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Thread: Mandolin classical literature

  1. #26
    Registered User Carl23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Quote Originally Posted by Beanzy View Post

    here’s a slightly bonkers one I like from Tesio;

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    This website is worth a rummage too. http://www.lisciomuseum.com/2016/03/06/il-progetto/
    I can't help but notice that this music is "Property of Anthony ?? ftergiotis??, Manchester, NH"

    I live about 1 hour from Manchester. Anyone know who this is?

    C
    "The Loar" LM-520
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    and toys... lots and lots of toys.

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  2. #27
    Pataphysician Joe Bartl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Administrator,

    Perhaps you are thinking of Mandolin music in America : 3800 pieces for mandolin and where to find them compiled by Joshua Bell and published by Plucked String, Arlington, Va, c1993. You can see the Library of Congress record for this at https://lccn.loc.gov/93248350

    You can find out what libraries have a copy by going to this link: https://www.worldcat.org/title/mando...=brief_results

    Joe Bartl

  3. #28
    Pataphysician Joe Bartl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    I should mention that I am a retired Library of Congress music cataloger. Now I go into LC once a week as a volunteer to catalog mandolin music that has languished uncataloged in the stacks for well over a century. Thus far I've added over 2,000 mandolin scores to the LC music catalog. I've gone through the solo mando music and am now into duets, beginning with mandolin and piano (I'm about halfway through this). What I should do is to write a post on the best ways to search the LC online catalog ... and perhaps talk about what I've found in the course of this hobby. That will have to wait for another day.

    Joe Bartl

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  5. #29
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Let me know when you and the LC are ready for mandocello solo literature. It's not a long list, but it does exist.

  6. #30
    Registered User Martin Jonas's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Imhoff View Post
    Let me know when you and the LC are ready for mandocello solo literature. It's not a long list, but it does exist.
    Jim:

    To keep your quest for original mandocello material alive, there is exactly one piece in the Nakano index marked with "mandocello": a serenade by Stellario Cambria for a trio of mandolin, mandola and mandocello (sorry, not solo). Somewhat unusually for the period, the mandola and mandocello parts are not written in universal notation but in alto and bass clefs, presumably because it's a professional level piece not aimed at the amateur market. I attach the score. It's published in 1914, and public domain worldwide. More about the composer in this old thread: Link

    There are lots more pieces with mandocello parts within orchestral or chamber arrangements, but not mentioned in the index and therefore needing individual review.

    Martin

    Edit: I've just noticed that the same piece is also available in much better scan quality from Neil Gladd's website here:

    http://www.neilgladd.com/CambriaTrioS.pdf
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Cambria-S-MC2-20.pdf  

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  8. #31
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    "To keep your quest for original mandocello material alive, there is exactly one piece in the Nakano index marked with "mandocello": a serenade by Stellario Cambria for a trio of mandolin, mandola and mandocello (sorry, not solo). Somewhat unusually for the period, the mandola and mandocello parts are not written in universal notation but in alto and bass clefs, presumably because it's a professional level piece not aimed at the amateur market. I attach the score. It's published in 1914, and public domain worldwide."

    The full story, albeit in brief, is as follows. This particular piece was written by Cambria for the "Plectrio" in which he played mandolin at the time; it appears to have been premiered in September 1914 at a kind of house concert ("The Serenaders") featuring various professional and up-and-coming amateurs that occurred in various cities on a monthly basis; this particular concert was in NY, where the Plectrio was based.. The Plectrio was active in the 1910s; the other members varied but among them were Myron Bickford and F. Landry Berthoud. Berthoud (as did Bickford) also played viola professionally. Berthoud played the mandola in C for the group, Bickford played the mandocello. Contrary to received wisdom (i.e. Paul Sparks), "universal" notation was not, in fact, universal at the time; there were some amateur players (and a few professionals, like Berthoud and colleagues) who used alto and bass clef as needed, generally because the repertoire drew from the literature for string trio, quartet, or string orchestra.

    Advertisements for Cambria's trio appeared regularly in the Crescendo and were clearly aimed at a broad market (evident from the first advertisement in the Crescendo in July 1914 -- "a very pretty number, not difficult but extremely effective for the three instruments"). "Classical" quartets -- M1, M2, mandola in C, and mandocello -- briefly became popular in the US ca. 1910, especially on the East Coast (Providence, especially, due to the influence of William Place Jr), and there are several examples of quartets who played Mozart, etc. and from the original string parts. But the Plectrio, as did Place, recognized the need to develop an original repertoire -- hence, Cambria's piece. Bickford also wrote an original trio for the group, a portion of which is excerpted in his mandocello method (but not in bass clef, rather in universal clef, as it was published); so did Demtrius Dounis (apparently not published, at least I cannot find it). Place wrote an original quartet for classical quartet that was also published by Gibson (not in the Nakano Archive). Berthoud, Bickford, Cambria, and Place were entirely comfortable reading whatever in whatever clef. Bottom line: less to do with amateur/pro than with repertoire.

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  10. #32
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Bartl View Post
    Administrator,

    Perhaps you are thinking of Mandolin music in America : 3800 pieces for mandolin and where to find them compiled by Joshua Bell and published by Plucked String, Arlington, Va, c1993. You can see the Library of Congress record for this at https://lccn.loc.gov/93248350

    You can find out what libraries have a copy by going to this link: https://www.worldcat.org/title/mando...=brief_results

    Joe Bartl
    I can't imagine anything else coming close to that title so that certainly must be it. Can't ever recall it ever being mentioned on this forum but I now see it was at least referenced in one of the historical databases I created long ago, here.

  11. #33
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    I will attach a sample PDF of the front matter and the last page of Joshua Bell's book here. It took me forever to find it. It was tucked away in a folder that also includes my copy of Paul Sparks' excellent An Introduction to the Eighteenth Century Repertoire of the Neapolitan Mandoline (Plucked String PSB005).

    I'm sure that I bought my copy of Mandolin Music in America directly from Norman at a CMSA back in the 1990s. I remember contacting Josh directly a few years later as I was exploring some ideas for a sabbatical project asking him about the database purchase option. I believe that he said that the database had become a victim of the digital preservation crisis and that either the format or the database itself was obsolete and unrecoverable. I may have that wrong but maybe Josh will weigh in here for clarity.

    I also find it very exciting that Joe Bartl is working on the Library of Congress backlog of mandolin music. As a retired academic librarian/cataloger I can attest that catalogers at the Library of Congress are respected as representing the cream of the crop. What Joe is doing will serve researchers for generations to come.

    This a good moment to once again sing the praises of Norman Levine. His love for the mandolin made so many wonderful things possible. It's a real shame that the Plucked String publications have, for all practical purposes, disappeared. Thankfully Neil Gladd (who so often worked hand in hand with Norman and deserves to have his own praises sung more often) is reprinting some of his work from that period.

    I know that I'm confused about the current ownership and status of the Plucked String copyrights (including the rights to my own book Blueberries to Boston). It would be great, for instance, if the Mandolin Quarterly issues could be digitized and shared, legally of course.

    Anyway, here's a piece of the book currently under discussion:
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails PSB004sample.pdf  

  12. #34
    Registered User Carl23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Where to find it...

    https://www.worldcat.org/title/mando...=brief_results

    In libraries world wide! (OK, US, Switzerland and Germany)

    I've already requested in through Inter-Library Loan

    Carl
    "The Loar" LM-520
    Ludwig & Ludwig 8-370X Marimba
    Slingerland Modified Drumset
    Hand made profesional djembes from Guinea and Maili West Africa
    and toys... lots and lots of toys.

    Hey... I have a blog here!
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/blogs/53556
    Feel free to stop on by and let me know what you think!

  13. #35
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Carl, it's true that when I said "for all practical purposes" in my earlier message I wasn't thinking of interlibrary loan. But it's also true that OCLC/Worldcat only shows 19 holdings worldwide for this small book. I would love to be able to see Norman's sales records but I suspect that he sold fewer than 100 of these books in his lifetime.

    My "for all practical purposes" comment was really related to my lament concerning the disappearance of Norman's publishing work from the marketplace. I imagine that diligent searching and luck might uncover a few used copies for sale.

    (Again, many thanks to Neil Gladd for resurrecting some of his contributions to the Plucked String bibliography. Little did Norman or Neil know that when they published PSE002, Three Divertimenti ..., they would be leading me to the world of James Oswald and giving me inspiration for decades of pleasure and new tunes.)

    (I should mention too that Norman also published items under the NL Productions imprint, my long lost book included. My recollection is that Norman told me that he used NL Productions for ASCAP registered works.)

    My real hope is that the owner of the copyrights for these works will either offer the remaining stock (if they haven't already been pulped) for sale again or will release them into the public domain for others to share and/or re-publish. I'm not holding my breath.

    Until then Worldcat and interlibrary loan provide an excellent way to sample some of these treasures. It is, of course, illegal to borrow and then scan or photocopy them.

  14. #36
    Registered User Carl23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Quote Originally Posted by John Goodin View Post

    My real hope is that the owner of the copyrights for these works will either offer the remaining stock (if they haven't already been pulped) for sale again or will release them into the public domain for others to share and/or re-publish. I'm not holding my breath.

    Until then Worldcat and interlibrary loan provide an excellent way to sample some of these treasures. It is, of course, illegal to borrow and then scan or photocopy them.
    I feel your frustration. there is a great book on Guatemalan Marimba that is just about impossible to purchase. Inter-library loan was the only option. (Marimba is one of my other passions in life)

    The nice thing about a document like this one is that it is a reference to other things. My short term needs are humble, so this will satisfy me for the moment.

    The type of document that it is would be a great candidate for an online database. However someone would need to purchase the copy-write, transfer it to a database, then publish a site (with appropriate searches and filters of course).

    then we could expand on it with more current materials...

    If you are going to dream, dream BIG!

    ;-)

    Carl
    "The Loar" LM-520
    Ludwig & Ludwig 8-370X Marimba
    Slingerland Modified Drumset
    Hand made profesional djembes from Guinea and Maili West Africa
    and toys... lots and lots of toys.

    Hey... I have a blog here!
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/blogs/53556
    Feel free to stop on by and let me know what you think!

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  16. #37
    Pataphysician Joe Bartl's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    I have attached a PDF document to help someone start searching the Library of Congress online catalog for mandolin music. Please be aware that this is for a catalog of bibliographic records, not scans of music scores. While the Library does have these scores, they have not yet been scanned. If you live in the Washington, DC area or are visiting, you can stop by and visit the Library’s Performing Arts Reading Room to request any of these scores. If you cannot visit, I believe you can request photocopies of public domain materials, but this will involve time and $$$$.

    The attached guide is a simple and simplified instruction meant only as an entrée into the complexities of the catalog. If there is something that needs clarification or if you have questions, please feel free to ping me at mandojoe@comcast.net.

    FYI, I am posting this in the two places where there have been recent threads relating to finding mandolin music online.

    Joe Bartl
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails SEARCHING MANDOLIN SCORES AT THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS.pdf  

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  18. #38
    Registered User Carl23's Avatar
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Bartl View Post
    I have attached a PDF document to help someone start searching the Library of Congress online catalog for mandolin music. ..... l
    Well.... so much for sleeping tonight.



    thanks for this!

    C
    "The Loar" LM-520
    Ludwig & Ludwig 8-370X Marimba
    Slingerland Modified Drumset
    Hand made profesional djembes from Guinea and Maili West Africa
    and toys... lots and lots of toys.

    Hey... I have a blog here!
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/blogs/53556
    Feel free to stop on by and let me know what you think!

  19. #39
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    Default Re: Mandolin classical literature

    Thank you Martin for posting the trio; Nice that it is in what I consider the correct clefs. I can read them all to a degree, I used to conduct from full orchestral scores, but when I pick up my K4 I want to see bass clef. Paul Sparks refers to "the farce of universal notation." A trio is good because I have another classical player nearby (I moved last year, lost a lot of nearby's) as well as a very enthusiastic mandola-ist. We talked about playing trios, so I'll see if I can get us together for this one. And I am all set for the solo material at this year's CMSA, some really great developments there.

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