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Thread: Mandolin Influences

  1. #51
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Quote Originally Posted by Rickker View Post
    And also John Baldry's tabs and news mailings from the UK.
    +1 to Baldry's tabs. Niles H. featured John's notations in his rag. Wonderful things - Little Sadie, Arkansas Traveller, Dinah, exercises, patterns - all of it in a hip and easy-to-read way.

    I dropped them all to computer for easy access.

  2. #52

    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Well my major influence to mandolin has been the great late Ed King of lynyrd skynyrd , his way of playing hillibilly blues is superb , Gosh how on earth such a musician is no longer with us ?

    Rip. Ed and thanks for your art

  3. #53
    Oval holes are cool David Lewis's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanN View Post
    +1 to Baldry's tabs. Niles H. featured John's notations in his rag. Wonderful things - Little Sadie, Arkansas Traveller, Dinah, exercises, patterns - all of it in a hip and easy-to-read way.

    I dropped them all to computer for easy access.
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  4. #54
    Orrig Onion HonketyHank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    I have a confession to make: Although I had heard Bill Monroe's recordings from time to time on the radio, I never cared for his voice. And I never thought the mandolin was any part of anything.

    Then I heard Dean Webb on the Dillards, Live! LP. Specifically, it was the "Liberty" cut. I said to myself, Wow, now THAT is some part of something! Even though I was an old timey banjo wannabee at the time, I marvelled at the sound and eventually took up the mandolin. Liberty was one of my first tunes.

    ps: I did come around on Bill Monroe, too. But it was an "acquired taste".
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  5. #55
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Being a NY suburbs kid in the '60s and early '70s, I never heard a mandolin -- except perhaps when Dean Webb of the Dillards appeared on "The Andy Griffith Show" as one of the Darling brothers. But my "aha" moment came in maybe 1972 when I was listening to listener-sponsored WBAI in NYC and happened on a blazing instrumental where a high-pitched stringed instrument with a ringing tone played something bluesy with a rhythm that really rocked... turned out to be Bill Monroe playing Bluegrass Stomp. Didn't even know it was a mandolin until later. But that distinctive sound stayed with me and even today still keeps me striving to reproduce something even close to it.

  6. #56
    Spencer Sorenson Spencer's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Saw Homer and Jethro in the 50's but the mandolin didn't register. After 3 years of piano lessons, 6 years in the church choir and several years with a bit of finger picking and flat picking on a guitar, I found an old fiddle in the attic and wanted to learn that. In the mean time I had picked up Bluegrass Instrumentals, and was most taken by the fiddle, the mandolin (heresy here) didn't really register with me. While struggling with the fiddle, I played guitar and sang in a bluegrass band. One day the mandolin player was taking a break and I picked up his mandolin, all at once the stuff I had struggled so hard with on the fiddle, and been so unsuccessful with, worked. Shortly after, I also heard Nate Bray on 419 W. Main, which had just come out, and boy did it register! He was gone by then, but I got to play with his brothers quite a bit, and to hear a lot of his work from a private collection. Huge inspiration. No turning back, that was almost 50 years ago and I still keep at it, lucky to be able to.

    Spencer

  7. #57
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Daniel View Post
    There were also a lot of great local bands -- the Katie Lauer Band was a great area group and they had one of the hottest mandolin players anywhere named Jeff Terflinger. Sadly, Jeff died of AIDS out in California in the 1980s but he was as good as they come.
    Hey Bernie, I appreciate your admiration of Jeff -- but please be careful before pronouncing people dead (and of AIDS, no less!).
    I played in a little band with Jeff in the summer of 1983, and he was fit as a fiddle back then. But your post made me very sad and worried, so I just googled to check ... and he sure looks pretty healthy on his website, which is dated 2018: http://www.jeffterflinger.com/about.html

  8. #58
    Registered User Jon Hall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    In November, 1970 I saw Robin Williamson, of the Incredible String Band, and Levon Helm, The Band, perform. I've been in love with the little 8-stringer ever since!

  9. #59
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Besides seeing Peter Ostroushko playing around the Twin Cities, also was heavily influenced in person by Bob Douglas, Chirps Smith, Ralph Tuttila and the instructors at the Bluff Country Gathering down in Lanesboro, MN. And recordings by Norman and Nancy Blake, Heikki Lahti, Jethro Burns, Dawg and all the folks who have played in Fairport Convention.

    There are others, but those mentioned above are probably the biggest influences.
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  10. #60
    Jeff Terflinger
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    Default @ Bernie Daniel. It's me Jeff Terflinger, alive in Oakland.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bernie Daniel View Post
    I didn’t even touch a stringed instrument until I was about 28 or so. Got drafted out of my Ph.D program at Ohio State in 1970 and to have something else to think about in the Army I bought a guitar and a Mel Bay chord book. I bought a classical nylon string guitar – did not even know that for folk you need a steel strings. The day I was getting discharged in '72 I met a kid on at the PX who was just getting ready to ship out to Vietnam and he wanted to get sell his ’60 Hummingbird so I bought it from him -- loaded the guitar into in my 67 BMW 1800 and headed for Ohio. I have always wondered if he made it back OK. When I got back to OSU in ’72 to resume my biochem program the area around Columbus was hot with local bluegrass bands. They mostly played in small bars around the city – those were great places to hear bluegrass and also a good place to get your lights punched out if you said the wrong thing or wore out your welcome some how. But I was blown away with mandolin breaks and had soon bought a Japanese Aria to bang around on – in about 6 months I got rid of it for a ’63 Gibson A-40. By the summer of '72 I was learning about F-5s and that the “old ones” were the best. From there it was the usual 70s thing LPs and BG festivals – saw Bill Monroe at the Frontier Ranch east of Columbus and started collecting bluegrass LPs – I liked most of the big BG bands but the Sam Bush and his buddies in the Newgrass Revival were particularly exciting to me. There were also a lot of great local bands -- the Katie Lauer Band was a great area group and they had one of the hottest mandolin players anywhere named Jeff Terflinger. Sadly, Jeff died of AIDS out in California in the 1980s but he was as good as they come. Probably the LP that had the biggest influence on me was 419 West Main Street by Red Cravens and the Bray Brothers. But I was really more into Old Time as there was a group of grad students who had weekly old time jams that I joined. So while I liked bluegrass the next mandolin I bought was a ’19 F-2 for playing Old Time and Celtic. To this day I spend much more time playing those two kinds of music than BG. I probably did not learn a true bluegrass tune like Jerusalem Ridge or Tallahassee on the mandolin until the mid-80s.
    Hi Bernie,
    Thank you for the kind words of appreciation, even in death. I don't know how these rumors get started. Probably wishful thinking from Homophobes from around Cincinnati. Oh wait,,, that's why I moved to California, to escape from them.
    The only part of me that died was my youth. I am playing fiddle now, a bench made 1943 J. R. Carlisle. At 65 years, my love for music remains undiminished and I play 3 hours a day. I now have different heroes. Django Reinhardt, Stephan Grappelli, Hilary Hahn and the music of Bach.

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  12. #61
    Jeff Terflinger
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Since I got THAT off my chest I'll comment on the thread. I started playing mandolin at around age of 14. There were not an abundance of players to hear back then, this would have been around 1966. My favorite players were Bill Monroe, John Duffey, Bob Osborne and Jesse McReynolds. I bought an album of fiddle tunes, I believe it was Wade Ray? Sonny Osborne played banjo on it
    and Jethro Burns played mandolin! At that point he became my favorite inspiration.

  13. #62

    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    I took up mandolin because my Dad played as an Applachian kid in the teens and 20s and as I approached retiring I decided to take it up. Never thought about it when I started guitar playing in my teens. Never heard him play as we never had a mandolin.

    Since starting to play, its been Jethro, Adam Steffey, Evan Marshall and Don Stiernberg as my inspirational heroes.
    Play it like you mean it.

  14. #63
    not a donut Kevin Winn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    I've mentioned this in a couple other threads, but the responsibility for my picking up the mandolin lies squarely at the feet of Andrew Marlin, with help from Will Kimble.

    Fortunately, I've had the opportunity to let them both know about that, which they have seemingly accepted with characteristic grace...

  15. #64
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    Default Re: @ Bernie Daniel. It's me Jeff Terflinger, alive in Oakland.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Terflinger View Post
    Hi Bernie,
    Thank you for the kind words of appreciation, even in death. I don't know how these rumors get started. Probably wishful thinking from Homophobes from around Cincinnati. Oh wait,,, that's why I moved to California, to escape from them.
    The only part of me that died was my youth. I am playing fiddle now, a bench made 1943 J. R. Carlisle. At 65 years, my love for music remains undiminished and I play 3 hours a day. I now have different heroes. Django Reinhardt, Stephan Grappelli, Hilary Hahn and the music of Bach.
    In my best Monte Python voice "So you're not dead then?"

    This is a first.

    "Bargain instruments are no bargains if you can't play them". These are the words of J. Garber.

  16. #65

    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    Christian Johnson of Mission Mountain Wood Band got me interested in the mandolin when I first saw them at the U of Montana.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Missio...tain_Wood_Band

    I went down to a music store and bought a $60 mandolin (1976). Picked up a mandolin how-to book and started learning about Sam Bush, David Grisman, and other mandolinists. Newgrass Revival's Fly Through the Country album cemented my choice.

    Moved to Alaska where I discovered Joe Page of Tanana Grass, the premier bluegrass band in the state at that time.

    And it was The David Grisman Quintet's 1977 album that took me away from bluegrass. Now my heroes are Fats Waller, Duke Ellington, Hoagy Carmichael, Django, and Stephane Grappelli, but I still enjoy listening to bands that have taken bluegrass into interesting directions.

  17. #66

    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    I am an old coot and my first memory of a mandolin was hearing J B Hammitte playing with his brothers in church. That was about 65 years ago. When I heard Monroe play, I was hooked. I tried to play like that. All of his gospel albums that I still have. Next big influence was when a friend suggested the "Appalachian Swing" album. Then Hershel Sizemore, Dempsey Young, Mike Compton. When I play, I hear the melody and play off of that. I cannot play the scale , chord progression style that seems so popular today.

  18. #67

    Default Re: Mandolin Influences

    1) I likely would have never even heard the mandolin if it wasn't for Bill Monroe, so I'd have to put him at the top of the list.

    2) Clarence White. Seriously. In my book, CW was the best flatpicker ever. In my efforts to keep improving my flatpicking, I was always looking for direction, instruction, and new inspiration. What I found was a trend. I saw that a whole bunch of great flatpickers (and good local ones) also played the mandolin, banjo, or fiddle as well as the guitar, even if they only played the other instrument casually. When I saw that CW also played a bit of mandolin, it pushed me over the edge and I traded a guitar for a mandolin within a week. Frankly, it was one of the best musical decisions I ever made.

    3) Chris Thile, Mike Marshall, Sierra Hull. They've all been featured in videos giving instruction on the fundamentals. I've taken their suggestions to heart and benefitted from them.

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