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Thread: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

  1. #51
    en kunnskapssøker James Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Bruce got back to me on the refinish and tune up. He gave a $400 estimate - probably minus shipping - and he would have it for about 2 weeks. He doesn't care for the pick guard idea either.

    Am sure Bruce's work is well worth it and would almost be like getting a new mandolin again, providing no extra work would be needed. Just do not not have the funds available. So have to either have to leave the bald spot where it is or attempt a fix myself.

    She plays just fine. Think will do some research and find a good sealer, and wait until later on in life when I can afford Bruce's TLC.


    Oh, and Bruce said he will not make any more flat-tops. Did ask when a basic mandolin would cost. Let's say I am in a state of shock. I'm not good enough to play anything better than what I have ... and probably not good enough for this Y2K but she sure is fun to play. That is all the matters, right?


    Oh, and one local person suggested to go to some antique stores and find a nice Victorian styled fabric, one of the light weight ones, and maybe varnish that down over the bald spot. Intriguing idea, not that I would undertake such a feat. For the sake of ponderment ... am not sure how much of an impact that would have on the soundboard.
    If one could laminate such in between two very thin layers of material for a pick guard, it might make for interesting eye candy. More so it it had some of that gold material, maybe on a bowl back?
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  2. #52
    en kunnskapssøker James Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Took some photos tonight from what the blemished area looks like now.

    My view - Indoors at night
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    Standing up
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    And probably what would look like from the spectator viewpoint
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  3. #53

    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I'd love to get a Y2K. That would be my most preferred of all mandolins. Does Weber even still build them?

  4. #54
    My Florida is scooped pheffernan's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Quote Originally Posted by James Miller View Post
    Bruce got back to me on the refinish and tune up. He gave a $400 estimate - probably minus shipping - and he would have it for about 2 weeks. He doesn't care for the pick guard idea either.
    If the finish matters to you, I'd be more inclined to slap the pickguard back on it and sell it while looking for its replacement (if Cliff doesn't snag it first).

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  5. #55
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    James, if I were in your shoes, I would do the top refinish myself as I outlined for you in my 2 previous posts. A refinishing job like that is pretty low risk. If you don’t like how it turns out, you can always sand it off and start over until you are satisfied. The only downside is you can’t play it while it’s drying.

    I really wouldn’t recommend the fabric pickguard idea. It sounds too quirky and individualistic. If you ever decide topass it on, people don’t want quirky. It’s kind of like selling your house, the first thing they tell you to do when staging it is to put away family photos and knickknacks. If prospective buyers see your pictures of Aunt Matilda and the bowling trophy you won 20 years ago, they can’t imagine themselves in that house. Likewise, I couldn’t imagine myself playing some instrument with a laminated Victorian fabric pickguard. Of course, it’s your instrument, do what you wish.

    If you must do a pickguard, which would be the easiest solution, I would not use the one that was on it. I can’t even imagine getting off all that gunk. I would use it as a template to cut a new one out of some nice quality material like the Stew Mac Tortoid, then mount it properly with the 3M double sided adhesive film they sell for that purpose. Of course, you would probably experience a bit of that muting effect you noted before. But I still think the top refinish is the best idea. Mask off all but the top, sand it off, a couple light coats of shellac for sealer, then wipe on a few coats of Tru Oil or Danish Oil.

    Those who are looking for a Y2K, one popped up in the Classifieds today. Oh. I see Patrick already pointed that out.
    Don

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  7. #56
    Registered User belbein's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I'm totally with Multidon, as usual. First, don't think of this as a cheap instrument. Weber is one of three finest Luther's around, his are hand crafted and now that he's out of Weber, even his inexpensive instruments are rare. Fabric is a beyond - stupid idea ... I'll bet three proponent of that idea doughnut do woodworking or own instruments. Refinishing is very easy. In fact, given that its a natural finish, my guess is that light (LIGHT!!!!!) sanding and some shellac is all you need. The only problem is that you're impatient (we are still impatient) and you have to let shellac cure for a bit. If you want to turn this into a learning experience, you could learn to do French polish. It's very rewarding and ... teaches patience. If you're interested I can send you some notes.

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  9. #57
    Registered User Kalasinar's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I’m late to this thread but congratulations on your Y2K. I recently acquired a Weber Aspen I which is similar. Totally blown away by the tone, sustain and volume.

    Looking at the photos you posted above, the area where the pick guard was doesn’t look too bad. Of course at the same time, I completely understand you wanting to try to remedy it. If it were me, I’d do as mentioned above and very carefully sand and refinish it. Tru oil is a great finish and very easy to apply. Good luck with it, and most of all, enjoy that beauty!

  10. #58

    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I'd second what Kalasinar said above. It doesn't look too bad. Keep it as is, play it and enjoy it. Take it as a lesson learned about what not to do when tempted to perform modifications yourself!
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  12. #59
    en kunnskapssøker James Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Had actually been sealing the blemished area over the past 11 days or so. Prep work you might say, or keeping the area from getting any worse. Sprayed the Behlen instrument varnish into a tin canister (Altoids can) and finely brushed in the finish to seal the area. Had built it up enough to sand the corrugated area down to a smooth surface which is actually smoother than the original finish.

    Sand, brush in finish, wait two days. Repeat. Then sanded all that down using 400 grain sandpaper last night, taking it down to where the damaged area. Then used mineral oil and 600 grain sandpaper and made the area super smooth. Wiped that all off and it's drying again.

    Will look into that True Oil. From what information I had gathered Sound to Earth used an Amber Satin finish. The finish on it now is rougher than the sealed area I had been working on. At least I toned down that corrugated feeling area to where it is smooth. Still needs a proper finish, but for now it's good the way it is minus the missing dye.

    For now the area is repaired enough to play, minus the appearance of the bald spot. Going to have to wait for better, drier, warmer weather before even thinking of doing a refinish job. In the mean time I can do some research into refinishing and practicing on some scraps beforehand.


    Not interested in the F holed Y2K. Was specifically after an oval hole. Since could not afford a used Bridger I lept on this. Was probably too impatient on the purchase. Would send to Bruce, if I could afford it, to get a check-up done on it. Then he would probably say the frets would need to be redone. Name:  ahhh.gif
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  13. #60
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I have seen instruments the other way, when they have been in the sun over time, and someone removes the pickguard. The rest of the instrument is bleached out except where the pickguard was. It is basically the same refinishing job, or it can just be left alone, or put a pickguard back on.

  14. #61
    en kunnskapssøker James Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Have smoothed out that area, btw, using 100% tung oil. Am thinking the tint is difference is due to light exposure over time.
    People keep pestering me to put the pick guard back on, but I think it sounds better off. So what it has a bald spot. (LOL) The area is smooth. Was hoping the many thin coats of what tung oil I had left would darken up over time. Have some Behlin spray here. Was thinking of adding some amber dye and brushing it on, but undecided.

    It has a much more pronounced sustain and bark since putting the tung oil on. Was quite surprised by that. And there is a local luthier that the guys I jam with on Mondays keep trying to send me to. They are suggesting a wooden pick guard made.
    Pffft, I like the balding area, gives it character.



    Think about the only addition I'm going to invest in is a good looking & feeling strap. Been playing with shorter or longer positions trying to find what feels right. Once I get length down will see about finding a strap maker.
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  15. #62

    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I love flat tops. I wish I had caught the Y2K in the days Weber was making them.

  16. #63

    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Congrats on the Y2K! Ithink it looks fine like it is. Have fun!

    Bruce Weber is one of the few makers(that I have heard of) that has remarked about the dangers of over-humidifying wooden instruments.
    After all,it was made in Montana;so,I'm thinking fairly dry there(?) I have seen damage to some guitars
    from over-humidification using inside-the-instrument humidifiers.

    James Miller,I have a Weber arm-rest/tailpiece combo you might be interested in. It has a fancy "W" inlay. Not sure if it would fit your mando;but,you could try it. PM me if interested and we can work something out. It won't be $300. I am using one on a Kimble A-style. No clamps like on most arm-rests. It,mostly,floats above the rim of the top. Nice to have armrest and tp all in one piece of kit.

  17. #64
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    Well, James, when you asked for advice on what to do with that bare spot, nobody here recommended 100 percent tung oil. And yet that’s what you decided to use. Why would you ask for advice and then ignore it and go your own way? The problem with tung oil is that you will never get anything else to stick to it. The rule of thumb with finishes is “fat over lean”. That is, you can put something with more oil (like tung oil or Tru Oil) over something with less (like lacquer or shellac) but not visa versa. Lacquer will not stick over oil. If you had used shellac first, as I suggested, you would have been much better off. If you try spraying Behlen lacquer over that oil at this point you are in for a big disappointment. The only possible exception to the fat over lean rule is shellac. You might be able to use that on the tung oil. It really seems to have the ability to stick to just about anything.

    This will be my last post on the subject. Best of luck to you. Don, out.
    Don

    2016 Weber Custom Bitterroot F
    2011 Weber Bitterroot A
    1974 Martin Style A
    Fender Octave Mandolin c.2004-2008

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  19. #65
    Be Wild Zach Wilson's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    I like the way it looks. We'll call it Ol' Boldy 🤓

  20. #66
    en kunnskapssøker James Miller's Avatar
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    Default Re: Questions about Weber Y2K Mandolin

    The Danish finishing gave me a cue on another finishing method a lutheir had used.

    Seal. Sand. Seal. Sand. 100% Tung Oil. Buff. Sand. Repeat 4 times. Cure 1 month, minimum. At that stage now. Sand. Seal. Finish + sanding more.
    100% Tung oil has it inherent amber qualities.

    Similar to what I've done on a SAK Climber using Australian Silky Oak a few years back.
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