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Thread: Mandolin sound changing over time

  1. #26

    Default Re: Mandolin sound changing over time

    Quote Originally Posted by Don Grieser View Post
    While it doesn't reach the level of scientific evidence......
    Well that certainly says it all.
    Play it like you mean it.

  2. #27
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    Default Re: Mandolin sound changing over time

    What about short term changes? How many of us think their instruments sound better after playing it x minutes after its been in the case for a week, a month? Can we separate out the player vs instrument warming up by playing a different instrument before testing the "waking-up" nature of the instrument in question?
    -Newtonamic

  3. #28

    Default Re: Mandolin sound changing over time

    There is some evidence to bear this out. Instruments that are played get played in certain modes, in certain keys, that cause the wood to vibrate in ways that are more pleasing. The more the instrument is played, the more it starts to respond in certain ways that the physical structure is used to. Think about vibrations in your car. Things start to rub and respond in ways that are typical for the way that car is driven. I feel that same is true for musical instruments: they begin to respond in more musical ways, assuming they are played in ways that produce the desirable sound. Very good, antique violins are often prized not only because of their heritage but because of the great musicians who have played them, this adds to their provenance. This makes them "played in."

  4. #29
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    Default Re: Mandolin sound changing over time

    I know when my mandolin was not broken in other mandolin players would say "your mandolin sounds great except for the G string". Now many years later the G string sounds great along with the rest of the mandolin. No memory involved, although I know how the G string changed, but others opinions over the years. Now the comments are "that is a great sounding mandolin". The G string is completely different than it was the first several years, it's easy to hear and I don't think my technique could make the change, I have played a long time before this mandolin and have not done anything different that I am aware of, tho it could happen. Many many hours of playing have definitely opened this mandolin up. When new others have said it was bright in the highs, now it is warm and lovely and complex, and a joy to play.
    THE WORLD IS A BETTER PLACE JUST FOR YOUR SMILE!

  5. #30
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    Default Re: Mandolin sound changing over time

    The question I have is. If auditory memory is so short, how did I know Dad's banjo had been apart (post 20) I realize that I'm talking about an instrument that I " knew" very well, had heard every day while I was living at home and had heard many times the difference in sound when it had recently been apart but if not memory how did I know it had been apart after not hearing it for a week or so. I think I noticed every time and never accused wrongly. By the way Dad seldom took the banjo apart, hebwas not one to work on it on a whim.

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