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Thread: About my pick grip

  1. #26
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    Default Re: About my pick grip

    another vid that i keep posting: Bush, McCoury, Joliff, Skehan, Hoffman, they're all holding pick the same way except for the one

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hTJJdlswFPE

    I find if my index finger is curled in, middle follows that and ring/pinky follow again, but if index finger is open, whole hand is open. Also an armrest really helps, it's the 3rd possible place you can plant something
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  3. #27

    Default Re: About my pick grip

    This thread got me to reevaluate my pick grip.

    I have been using the pinky plant, going to stop using it, it is almost certainly holding me back.

    As a student of Ms Lichtenberg, I admit I hold the pick like she does, and as Calace did before her (his method book documents that exact pick grip).

    My theory is this grip is likely some kind of tradeoff. Classical requires very delicate control of dynamics, on a note per note basis, my theory is that this grip allows the fingers to be used to provide more nuance than a pure wrist-driven picking style can. Not sure what is lost however.
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  5. #28
    Oval holes are cool David Lewis's Avatar
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    Default Re: About my pick grip

    I was told that the pick should be an enhancement for the flesh of the thumb by a teacher I had. John mcgann in an interview on here said you should bow it like a violin. Both of these were useful for me

    I Am almost obsessive about playing instruments as they should be played. Guitar technique is different. Iím a guitarist but whenever a guitarist tells me Ďif it has frets I can play ití I shake my head and wait for then to back it up. About 80% canít back it up.

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  7. #29
    Registered User DavidKOS's Avatar
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    Default Re: About my pick grip

    Quote Originally Posted by kurth83 View Post
    My theory is this grip is likely some kind of tradeoff. Classical requires very delicate control of dynamics, on a note per note basis, my theory is that this grip allows the fingers to be used to provide more nuance than a pure wrist-driven picking style can. Not sure what is lost however.
    Sheer volume.

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  9. #30
    Registered User DougC's Avatar
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    Default Re: About my pick grip

    My pick hold changes according to what I'm doing. Playing light and quiet is similar to Caterina. Playing fast is like Chris T. And doing tremolo I use the rounded side of the pick. Strumming is more like guitar work.

    Also the mental concept and muscle memory focuses on the whole arm, sort of whipping the end. (which activates the string). I seem to get tense when I think of just my hand.

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