Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

  1. #1
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    79

    Default THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    About a year and a half ago I bought my first mandolin--an Eastman MD-505 sunburst--from the Denver Folklore Center. I loved the sound and appearance of the instrument, and it was a pleasure to start learning how to play it. But I had this constant frustration when picking or chopping on the G course. I had so much difficulty getting a clear tone without a buzz. And I frequently pushed the outer string right off the edge of the frets. I assumed it was just my poor beginner technique, but (long story short) it turned out that the buzzing was due to the outer G string being too close to the edge of the frets/fingerboard because the tailpiece was misaligned. It was subtle to my untrained eye--a local luthier pointed it out to me. I called Denver Folklore Center to tell them about the issue. They had me send some pictures, and after consulting with their Eastman rep, they and the rep agreed that this was covered by the Eastman warranty and that they would replace the mandolin! Yesterday they received their shipment of new mandolins from Eastman, and I went down to the shop and picked out a replacement, a really beautiful instrument. I chose a non-sunburst style, which I like even better than the sunburst models. Another surprise is that the one I selected has wide frets instead of the very narrow gauge frets that the older instrument had. When I brought it home to play, I discovered that I can use a lighter touch with the wider frets, and for the first time I can easily do clear-ringing triplet slides! Mark, from Denver Folklore Center, was totally patient, friendly, and accommodating to me as I checked out three different instruments, and carefully transferred all the "accoutrements" (strap, grommets, armrest, leather string-damping strip) from my old instrument to the new one. While the new mando is very nicely set up, with perfect intonation all the way up the neck, Mark told me to bring it back in in a few months after it's had time to settle, and he'll check it out and give it a thorough setup. I'm so happy with my new mandolin–I can play the G strings cleanly now!–and want to give Brian and Mark at Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins a huge thank you for being so great and standing behind their products. If you're in the area, Denver Folklore Center is THE place to go for all acoustic stringed instruments, books, and supplies.

  2. #2

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Now that's an awesome outcome. Bravo. Thanks for sharing
    Scott R.
    -
    2017 Pava A5 Pro - Autumn Burst
    1987 Flatiron F5 Artist
    Ellis F5 #464 - Just got here.

    Want to list your instruments with galleries in your signature?
    Check out RuttList Instrument Archive to create your own galleries for free.

  3. #3
    Registered User stringsattached's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    London,Ont Canada
    Posts
    38

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Great customer service from both Eastman and Folklore.
    ==================
    Ken

    Eastman Fan

  4. #4
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,806

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Spent a lot of time hanging out at Denver Folklore Center 1965-67, while stationed at Ft. Carson in Colorado Springs. Founder Harry Tuft was running it at the time, and I bought my first decent banjo (Ode/Muse Style 2) and guitar (Gibson J-50) there with my army pay. Played my first open mic night, Victory Rag on an OS Appalachian Autoharp also purchased there. Met some great people -- Harry himself, Mary Stribling, Jan Alexander, "Toad" Hanna, the late Dave Ferretta, etc.

    An important nexus for folk and acoustic music, and still central 50 years later. Hope it keeps going many more years.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  5. #5
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2017
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    79

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    I met Mr. Tufts last summer at the Rocky Mountain Old-time Music Festival. A delightful man.

  6. #6
    Front Porch & Sweet Tea NursingDaBlues's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    My heart is in The South.
    Posts
    413

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Harry Tuft is truly one of a kind. He’s just a terrific individual who personally knows just about all the major folk and Americana players, both past and present. He’s in the Colorado Music Hall of Fame. He hasn’t slowed his statewide/nationwide performance schedule even at the age of eighty-something. And, yet, Harry continues to extend friendship to everyone he meets. He’s humble. He’s caring. And he’s real.

    It’s not everyone who can call up Judy Collins to lend her vocals on one of his CDs. Or have a former Colorado Governor sit with him on stage to do a reading as part of a performance. It’s not unusual to see him just passing the time of day with Taj Mahal or John Oates or Arlo Guthrie. And if Harry is in the audience, artists from Tom Paxton to John McEuen will invite him onstage to do a song with them.

    Most folks who know of Harry associate him with the Denver Folklore Center. But DFC was just a small part of his life. Harry is a nurturer. He hired Tim O’Brien and Charles Sawtelle to work in the store and helped them get their footing as they developed into Hot Rize. He has helped numerous regionally- and nationally-recognized artists further their careers – artists like Mollie O’Brien, Chris Daniels, the late Spencer Bohren, and countless others. Harry’s nurturing ways prompted his origination of Swallowhill Music which is now the second largest acoustic music school in the nation. It’s this desire to nurture that has always occupied Harry’s time and energy.

    Harry’s time at DFC is legendary. Major artists would come from around the world to simply meet with him. The signatures and messages in his guest book read like a who’s who of music, with names ranging from Paul Kantner and Frank Zappa to Rev. Gary Davis and Hedy West. The respect given Harry is impressive.

    Harry is no longer associated with the Denver Folklore Center. He sold it a few years back so he could focus on other pursuits that interest him. Like performing a bit more. And just a couple of weeks ago, he mentioned to me that “a coffeehouse might be fun.”

    I am truly blessed to have Harry as a friend. If any of you have the opportunity to see him, please do so. And don’t be shy about meeting him. You might find that you will have made a new friend.

  7. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to NursingDaBlues For This Useful Post:


  8. #7
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    3,602

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Thanks for posting! While I think any of the cafe sponsors with which I’ve dealt would offer you similar satisfaction, I always appreciate it when people do the right thing. I hope you thoroughly enjoy your new mandolin, and I hope the old one gets repaired and is sold at a heavy discount to someone who never thought they’d be able to afford that much mandolin...
    Chuck

  9. #8
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Rochester NY 14610
    Posts
    15,806

    Default Re: THANKS! to Denver Folklore Center and Eastman Mandolins

    Harry stayed at our apartment back in the '70's when he played a Rochester gig for Golden Link Folk Singing Soc. A great guy, deserving of the praise in Post #6.

    Plus, he owns Mississippi John Hurt's Guild guitar. And he says he's never restrung it.
    Allen Hopkins
    Gibsn: '54 F5 3pt F2 A-N Custm K1 m'cello
    Natl Triolian Dobro mando
    Victoria b-back Merrill alumnm b-back
    H-O mandolinetto
    Stradolin Vega banjolin
    Sobell'dola Washburn b-back'dola
    Eastmn: 615'dola 805 m'cello
    Flatiron 3K OM

  10. The following members say thank you to allenhopkins for this post:


Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •