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Thread: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

  1. #1

    Default Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    Hello there everybody from Milan Italy , how can anyone bring down humidity from 67% to 55%
    In a cupboard where guitars and mandolins are stored?
    The problem is particularly felt on a 0018 Martin which in a couple of years has dangerously swelled luckily not in an irreversible way.

    Cheers

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    I am careful and try to keep the humidity to 65%, but if you live in a humid area like I do, unless you play in your controlled environment only, it will get exposed to high levels anyway. Tonight I play a boat cruise, humidity will be 70-85% depending on time of the evening. There is nothing I can do. I run a dehumidifier at home, but don't try to get less than 65% because it is pointless for me. It also allows less change when I gig or leave home.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    Air conditioning or dehumidifier. Downside to dehumidifier is that it needs to be emptied of the water it collects, also it heats the area it is located in.

    There are dessicants one can use but they need to be in a reasonably sealed area or sealed case, and it's hard to control - too dry is as bad as too damp.

    Move to a higher, drier altitude?

  4. #4

    Default Re: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    Thanks but unfortunately I can't , at the moment i ve got a temperature of 82f and 57 % of humidity in the storage which is more or less in line with what the manufacturer requires to a secure storage , but when the top is swelling is it useful to detuning the guitar when not in use in order for it to get back to its usual shape?

    Cheers

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    Ruling out air conditioning, dehumidifier, and relocation, your choices are rapidly diminishing.

    If you have or can obtain a reasonably priced, reasonably airtight case, you could try keeping your guitar in it. A bag of rice - uncooked, of course - in the case could absorb some moisture. Of course the bag would have to allow the air in the case to contact the rice. Dessicant packs are available, usually something like calcium chloride which will absorb water vapor; but they have to be dried out in an oven once they've absorbed as much as they can. Again, monitoring humidity levels in the case is important to avoid over-drying.

    Sudden extreme changes in humidity are more destructive of instruments than gradual change. Providing an environment that is stable with regard to temperature and humidity is the best solution. Many people have a room dedicated to musical instruments, which they take steps to keep reasonably cool and dry. Window air conditioning is a useful option.

    There's a lot of water in a closet at 82 degrees, but if your whole living space is at the same temp and humidity, you and your guitar may have to just live with it, the best you can.

    By way of reference, my house is centrally air conditioned, has an internal temperature of 75 degrees and relative humidity around 42%. Outside it's about 85 degrees, and 70% humidity. Sometimes in summer the humidity rises (inside the house) to 50%.

    In winter the temp inside is kept around 70-72, and I run a humidifier to keep the relative humidity between 35% and 40%. It usually remains around 40% except when it is below freezing outside. Without the humidifier, humidity could easily drop to 25%, which would be destructive to the instruments.

    Again, it's simpler to control environmental factors in a sealed case than in a whole house. One of my guitars came in a woolen bag within its case; violin cases usually have a pad and lining of silk, which acts to buffer changes in humidity in the case. The silk will absorb some excess humidity, or release it, depending on external conditions.

    How long have you had the Martin guitar? It may need to gradually accommodate itself to your environment.

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  7. #6
    Registered User Joey Anchors's Avatar
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    Default Re: Bring down humidity in the guitars storage

    This-^^
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