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Thread: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

  1. #1

    Default Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    The tailpiece failed on my old 1940s Stradolin, and while it's repairable, I think I'd like to add something newer to the collection since the Stradolin was in fairly rough condition to begin with. However I really did like the Stradolin neck shape, would the more affordable Kentuckys or the Eastmans be closer to that? The Stradolin has 1 1/8' nut width, I'd say a C shaped neck.

  2. #2
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Seter View Post
    The Stradolin has 1 1/8' nut width, I'd say a C shaped neck.
    Sounds like the most common neck dimensions. Barring actually visiting a store, I think your best bet is to figure out who you will buy it from and ask them about the neck dimensions.
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  4. #3

    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    Yeah I'm guessing it's more or less the standard issue A style, I'd just rather not have a neck. My bowlback has a V neck and I guess at the moment that's my top mandolin. My Lunacharsky flattop is slowly destroying itself through top sink, it's tuned down to F to help offset that. I'll just keep my eyes peeled for a good deal on an archtop made in this decade.

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  6. #4
    Mando accumulator allenhopkins's Avatar
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    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    If you like Strad-O-Lins, they crop up so frequently, that I'd say, "get a Strad that's in better shape."

    I owned a fairly rough one that I paid $25 for (really!), and when a better one was available locally, still at less than $300, I just traded the prior one in.
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  8. #5
    Mando-Accumulator Jim Garber's Avatar
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    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    Quote Originally Posted by Seter View Post
    Yeah I'm guessing it's more or less the standard issue A style, I'd just rather not have a neck.
    Ah yes, the ultimate dream for all of us would be a mandolin without a neck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Seter View Post
    My Lunacharsky flattop is slowly destroying itself through top sink, it's tuned down to F to help offset that.
    I assume that is a Russian mandolin. Those are notorious for imploding. Not high quality. Get out there and play as many mandolins as you can and see what works for you.
    Jim

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    1923 Gibson A2 black snakehead -- Brentrup A4C -- 1915 Frank Merwin Ashley violin -- Huss & Dalton DS -- 1937 Gibson L-Century -- 1939 Gibson L-00 -- ca. 1890s Fairbanks Senator Banjo -- ca. 1923 Vega Style M tenor banjo -- Gibson TB-Junior -- National RM-1

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  10. #6

    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    Whoops meant to say V neck hahah. Yeah it is a 1970s Soviet-era one I got more as just memorabilia as I study Russian language and have a general interest in Russia. I have a Lunacharsky balalaika that is a little bit higher quality but it is about a decade older. From what I gather the Lunacharsky instruments started out okay and over the decades became worse and worse with some of the 1980s ones even having plastic bodies.

  11. #7

    Default Re: Modern equivalent of a Stradolin?

    Ended up getting a great deal on a very gently used KM-156, fits the ticket as far as matching Stradolin dimension etc but it is definitely an upgrade as well. Nice having an instrument with the modern appointments like a strap button, etc. The Stradolin was repaired pretty easily, I'll use that as loaner/backup.

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