely singer. Try Mary Jane Lamond from Cape Breton for similar singing.

    Here's some traditional Gaelic singing from Cape Breton. My grandmother, born in the 1870's, took part in "milling frolics" to shrink cloth, and, in her later years, just for fun. A "frolic" is a "bee", a community work party. Milling frolics are explained in the second video. Traditionally, the new wool cloth would be soaking wet, and heavy. The milling involved pounding the cloth. The table was long with ridges for the liquid to run off. Milling or "waulking cloth" was hard work.

    I've listened to Scottish field recordings from before the folk revival, and found the singing similar to traditional Gaelic singing in Cape Breton. The sweet, trained voices that one often hears singing Cape Breton Gaelic today are a recent phenomenon. Frolics were pretty wild, with plenty of laughter, and verses made up to poke fun at those present, especially young sweethearts -- that's why there are so many bachelors and spinsters in Cape Breton. Shy people didn't stand a chance. I've participated in milling frolics, but only in Gaelic revival years (1990's, early 2000's), but have a tape of my grandmother and her peers singing.

    If the links don't work, search You Tube for: "BEG VC 7.2.2 Milling Frolic" ; and "Explanation of a Milling Frolic".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0P-SzSKlaZw




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8rDRuuYMe8

    Last edited by Ranald; Aug-02-2019 at 4:34pm. Reason: program kept posting wrong video
    Robert Johnson's mother, describing blues musicians:
    "I never did have no trouble with him until he got big enough to be round with bigger boys and off from home. Then he used to follow all these harp blowers, mandoleen (sic) and guitar players."
    Lomax, Alan, The Land where The Blues Began, NY: Pantheon, 1993, p.14.

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    Gunnar 

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