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Thread: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

  1. #26
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    Quote Originally Posted by belbein View Post
    I don't see her talking about chords or chord tones. She's saying to do cascading arpegios
    The definition of arpeggio necessitates chord tones. Arpeggio = broken chord (chord broken into single notes).

    About the chord theory - the OP, HonketyHank, made a neat little video about this a while back for The Woodshed Study Group here -- a video by a newbie, for newbies -- that explains this graphically. Give him some love by checking it out:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7fQnBhl9TUo
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  3. #27
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    I'm not hearing any minor arpegs or diminished arpegs in those exercises.
    Sierra is just creating a major arpeggio starting on each note of the major scale. Am I wrong?
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” ≠ “Accidentals”

  4. #28
    Registered User Scotter's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Philphool View Post
    I'm not hearing any minor arpegs or diminished arpegs in those exercises.
    Sierra is just creating a major arpeggio starting on each note of the major scale. Am I wrong?
    You're absolutely right, kinda, sorta, not really. You're right in that she is creating AN arpeggio by starting on each note of the major scale. She creates these arpeggios by counting up 1, 3 and 5 scale degrees WITHIN the A major scale which results in the arpeggios listed by bigskygirl.

    I've altered my original tab to reflect the resultant major, minor, and diminished arpeggios produced by doing this.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    You'll notice that this fits with a typical major chord key chart:
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Also notice that the resultant minor and diminished arpeggios can then be used in a similar manner as the first exercise in the Sierra Hull video.
    Play that which you feel is groovy, get down with your bad self, and shake your money maker if it makes sense for you to do so.

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  6. #29

    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    The confusion is because she doesn’t really explain it well...at the 4:10 mark she says take each note and treat it as its own thing then she does the arpeggios (chord tones) in the key of A...A,Bm,C#m,D,E,F#m,G#dim,A. As a tool for use in improv, you can add this to your repertoire and play these to run up over a chord progression. She does it in turkey with just the G arpeggio to move up the fretboard.

    For the 2nd part of the video Scotters tab in post #28 is a good reference and mmuussicall(sorry for sp) did notes and tabs in #28 for other keys.
    Last edited by bigskygirl; May-06-2019 at 8:39am.
    Northfield F5M #268, AT02 #7

  7. #30
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    Quote Originally Posted by Scotter View Post
    You're absolutely right, kinda, sorta, not really. You're right in that she is creating AN arpeggio by starting on each note of the major scale. She creates these arpeggios by counting up 1, 3 and 5 scale degrees WITHIN the A major scale which results in the arpeggios listed by bigskygirl.
    ....
    You're right. I was wrong. I didn't notice that Sierra was playing ONLY the notes within 2 octaves of the A major scale and was indeed creating major triads for scale notes 1, 4, & 5, and was creating minor triads for notes 2, 3, & 6, and a diminished triad for note 7. My mistake.
    This is pretty cool and will take me a while to get these smooth and up to speed.
    Thanks.
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” ≠ “Accidentals”

  8. #31
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    A really nice exercise and it got everybody thinking about chord building ... great stuff
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

  9. #32
    Registered User Scotter's Avatar
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    Default Re: A few neat exercises from Sierra Hull and Reverb

    Y'all,

    I'm getting over the flu this week and haven't had much time to practice this one. But, just thinking out loud (over lunch), since diminished chords repeat themselves every three frets then you should be able to just slide the diminished arpeggio up every three frets for different inversions of the same diminished arpeggio. Think Django Reinhardt.

    As mentioned before this exercise by Sierra Hull should work with the modes too. Try doing the same thing with both the minor scale and mixolydian.
    Play that which you feel is groovy, get down with your bad self, and shake your money maker if it makes sense for you to do so.

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