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Thread: Jointing using a Stanley No. 7

  1. #1

    Default Joining using a Stanley No. 7

    I found all the parts to an ancient Stanley No. 7 that I bought off eBay many years ago. I had planned to clamp it to a bench and use it ala Bill Bussmann.

    Does it matter that the sole is pitted? And does the sole need to be perfectly flat?

    Thanks!
    Last edited by WoMando; Apr-04-2018 at 10:20pm.

  2. #2
    Adrian Minarovic
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    Default Re: Joining using a Stanley No. 7

    Quote Originally Posted by WoMando View Post
    I found all the parts to an ancient Stanley No. 7 that I bought off eBay many years ago. I had planned to clamp it to a bench and use it ala Bill Bussmann.

    Does it matter that the sole is pitted? And does the sole need to be perfectly flat?

    Thanks!
    Pitted is no problem at all if it's not severe rusted areas but just isolated dots.
    Perfectly flat is not required but if you lay machinist straigthedge (preferrably as long as the wood jointed) along and across the plen you'd better not see long bend or twist. If you see small ray of light here and there that could be still good as you are going to plane long pieces that will touch at several points at any time.
    WHen I got my Stanley, I put a long piece of good quality sandpaper (240 grit) on perfectly flat surface (I use marble plate, thick glass or laminated plywood checked for flatness) and gave it few passes. When most of the surface got marked I was satisfied. If you need to flatten the sole, start with 150-180 grit and then finish with 240. No need to go any finer, perhaps even 180 would leave smoother finish than original.
    Adrian

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  4. #3
    Registered User sunburst's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jointing using a Stanley No. 7

    I've been using a slightly rusty Buhl #7 plane (Buhl bought Stanley castings and set them up with better irons) with excellent results for years. I found it way in the back of a junk shop, covered with grime, dirt and rust, and bought it cheap. All I did was clean it a little, sharpen the irons and set the plane up for a thin cut. Out of curiosity, after several years of use, I checked it for flatness and found a slight twist in the body... that is, opposite cornets touch a flat surface. I've left it that way because it causes me no problems. (If it ain't broke, don't fix it, so to speak.)
    The fact is, it is up to us to make true cuts with a plane no matter how well it is set up, so if the sole of the plane is a little "off" it makes little difference. A lot "off" may be a different story, so truing the sole would be in order then.

    I often clamp the plane stationary and stroked the wood over the plane (a la Bussmann), and that usually works, but sometimes curly maple backs that are particularly hard work best when I clamp the wood in a bench vise and stroke the plane over the wood. I'd say experiment and do what works for you.

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  6. #4
    Registered User tonydxn's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jointing using a Stanley No. 7

    If you are going to check the flatness as described by HoGo, you should do it with the blade in the plane (of course you set the blade so it doesn't project below the sole). Although it seems illogical that the tension of clamping the blade in the plane should make any difference, apparently it can.

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  8. #5
    Registered User Inklings's Avatar
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    Default Re: Jointing using a Stanley No. 7

    Keep in mind that you can "initialize" the bottom of most planes. If I am understanding your question correctly, this procedure below should work for you. You'll just need some grits of sandpaper, and a flat piece of glass, or floor tile.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=RYyV6IUpsYk
    Last edited by Inklings; Apr-10-2018 at 9:39am.
    Kirby Francis

    Francis Guitar Repair

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