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Thread: Fingerboard Diagram

  1. #1
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Fingerboard Diagram

    Does anyone know of a resource for a fingerboard diagram without notes? I can make my own but why do so if one is available? My plan is to use it to help me learn notes I don't use regularly by guessing the note where my finger randomly lands.
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  3. #2

    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I know this is not answering your question, but I use a guitar tuner app on my phone to do something similar.

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    Orrig Onion HonketyHank's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Try this page: http://www.mandozine.com/resources/fretboard/index.html

    Lots of diagrams, exercises, flash card games aimed at just what you are working on.
    New to mando? Click this link -->Newbies to join us at the Newbies Social Group.

    Just send an email to rob.meldrum@gmail.com with "mandolin setup" in the subject line and he will email you a copy of his ebook for free (free to all mandolincafe members).

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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Check out music theory.net, look for Fretboard Note Identification and download the application. This app displays the mandolin fretboard (although it also has guitar, banjo, etc) and notes pop up. You need to correctly identify which note it is. Once you properly identify a note, another one pops up. It is a timed challenge that will allow you to measure your progress as you improve you will get more notes correct. It has helped me to improve my memory of the fretboard. Check it out.

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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I did find one called 'Music Notes' it's for iPhone (though) which really helped me to read music.
    It gives you a moving score and you have to press the right buttons on a virtual mandolin fretboard. Horribly addictive but fast learning.

    I'm looking for a similar thing as you Sherry, I think. For a change I'd like to find a mobile phone app. with a virtual fretboard where it stays in a key and gives you just the names of the notes like, G, A, F# etc on a moving banner. In that way I'd get used to looking at the empty fretboard and seeing patterns in a sort of FFcP system way -seeing the frets as the names of the notes.
    That is, not going straight from the black dots to the fingers without thinking of anything else (though which in itself is fast and pretty cool anyway).

    OR. The ideal for me at this stage would be maybe an app. where you have an empty virtual fretboard and you are given a key to work with. Then you have to point out all the 1sts (roots) and then all the 4ths and then 5ths plus each of their double stop thirds on the adjacent string below or string above.
    Then, with the same key, you have to go through all the notes that need minor thirds, ie. the 2ths, 3ths, 6ths and 7ths.
    Then you do the same thing with all the fifths of each note in the scale, the fifth on the string below and the fifth on the string above. Not forgetting the 7th note and it's rogue fifths! (in terms of position)


    Wow, not such a quick reply, sorry I wrote so much, guys! :D

    Aaah, another would be where it just gives you a tone and you have to find it on the fretboard AND the harmonising thirds...

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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    mandolin fretboard - no notes - done in powerpoint I think
    My way of learning scales and chords. Try starting on any root note, labeling it's major scale, then circle the 1, 3, and 5 notes to make a chord and double stop chart.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails mandolin fretboard blank.pdf  

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    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Too often I forget about Google! I like what Mark sent and will check it out from my desktop.

    Simon, have you tried the Violin Cards app? Maybe it would provide what you're looking for.
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Goggle and Mark have the blank sheets, I use a tuner attached to the Peghead much the same way Marty does but the most helpful thing I found is that Guitar Toolkit app has a mode where I can indicate the notes and it will tell me what the chord is/could be. Very handy for figuring out what is going on...one thing I’ve been working on lately is Watson’s Blues and just trying to come up with some variations all over the fretboard since we tend to jam on it for awhile. I discovered that the double stop D xx910 (F# D), makes a fabulous B7 alternative coming off the xx97 B and it works all over the fretbord with any key. The thing about the mando is since we often play partial chords the doublestop 95 (E, G) sounds like a C and can be a fine Em sounding thing as well as working over other keys and chord progressions.

    There are fine resources out there for me to study endlessly but I’m not so good about grabbing a book or learning and memorizing patterns, when I’m dabbling around and get that a-ha moment, it sticks.
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    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I was looking for the blank sheets to help me learn what notes are where as I move beyond first position.

    Right now I'm struggling with 3 finger chords and double stops. Why didn't I take up this playing an instrument thing at 12 instead of xxx? It would help if Jon Hall would move to Irving, Texas so I could have a great mandolin teacher who understands how I learn!
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  16. #11
    Registered User Jon Hall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Sherry, thank you for the encouragement! I look forward to our next lesson, whether it's in Irving or Nacogdoches.

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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Yes, having a teacher is probably best.

    Here's a resource I like, not the whole fretboard though:
    https://quizlet.com/310791881/mandol...n-flash-cards/

  18. #13
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Same here, Jon!

    Simon, I have an excellent teacher. She's a classically trained violinist/violist and plays in the Dallas Opera orchestra. She's a good friend, with 2 masters degrees, one in music education. Sadly, she doesn't play mandolin. I've tried a couple of mandolin teachers in the area. Unfortunately, I don't learn the way they teach.
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  19. #14
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Failed to mention I have no talent, which doesn't help.

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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Here's that most wonderful guide to double stops, Pickloser's
    -I find it good think in a key, then to look at a position on the fretboard and see at the same time it's friends, cousins etc., the position of which depend on the key. It's sort of jumping from a note named on the fretboard to others by position.
    https://www.mandolincafe.com/forum/e...to-Doublestops

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  22. #16
    Registered User Bunnyf's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I love, love, love Pickloser’s guide to double stops! It’s been my bedtime reading every night, for a while now. I, too, am in the process of trying to internalize the fretboard, mentally and physically. I alternate between Pickloser’s guide and Pete Martin’s great chord tone scale and improv series. I’m close to having it all in my head but I’m still working on getting it under my fingers.

  23. #17
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I believe I may have bought something a couple of years ago from Pete Martin on double stops. I'll look for it. Since my daily practice routine consists primarily of playing written music, I try to add double stops where the written music shows the notes. The challenge is getting 2 fingers to move to 2 different notes simultaneously while keeping the beat. Same with 3 finger chords. I suppose it just needs practice, practice, practice.
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    Registered User belbein's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I have Pete Martin's stuff. I also have Picklosers. What you like depends on how you learn. I found Pickloser's more spoke to me, but that's no knock on Pete Martin, who produces great stuff.

    I discovered something interesting about learning yesterday. I've been using that tablet program--the game of identifying random notes on the fretboard for a week or so. And of course I'd been playing scales, so learning the fretboard in a linear fashion. What I discovered yesterday is that I feel a whole lot more confident now in frets 5-7 ... and what helped me was that I have two rubricks going on in my head: the linear pattern of the scales, and the non-linear patterns I've been learning from the game. When I'm looking at finding a note, both patterns kind of work together to doublecheck each other. It's really, really interesting.

    Now I can see the faint glimmers of the fretboard notes becoming intuitive. Playing them in any musical way still eludes me, of course.
    belbein

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  25. #19
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Belbein, what tablet program?
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    Registered User Bunnyf's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    I’m at the point with Pickloser’s guide that wherever I am, I know many double stops. Now I just have to be able to know where I am.

  27. #21
    Registered User mmuussiiccaall's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Quote Originally Posted by belbein View Post

    Now I can see the faint glimmers of the fretboard notes becoming intuitive. Playing them in any musical way still eludes me, of course.

    Here's my chart that shows the intervals of the major scale in all 12 keys. Everything that can be played can be analized using it.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Registered User belbein's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Thanks, MM. It probably won't help me, but may help someone else. I don't visualize things this way, so it just doesn't stick. But I appreciate your posting it and I'll take a look.

  30. #23
    Registered User belbein's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    It's called Fretboard Learn, for Android. It generates random notes on a fretboard diagram and you supply the name. Groups of ten in a session, so not overwhelming. You can select which strings, which sets off frets, work your way up the fretboard or down. The improvement in my note recognition is aMAZing. I'm up to about fret 7 as of today and heading north. It's not only teaching me notes, but teaching me to recognize the places I tend to make mistakes. (Like D#, fret one on the D string, of all the stupid places.)

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  32. #24
    Registered User Sherry Cadenhead's Avatar
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    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    That's a great app, Belbein! I may have to figure out how to turn off that timer, though!
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  33. #25

    Default Re: Fingerboard Diagram

    Quote Originally Posted by belbein View Post
    It's called Fretboard Learn, for Android. It generates random notes on a fretboard diagram and you supply the name. Groups of ten in a session, so not overwhelming. You can select which strings, which sets off frets, work your way up the fretboard or down. ..
    Thanks! I just installed it & gave it a test drive for a couple minutes, not bad at all. Seems useful.

    Maybe now I can finally get more comfortable with reading standard notation in some of those flat keys. I seldom have any reason to play notes like Eb & Bb etc in the genres I play, so my fingers don't automatically go to the correct frets if the note is something 'weird' like Ab. But occasionally there are tunes in different keys that look interesting.

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