Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 26 to 30 of 30

Thread: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

  1. #26
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Manchester - Lancashire - NW England
    Posts
    13,945

    Default Re: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

    I can't help but think that if you use a ''free floating'' right hand technique,then your hand can move in directions that you might not want it to = it's not in any 'set' position. I've found that very lightly resting the outer edge of my right hand on the bridge/strings,keeps my hand in place.That way i have total control over it's position along the string length & also,across the strings. It also helps me not to 'dig in' with the pick,something that having 2 mandolins with a fingerboard extension is important. Although my Lebeda is slightly 'scooped',my Weber has a full on 'Florida'.

    Doing what i do doesn't affect the tone/volume of any of my mandolins, & i do have total pick control,which is very important. If the pic.of Chris Thile is an accurate portrayal of what he does,then i'm in good company !,
    Ivan
    Weber F-5 'Fern'.
    Lebeda F-5 "Special".
    Stelling Bellflower BANJO
    Tokai - 'Tele-alike'.
    Ellis DeLuxe "A" style.

  2. The following members say thank you to Ivan Kelsall for this post:


  3. #27
    Phil Goodson Philphool's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Statesville, NC
    Posts
    2,800

    Default Re: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

    What I don't hear talked about is what I'll call "alternate planting". (I just made that up!)

    To play accurately, something must be used as a point of reference. Medical folks use the word 'proprioception' to speak of the feedback (of pressure & touch) from body parts to the brain.

    Some folks use 'pinky planting' or hand planting as the reference point so that the brain knows where your fingers (and pick) are.

    Most 'hand floater' players actually use the forearm as their reference point (arm planters?). Looks like Thile and many others lock the inner forearm to the edge of the mandolin and from that point of reference the hand (brain) knows where the pick is. (I started using an armrest for that very reason: the edge of the mandolin was sharp and hurt my forearm.)

    So I think EVERYONE is a 'planter' (of some sort) by necessity.
    Just have to find the planting point that does the least damage to technique and instrument!
    Phil

    “Sharps/Flats” ≠ “Accidentals”

  4. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Philphool For This Useful Post:


  5. #28

    Default Re: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

    Quote Originally Posted by Philphool View Post
    What I don't hear talked about is what I'll call "alternate planting". (I just made that up!)

    Most 'hand floater' players actually use the forearm as their reference point (arm planters?). Looks like Thile and many others lock the inner forearm to the edge of the mandolin and from that point of reference the hand (brain) knows where the pick is. (I started using an armrest for that very reason: the edge of the mandolin was sharp and hurt my forearm.)
    As a beginner mando player, I did a fair amount of research on how accomplished players planted or not. Like Philpool I was uncomfortable with my forearm on the tailpiece. I tried planting (sort of) on the strings behind the bridge, but that didn't work for me. I ended up with a McClung arm rest, and it has made playing much more comfortable and positioned my hand in the right place. I plant my forearm and have had a much easier time keeping track of pick location, and I have more control. I guess I'm technically a free floater but the truth is that I am a (forearm) planter.

  6. The following members say thank you to Rdeane for this post:


  7. #29
    Registered User Ivan Kelsall's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Manchester - Lancashire - NW England
    Posts
    13,945

    Default Re: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

    From Philpool - "....Looks like Thile and many others lock the inner forearm to the edge of the mandolin, and from that point of reference, the hand (brain) knows where the pick is." Spot on Phil !. I rest my arm against the edge of the mandolin & as i say,i very lightly rest my hand against the bridge.

    I agree with Rdeane above re. arm rests. They are easier on the arm than the sharp edge of a mandolin top,but i had a nasty experience with the one that i bought - so no more arm rests for me,
    Ivan
    Weber F-5 'Fern'.
    Lebeda F-5 "Special".
    Stelling Bellflower BANJO
    Tokai - 'Tele-alike'.
    Ellis DeLuxe "A" style.

  8. #30
    Jim1Hays
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Loveland Colorado
    Posts
    67

    Default Re: Right Hand Planting vs. Free Floating

    I heard from an instructor that the right hand and fore arms should move as if you were turning a door knob with no anchor but free floating the right arm and hand allowing you to play double stops and tremello better. I am currently attempting to learn this method but find it rather difficult. I do ever so lightly rest my right wrist behind the bridge and use wrist action versus whole arm action for up and down strokes. I adjusted my strap to allow even follow through and access to all the strings as well. With whichever technique you decide to use, remember patience and practice will prevail!!

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •