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Thread: Playing notation G/F#

  1. #1

    Default Playing notation G/F#

    So, I'm just working on playing some rhythm by playing along with some of my favorite songs. I looked up the chords for one I want to work on. As often happens, I find the chords on a guitar site.

    This particular song starts in G, then switches to a G/F#. I know what that means on a guitar, but I don't have that much theory knowledge (or practical knowledge for that matter). How would you play that on a mandolin?

    My first guess would be to go from 0023 to 0021. But when you do this on the guitar the point is to get the F# in on the low end, so I'm not sure that is right. Could do 10-9-10-10 for the G/F# but not sure where I would get there from? 12-9-10-10? Not all that used to playing up the neck that far at this point, still pretty much a beginner but I could work on it.

    Thoughts?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    I usually don’t worry too much about slash chords. Especially if there is a guitar or bass player. To me it would depend on the context and whether or not that bass note is important to the harmonic flow. I would probably just play a G there.

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  4. #3

    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    Make sure you're playing an F# as distinguished from an F natural. A couple of you fingerings have Fs and not F#s.

    The note below the slash indicates the desired bass note. So you need to look at a progression, not just one or two chords.

    What's the next chord after G/F#? How many beats for the G/F#?

    Likely, it sets up a descending bass line of G--F#-E.

    It might work to play a G chord, then a single note F#, then an E minor chord.

    The whole thing might be easier with three note chords. E.g, 12-9-10-x 11-9-10-x 9-9-10-x.

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  6. #4
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    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    If you use the 0-5-2-3 G chord fingering, then you can include the F# as 0-4-2-3
    Mitch Russell

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  8. #5
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    Yep, context & arrangement. If you’re aiming for solo mandolin arrangement rather than group play, use the suggestions of using different chord voicing than 0023, or the single F# note in a “bass run”. I personally like experimenting with solo mandolin arrangements and make frequent use of “bass runs”. Folk like to point out that there are no bass notes on a mandolin, but for solo playing, I think it’s all relative to what else you’re doing and perfectly appropriate to think of “bass notes”.
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  9. #6

    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    Ive often thought of the guitar as a harmonic background instrument to help the singer. The mandolin on the other hand is definitely up front. There are players that pick really fast and this, to my ears, sometimes sounds like chordal background, your mind connects all of the recent notes and melodic trails into small and large key like feelings.

    Im not describing it well, but I think that often as in Oldtime, silence or even monotony can be used as the background to great effect, with really simple note threads using volume change and slight hesitation, bounce, etc that stand out, as with your base runs of G, F#, E for example.
    And while you do the run, the G will still be ‘heard’ because it’s remembered.

    Keep it simple. Don’t be afraid to give the listener space to personalise what they hear.
    My 2 cents

  10. #7

    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    Quote Originally Posted by StuartE View Post
    Make sure you're playing an F# as distinguished from an F natural. A couple of you fingerings have Fs and not F#s.

    The note below the slash indicates the desired bass note. So you need to look at a progression, not just one or two chords.

    What's the next chord after G/F#? How many beats for the G/F#?

    Likely, it sets up a descending bass line of G--F#-E.

    It might work to play a G chord, then a single note F#, then an E minor chord.

    The whole thing might be easier with three note chords. E.g, 12-9-10-x 11-9-10-x 9-9-10-x.

    It's four beats. The progression is a G G/F# Em7 C.

    I think if I was playing in a group it would work to just stay on the G, but i think if I am just strumming along solo it is going to sound better to have progression there. Thanks all for your suggestions, I'm going to play around with a couple of them.

  11. #8

    Default Re: Playing notation G/F#

    If you are playing alone, and the descent is melodically important, I've found that it can be placed in the "middle" pretty effectively. In this case maybe 4-5-5-x (G), 4-4-5-x (G/F#in the middle), 4-2-2-x (Em-ish), 5-2-3-x (C) . Anyway, the point being that the run-down doesn't always need to be at the base of the chord.

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