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Thread: Weber, the best years.

  1. #51

    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    It would be after 2012.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Buckingham View Post
    Didn't know they had a bad year. We've got an 03 and a 12 and they both hoss's.

  2. #52
    Registered User Kevin Briggs's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    Quote Originally Posted by ABmando View Post
    It would be after 2012.
    I think I can get on board with this, although Iíll say more specifically when Bruce exited the scene not too long ago. With all due to respect to current Weber dealers, the TOH Webers Iíve recently played were not so great. I think maybe my expectations were quite high, but next to the Ellis, Gibsons, Collings, and Old Wave they sounded and felt pretty stale.

    I donít want to be a hater by any means. They were two ownable instruments, but maybe for closer to what the more expensive Eastmans cost.

  3. #53
    Mandolin user MontanaMatt's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    My understanding of the stash was that it was more in the 50 year old department...? We can ask Bruce, he might be reading this, or Mary might. My "old wood" custom has 1950's cedar and 1970's maples...
    It's not a beast, it's a beauty. I can't get rid of it cuz I know I'm going to grow past my hard drivin high mountain bluegrass phase.
    2007 Weber Custom Elite "old wood"
    2017 Ratliff R5 Custom #1148
    Several nice old Fiddles
    2007 Martin 000-15S 12 fret Auditorium-slot head
    Deering Classic Open Back
    Too many microphones

  4. #54

    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    Exactly what I was getting at. However, it is possible that this year - 2019 - that they have turned it around. Apparently, because of feedback of it going downhill, someone woke up and realized that the new people really need to "up" their skill. And apparently so. So I am hoping that this is correct. The Weber name deserves to be on great instruments.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin Briggs View Post
    I think I can get on board with this, although Iíll say more specifically when Bruce exited the scene not too long ago. With all due to respect to current Weber dealers, the TOH Webers Iíve recently played were not so great. I think maybe my expectations were quite high, but next to the Ellis, Gibsons, Collings, and Old Wave they sounded and felt pretty stale.

    I donít want to be a hater by any means. They were two ownable instruments, but maybe for closer to what the more expensive Eastmans cost.

  5. #55

    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    I was underwhelmed by the two Weber’s I’ve played lately. Not enough volume for me, but the tone was nice. But there are so many mandolin experiences I haven’t had. I’ve never played a Montana Weber, or an F style Flatiron, or even a played in Eastman, or even an older Gibson. I do need to go to Nashville.
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

  6. #56
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    I've owned a couple Webers, year models from 2003 thru 2017. All of these were different models, all were F style models. Woods were Sitka/adi/mahogany/maple.
    The models from the Bruce Weber years were all nice mandolins(2 Gallatins, one black Ice, one bitterroot), and the 2017 is from the TOH workshop and is a Yellowstone with fern appointments(custom ordered by Themandolinstore). I have played one other TOH F style that was another custom(due to color, binding, inlays).
    The Weber years mandos needed some work regarding the nuts, saddles, frets, to play optimum for my style. Not heavy involved work, but some definite attention. The 2017 model is in every way about as perfect as a shop can build. The fit, finish, setup, is top shelf. The tone is quite impressive and has a really beautiful quality-nothing harsh or brittle, just solid. I find everything about it, much better than any other Weber I've owned.
    I've had a few Collings, Gibson, a Pava, some Northfield, and Girouard. All these were fine mandos also-with the Northfield and Girouard needing nothing other than a relief adjustment and saddle height adjustment to suit my playing style. The Collings that have travelled thru my hands will typically need a little nut work(dropping the slots) and every now and then a light fret work on one or two. I've always used Collings as the standard of what is top shelf. This TOH Weber I own toes that line perfectly, and actually probably surpasses it in a couple areas.
    Having said all this, and currently owning the TOH Weber and a mighty fine torrefied top MT, the tones are dramatically different. I've always felt Webers offered a very different tone vs most other mandolins. I remember Adam at TheMandolinStore, in some older video, mentioning Webers having a "wet" tone, and Collings having a "dry" tone. I get that.
    I find myself loving my MT as I play it a few days in the row, then find the Weber totally different, but just as mesmerizing when I pick it back up again. That cycle goes round and round.
    I have only played 2 TOH Webers, so not a lot in the specimen pool, but firmly impressed with both.

    I've never played what I would consider, a "bad" Weber. The tone is different than many makers, and if you are coming from the Collings, Gibson camps, you may not bond with it.

    d

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  8. #57
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    I own a Bruce Weber Bitterrooot oval, a Collings MT, and a Pava Player, and the difference in tone is what I like about each of them - and the fit and finish on all of them is superb. I have no experience with TOH Webers, so I cannot comment on them, but I am very happy with my "Bruce" Weber mandolin.

  9. #58
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    I haven't played one of their mandolins recently, but the tone and quality of the Yellowstone MC I just traded in for a Bitterroot 20 inch scale OM were outstanding, as is the fit/finish. The OM is also very good, though I'm still adjusting to the scale length (I couldn't handle the longer scale of the MC or a 22.5 inch OM I used to have, but this one plays great, I'm just getting used to the floppier G string). Fit and finish on the OM is also excellent. I, too, worried that quality would slip after Bruce left, but that hasn't been my experience to date, though my experience with them is admittedly limited.
    Chuck

  10. #59

    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    Mine’s maple, not mahogany. 1998. Bruce did some setup work on it a few years ago and told me it’s the fourth one made. Good right out of the gate. Great fit and finish, big sound.

    Played several newer ones but none post Bruce’s departure. All were fine instruments.

    If it speaks to you, that should say it all.
    Play it like you mean it.

  11. #60
    Registered User Ken Berner's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    For what it is worth, my maple 1999 Weber Beartooth was the first decent mandolin I have owned. It was built in Belgrade, Montana and signed by Bruce Weber. This mandolin is superb in every regard and has stood the test of time. It's tonal quality is very close to my 1992 Flatiron F5 Artist.

  12. #61
    Front Porch & Sweet Tea NursingDaBlues's Avatar
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    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    I made a brief reply to the original post in 2018. Since this thread has been resurrected, with a query as to whether Weber “has undergone some improvements in the last year or so,” I guess I’ll post again.

    I have the following Weber instruments:

    2003 Custom Beartooth Traditional
    2008 Custom Vintage A (aged spruce top*)
    2009 Custom Yellowstone F (cedar top)
    2009 Custom Vintage A (aged spruce top*) (yes, I have two. I thought the first one was so exceptional that I got the second when an opportunity presented.)
    2011 Octave Gallatin A, “D” hole
    2014 Bitterroot F

    All instruments were signed by Bruce Weber. [*In 2015, I had asked Bruce Weber what the age of the legendary aged spruce was. He simply called it “aged spruce.”]

    The 2003 through 2011 instruments were all built when the company was known as Sound to Earth in Logan, MT.

    The 2014 Bitterroot was built in Bend, OR when the company name was Weber Fine Acoustic Instruments and after the merger with Two Old Hippies.

    As you can probably guess, I’m partial to Weber instruments. I like the way they fit my hands, and I like their voice. That said, I can only speak to the instruments that I have auditioned and own. I have not auditioned any Weber instruments in the past four years. In my opinion, the Weber instruments represented in the above timespan are truly fine sounding, well-crafted instruments. Of course, when I auditioned Weber instruments in preparation to purchase, some were stronger than others. Obviously, I purchased what I felt were the strongest of those I played.

    The “weakest” of the Weber instruments that I own is the 2003; but even at that, it isn’t weak. To my eyes and ears, it is a beautiful instrument with superb fit and finish and a very pleasing voice. My 2008-2009 instruments are very, very strong -- in construction and in voice; I simply get lost in the sound while playing them. The 2011 Octave is mahogany and extremely articulate; really enjoy its voice. I haven’t tried any mahogany mandolins though. The 2014 Bitterroot was a true surprise. I went to a shop to purchase some strings and I heard it from across the room. After I had the opportunity to play it, I was hooked and bought it on the spot. It simply has a voice that I would not hesitate to compare to most upper tier mandolins. And while I don’t play bluegrass, I’ve had quite a few folks comment that it is a fine bluegrass mandolin.

    I wish that I could offer some guidance on recent production Weber instruments. I truly don’t know if they have had any issues. But my experience with Weber has been quite pleasing.

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  14. #62

    Default Re: Weber, the best years.

    Quote Originally Posted by LadysSolo View Post
    I own a Bruce Weber Bitterrooot oval, a Collings MT, and a Pava Player, and the difference in tone is what I like about each of them - and the fit and finish on all of them is superb. I have no experience with TOH Webers, so I cannot comment on them, but I am very happy with my "Bruce" Weber mandolin.
    I’m with you here. Variety of tone is what makes owning multiple instruments worthwhile for me, but if I were playing regularly in a bluegrass band I could see the need to have two mandolins that were specifically strong for that style. I can understand from a collector’s perspective owning multiple F style Gibson’s if that were my interest.

    But a variety of tones is what floats my boat.
    Silverangel A
    Arches F style kit
    1913 Gibson A-1

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