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Thread: Converting guitar chords

  1. #26

    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    I’d already been playing guitar for 30-odd years when I started the mandolin around 7 years ago. Someone told me it was a bit like an “upside-down guitar”. And so, for the first couple of weeks, that’s how I treated it. Which really messes with your head!

    After a few weeks, I then decided to actually learn it as a completely new instrument, and that’s when stuff started to fall into place.

    Enjoy the journey!

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  3. #27
    The Amateur Mandolinist Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    Some people seem to get some mileage out of that “upside down” guitar stuff. More power to them, but I can’t see it that way. I’ve played guitar over 50 years, mandolin only about 5.

    To me, going DOWN by 4ths is not at all the same as going UP by 5ths. The note names are the same, granted, and you can find a chord fingering with correct notes by “translating” that way, but for me it would be a codgy way of conversing with a new instrument.

    To each his own, of course.
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  4. #28
    Oval holes are cool David Lewis's Avatar
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    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    I have to agree with you mark. It sort of works in open positions, but after that, working out the note, then working out it’s equivalent on guitar, then working out the intervals, rather than just knowing the notes and the chords on the mandolin...
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  5. #29
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    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    One conversion:
    The mandolin is a melodic instrument.
    You may often find yourself playing a melody and then wanting to add a chord. Chords are usually best added BELOW the melody note of the mando. The higher melody note keeps the tune melodic. So the playing would often be on the first string with a chord or maybe an added third double stop (to become a 2/3 major or minor chord) on the second string.

    The guitar is very versatile, and to get that fuller melodic/harmonic sound it often plays some sort of melodic-like alternating bass line with chords on TOP.

  6. #30
    Registered User mmuussiiccaall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    Here's a pic of a method to convert guitar chords to mandolin, I'll leave the explanation off. Anyone care to solve the puzzle?

    Click image for larger version. 

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  7. #31
    Registered User Bunnyf's Avatar
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    Default Re: Converting guitar chords

    Quote Originally Posted by atsunrise View Post
    One conversion:
    The mandolin is a melodic instrument.
    You may often find yourself playing a melody and then wanting to add a chord. Chords are usually best added BELOW the melody note of the mando. The higher melody note keeps the tune melodic. So the playing would often be on the first string with a chord or maybe an added third double stop (to become a 2/3 major or minor chord) on the second string...
    This is why Pickloser’s guide to double stops was sooo helpful to me. I can pick the melody out by ear and now that I know where all the double stop are, I can sprinkle them in, and I know what my options are if I want to form a chord.

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