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Thread: Quick and Thick Titebond

  1. #1

    Default Quick and Thick Titebond

    Anyone tried this out and how does it compare to the other Titebonds? Siminoff swears by Titebond Original and others use nothing but Hot Hide Glue. I have use Titebond Hide glue and it seems to work great.

  2. #2
    Teacher, luthier
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    Default Re: Quick and Thick Titebond

    Haven't tried it, but it is a polyvinyl acetate [PVA] glue, which differs from Titebond Original, which is an aliphatic resin.

    I did try the Titebond 2 [PVA] glue when it first came out, and was not happy with it. It didn't seem to cure as hard, and at least one flat top bridge job came back. I don't like returns.

    I'm going to stick to Titebond Original, I know what to expect from it. I also use quite a bit of hot hide glue.

    I have used Titebond hide glue in the past, but not for high stress joints. If you use it, make sure that it is no more than one year old, double the drying time, and store the glue in the refrigerator. I have sometimes had trouble finding a fresh bottle. Now I only use the stuff for frets, nuts, and other low stress jobs.

    These days, I am making my own slow tack hide glue instead. My current recipe is 10 grams water, 5 grams hide glue granules, and 0.5 gram urea. You still have to warm it, but it has a much longer open time than straight hot hide glue. Again, I double the drying time. But I still use straight hot hide glue except when I have concerns about open time.

    I now resist trying the "newest glue on the market." I have learned to wait for a new glue to be proven for at least a couple of years. Since I'm now over 60, I probably won't be changing glues much in the future.

    The only "new" glue that I use is Wilsonart Lokweld Melamine glue, which I use for repairing loose bindings on finished instruments. It is made for bonding non-porous materials to wood. Cabinet makers use it to bond Formica to countertop bases. I consider it to be experimental in lutherie, but it is non-invasive to finishes, so I have been willing to take the risk, rather than risk finish damage from binding cements or CA. Its bonding strength is fairly modest, so I would not recommend it for high stress joints.

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  4. #3
    Mandolin & Mandola maker
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    Default Re: Quick and Thick Titebond

    Titebond original is one type of PVA glue. Aliphatic resin is a marketing thing to distinguish it from other glues. PVA glues are made with all sorts of different additives that make them have quite different characteristics but the basic chemistry is the same.
    Peter Coombe - mandolins, mandolas and guitars
    http://www.petercoombe.com

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  6. #4
    Teacher, luthier
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    Default Re: Quick and Thick Titebond

    Yes, but the glue does have different properties.
    They classify it differently for more than just marketing purposes.

    At this point, I usually stick to things that are proven in our craft. I don't like returns.
    Not all yellow glues are created equal.

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  8. #5
    Teacher, luthier
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    Default Re: Quick and Thick Titebond

    Good old Elmer's white glue also has a PVA base, but I sure wouldn't use it, even though Martin used something pretty close to it for 25 years.

    I don't know whether to thank them or curse them for it.

    I guess I'll thank them for guaranteeing me work repairing failed glue joints and warped necks, and curse them when I'm trying to get all of the durn stuff out of the joints. It don't sand or scrape worth a darn, and water or alcohol just drives it deeper into the wood.

    It does turn loose at a nice low temperature though, maybe 100 degrees F. You could almost take it apart with a hair dryer.

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