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Thread: What’s the hardest tune you can play on mandolin? (Or family)

  1. #76
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    Default Re: What’s the hardest tune you can play on mandolin? (Or family)

    Search Google and hit the "images" button.
    I never tried to play the double-time passages in that tune.
    The clarinet player did it with ease...

  2. #77
    Registered User Tom Wright's Avatar
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    Default Re: What’s the hardest tune you can play on mandolin? (Or family)

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel Glassman View Post
    I never tried to play the double-time passages in that tune. The clarinet player did it with ease...
    I found the chart at Scribd.

    I can probably get the 32nd note bars up to speed after some work because they are kind of scale-like and each bar is the same as the previous one for fingering convenience (up a minor third each time). I’m already close, but what blows my mind is Hamilton playing the main body of the choro at double time. Never, ever, and few in the world could come close to that, I think.

    I’m working on Dudu Maia’s “Turuna”, a very arpeggiating choro waltz, like O Voo da Mosca but with wild jumps. Because Dudu posts some sheet music for free download I’ll offer it — you might like working on this. I included some fingerings that help with the large leaps.
    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #78
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    Default Re: What’s the hardest tune you can play on mandolin? (Or family)

    Thanks Tom--
    I find choro based on arpeggiated figures to be the best technical
    practice. Its also much more melodically interesting than the usual exercises.
    Will check this out.

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