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Thread: I-IV-V Chords?

  1. #1
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    Default I-IV-V Chords?

    Hi Folks.

    So I've used the G-C-D chord patterns to get pretty good at mixing them up (2,3,4 finger versions). I enjoy cross picking between them as well just to play with various melodies.

    The three chords sound "right" together, and I've been told there are several other I-IV-V chord patterns I also should be getting to know on the mando that similarly have that major/comforting "feel." And some cool minor ones, too!

    If anyone can point a few of them out, and the 2,3, or 4 finger chordings for each that sounds best when played together and/or helps train one's left hand for changing chords, I'd be grateful!

    Thanks!
    John

  2. #2

    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    This aught to keep you busy...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chord_progression

    Using the I IV V vocabulary is a huge help looking in to this (also a good way to start adding chords to your vocabulary)

    Also: https://www.libertyparkmusic.com/com...-progressions/

    Another thing to look for is building I IV V chords on the chords you already have (some will be 2 - 3 finger chords, other not so much)

    I - IV - V
    G - C - D
    C - F - G
    D - G - A

    Then build from there

    also, user minor
    i - iv - v
    Gmin - Cmin - D min (etc)

    Good luck!

    C

    PS: find a good mandolin chord book as well... best way to find good chord voicings.

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  4. #3
    mandolin slinger Steve Ostrander's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    The Circle of Fifths is a helpful tool to learn the I-IV-V relationships.
    Never say "bouzouki" to a TSA agent...

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  6. #4
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Carl23 links to some studies, and Steve makes a point about the usefulness of the Circle of Fifths when you study chords. It is a good thing to learn to play the I-IV-V chords in all twelve keys. But at least you'll be learning them in whatever keys you like to play whichever songs in ...

    A cool thing about the circle of fifths is that with three "slices of the pie" in one place you can immediately see the I ii iii IV V and vi chords for any key! (and a bite off the next clockwise slice points to the diminished chord). It's a visual thing, so here are some visuals for you to see what we're getting at using the key you mentioned, G major:

    Circle of Fifths
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    Diatonic Harmony (Chords) in G major are highlighted
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    Pattern of Chord Numbers
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    1. The Circle of Fifths shows all twelve Major keys around the outside, with their twelve relative minor keys around the inside.
    2. Pick any Major key (in your own example, G major) as the root, or I chord. Right next to it, clockwise, is the name of the V chord. Counter-clockwise next to the root is the IV chord. This works for every key around the circle.
    3. The second and third images above show the relationships of the chords in those 3-1/2 slices of the pie, that belong to the key of G major.

    I think it is extremely helpful for any student of music to have a circle of fifths handy (I always have one on the wall) so he or she can find all the chords of a key at a glance. It's a great tool.
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
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  8. #5

    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    I find it helpful to study the I-IV-V chord patterns using three different three-string voicings (muting the E-string in all cases).

    Using the key of A as an example:

    The first I-IV-V on the mandolin (A-D-E) is:

    224x 245x 122x

    Here the first shape has the root on the G string. The second shape has the root on the A string and the third shape has the root on the D string.

    The next I-IV-V is:

    677x 779x 467x

    First shape is the same "root on D" shape. Second shape is the same "root on G" shape. Third shape is the same "root on A" shape.

    The next I-IV-V is:

    9|11|12|x 11|12|12|x 9|9|11|x

    Root on A shape first. Root on D shape next and Root on G shape last.

    The beauty of the mandolin is that the relationship of one chord shape to another never changes. If you fully understand this then you have all the I-IV-Vs.

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  10. #6

    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    this discussion is making me think of a question (might be good for a new thread?)

    When learning the fret-board, beyond first position, do you start from chord shapes or note names?

    I started by laying out all of the note names for all frets up to the 14th fret. Then I mapped out common chords.
    This made the chord shapes obvious to me, and helped me use the chord shapes to find note names for the upper 3 strings (G string was my base for finding notes.) This is a bit of a "chicken and the egg" experience.

    I notice people use "A shape" and "D shape" as above. I have to translate this in my head (A shape = minor; root position, D shape = Major; third position)

    Does this make sense to anyone else?

    Carl

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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Thanks to all, and especially Mark, for this great info.

    Why do the I-IV-V combination of chords -- or any notes played together within those chords -- sound so "right?"

    I better bone up on the circle!

  12. #8
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmony

    Scroll down to Intervals and start reading. Much to digest.
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” ≠ “Accidentals”

  13. #9

    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Get a copy of The Chord Wheel
    Great book/pamphlet.
    10 bucks. Maybe 14.

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  14. #10
    Registered User Bob Visentin's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    We have a cheap clock in our practice room that I opened up and replaced the clock face numbers with the circle of fifths. It is very handy and we joke all the time about it getting close to Bb. Time to quit.

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  16. #11
    Registered User Tom C's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Try adding a G7 (I) before going to the C (IV) G G7 C
    Substitute an Em for the G (relative minor being the 6th in G scale)

  17. #12
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Circle of 5th wheel for "4th graders" ordered!

    My education begins. All my 60 years, I've had a "mental block" with music theory. I desperately want to have a basic understanding of the language and be able to apply to getting more enjoyment from playing my mando. Yet I've never for some reason been able to reset my mind to be as open to the theory as a 10 year old and see it as something wonderful versus incomprehensible.

    My hope is that I'll be able to hear a favorite tune, and somehow use my ear and someday soon basic understanding of how finding the root can allow me to quickly figure out what 3-4 chords (and the notes they contain) can allow me to explore playing along on my mando!

    If anyone knows of an almost foolproof illustrated book that is for young children and does a great job on just the theory I should know going in, please let me know?

    Many thanks! Happy picking, everyone!
    John

  18. #13
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    Here's my favorite. I learned a lot pretty painlessly.
    Edley's Music Theory For Practical People
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” ≠ “Accidentals”

  19. #14
    Mandolin Friendly Mark Gunter's Avatar
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    Default Re: I-IV-V Chords?

    This odd-shaped little book makes it pretty simple, IMO. I've given some of these out. Uses some illustrations.
    Music Theory Made Easy

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    And, on Amazon with look inside feature
    Technique, theory and fun, fun, fun. I love playing, studying and sharing MUSIC.
    "Life is short. Play hard." - AlanN
    ------------------------
    HEY! The Cafe has Social Groups, check 'em out. I'm in these groups:
    Newbies Social Group | The Song-A-Week Social
    The Woodshed Study Group | Collings Mandolins | MandoCymru
    - Advice For Mandolin Beginners
    - YouTube Stuff

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