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Thread: Tab of Fifths

  1. #1

    Default Tab of Fifths

    For tab enthusiasts... I'm always looking for patterns for summarizing things and was trying to visualize the mandolin symmetry and the Circle of Fifths when you shift the scale patterns up or down a string and add a new line pattern to change keys. I came up with this:

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    It seems helpful for remembering how to shift the open scale over a I IV V chord pattern quickly and the relationship of the strings to the classic COF - shift it up for the fourth and down for the fifth.

    I've not seen anything like this but maybe I'm reinventing the wheel. Maybe it will be helpful to someone else.

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  3. #2

    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    Took me a while to figure the diagram out, but thanks, it’s cool to have a slightly different way of looking at this. I usually think of it from the root notes first and expand the patterns afterwards, whereas here is seems all connected as a large pattern.

  4. #3

    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    Maybe this is a more useful way to view it on the key of G:

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    circle of fifths is definitely a helpful thing...circle of fifths/clockwise...circle/cycle of fourths counter clockwise

  7. #5

    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    Quote Originally Posted by CBFrench View Post
    circle of fifths is definitely a helpful thing...circle of fifths/clockwise...circle/cycle of fourths counter clockwise
    Both directions are fourths AND fifths. C to G is up a fifth and down a fourth. G to C is up a fourth, down a fifth.

  8. #6
    Registered User mmuussiiccaall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    This is how I see that in intervals with what I call the phone number 736-2514 or 415-2637.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 12 String Theory 5ths.pdf  

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  10. #7

    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    Thanks mmuussiiccaall
    I adjusted the proportioning on your diagram to see the frets further up the neck (hope that’s ok).

    To begin with, I like to make sense of the fretboard by looking for the 1 (or 8 you can call it).

    Then the box 3,4 and 7,8.

    Then I look across the neck and can see that the boxes have reoccurring patterns too, at fifth fret then in the middle then attached to the open fret.

    Each box has a 5 attached in the same position.

    This bar 4,1,5 is probably next in importance for me. Then the freeway zig zag line of all the 1’s 4’s and 5’s.

    Finally (for me so far) is the position of the major third from the 1,8 on the strings above and below, and the position of the 5’s of the 1,8.
    IMPORTANT: these positions of the MAJOR DOUBLESTOPS are always the same as you drive up the freeway of 4,1,5,4,1,5

    Major arpeggios up or better down the freeway, which again all have the same shape, are next...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by atsunrise; Jul-15-2019 at 1:27am.

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  12. #8
    Registered User mmuussiiccaall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Tab of Fifths

    When I began playing 60 years ago I found finger patterns that seemed to magically blend in to the songs I was playing. I had no idea why they worked, I just used them. Eventually when I later began teaching music my students would ask why they should put their fingers in those shapes and that's when my musical theory journey began. Now when I start a new song I know the key, mode, chord progression and accidentals. Armed with this information the 12 possible intervals in an octave can be punched in to create tension and resolution that keeps making of music interesting for a lifetime.

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