Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

  1. #1

    Default Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    I finally started stringing my mandolin today. Th bridge is kind of tilting toward the peghead end of the mandolin. I assume this means the back end angle of the strings is too low? Or maybe I need to adjust the notches in the bridge to angle down toward the tailpiece more? Any thoughts? I don't have any pics at the moment. Sorry.

  2. #2
    Registered User Rodney Riley's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Effingham IL
    Posts
    1,273

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    Don't need to change the notches. Just leave the strings a little loose and stand the bridge up. Then retighten.

  3. #3
    Struggle Monkey B381's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    301

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    As stated above and start with the middle courses, bring up to tension slowly. My km150 tries to do this, just have to watch the bridge and do it as stated.
    "It doesn't matter how much you invest in your instrument until you invest in you and your ability..."

    Kentucky KM-150
    Eastman MD-404
    Morgan Monroe MFM-300
    Rover RM-75

  4. #4
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    12,038

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    Quote Originally Posted by Rodney Riley View Post
    Don't need to change the notches. Just leave the strings a little loose and stand the bridge up. Then retighten.
    Don't even need to do that.

    With strings at full tension, Steve Gilchrist burped my Gilchrist. I darn near died.

  5. The following members say thank you to AlanN for this post:


  6. #5
    mandolin slinger Steve Ostrander's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Capitol of MI
    Posts
    2,686

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    Its the pressure of the angled strings behind the bridge that tries to push the bridge forward. Its easy to fix as noted above. Just don't slack the strings so much that the bridge moves or it will throw the intonation off. Use a small piece of painters tape to mark the bridge foot.
    Never say "bouzouki" to a TSA agent...

  7. #6
    Registered User Mandobart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    2,891

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    Couple things - I always lube the nut and bridge slots with nut sauce or at least graphite. I use a jig to fit the bridge feet to the top. In the case of my 10 string Hardanger viola the height of the bridge and string tension kept flopping the bridge flat, so I biased the feet with about a 2 - 5 degree lean toward the tailpiece. Bring string tension up incrementally and evenly, with periodic adjustments to straighten the bridge.

  8. The following members say thank you to Mandobart for this post:

    Levi S 

  9. #7

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    I always push the the bridge back under full tension. Not a big deal. If you loosen the strings and move it, it will just get pulled over again as you tighten back to pitch.
    Index fingers brace from behind (foot and saddle). Thumbs push the saddle rearward. I don't just push, I am actually gripping the bridge tight so it won't shoot out.

    Get it straight, then check intonation and adjust as needed. Usually takes a few small moves to get it right.
    Robert Fear
    http://www.folkmusician.com
    1-800-493-4922

    "Education is when you read the fine print; experience is what you get when you don't.
    " - Pete Seeger

  10. #8
    Adrian Minarovic
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Banska Bystrica, Slovakia, Europe
    Posts
    2,431

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    I do it under full tension as well but I admit you need strong fingers (I've been known for adjustng string height under full tension with my fingers) and some experience to know where to hold and how hard to pull or you can flip the bridge and leave ugly scars on top. Also don't try to shift the base or you may leave scratches on finish (especially softer varnishes), though on bulletproof finishes of lower end instruments you are likely safe.
    For less experienced guys I would recommend loosening one string of each pair (just few steps) and then manipulate the bridge. The other strings will hold the bridge in place while the rest is being tuned up again.
    Adrian

  11. #9
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    S.W. Wisconsin
    Posts
    4,916

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    Like HoGo and Robert, I burp under full tension. Seems there was a thread here somewhere where the Dawg was playing a mandolin somewhere and burped the bridge under tension. It's not a rare thing.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  12. #10
    Registered User
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    4,068

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    What type bridge is it? Is the lean mostly the saddle or the entire bridge? There are many imported bridges with extra wide saddles and very sloppy adjusting thumbwheels. These bridges really like to lean because the E strings are very far forward and the wheels tilt because they don't have a good solid connection to the posts.
    I have a couple of them here. They measure 5/16" thick compared to 1/8" on a Cumberland Acoustic. It's a trifecta of this width with the very poorly threaded wheels and the post holes being too big. All these specs are very tight on a CA.
    Last edited by Jim Hilburn; Jun-17-2019 at 10:50am.

  13. #11

    Default Re: Bridge "leaning" toward peghead

    This happens all the time with violins, and is pretty easy to adjust on the fly.
    Of course with a fretless instrument intonation isn’t as critical since you’re always creating your own notes.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •